Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label HMS Duke of Wellington. Show all posts
Showing posts with label HMS Duke of Wellington. Show all posts

Tuesday, 28 June 2022

George Charles Mew and Sarah Jane Fudge

Kingston Cemetery, Portsmouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Basher Eyre - geograph.org.uk/p/2655103

George Charles Mew (24) married Sarah Jane Fudge (19) at the Anglican St Mary's Church, Portsea on 3 Mar 1870. This will have been in the second church on the site, built in 1843 and demolished in 1887. The bridegroom, a Steward on HMS Asia, lists his father as George Charles Mew, Petty Officer RN, while the bride, of Bridport Street, Portsmouth - born in 1850, in East Stonehouse, Plymouth, Devon - was the daughter of Thomas Fudge and Ann Beedle. Thomas Fudge, Seaman RN (his own marriage in 1834, listed him as a Royal Marine). Witnesses were Ann Fudge (likely the bride's mother) and W Hatch. 

George Charles Mew was born on 31 Mar 1845 at Cove of Cork, later Queenstown, now Cobh, Ireland. It's claimed he was baptised at St Colman's Cathedral, Cobh on 3 Apr 1845, but this cannot be true as construction of the cathedral was not even begun until 1868. The baptism record may well be held by the Cobh Parish Office, but the venue was undoubtedly St John the Baptist Catholic Church, which had stood on that site from 1810 to 1868 (and was where his parents and my 2x great-grandparents married the year before).

George and Sarah had eleven children in total:
  1. Lucy Elizabeth Ann Mew b. 1870 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 478, bap. Lucia Elizabetha at Portsmouth, St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral in 1872. Died, aged 6, in 1876 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 324.
  2. Mary Ann Mew b. 1872 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 452, bap. Maria Anna at Portsmouth, St John's RC Cathedral in 1872.
  3. George Charles Mew b. 9 Dec 1874, reg. M Quarter 1875 in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 463, bap. 15 August 1877 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth. Died, aged 37 in 1912 M Quarter in PORTSMOUTH Volume 02B Page 663.
  4. Annie Louisa Mew b. 18 May 1877 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 504, bap. 15 Aug 1877, at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral.
  5. Henrietta Mew b. 1879 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 493, bap. 1879 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral
  6. Henry Michael Mew b. 10 Oct 1881 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 522, bap. Henricus Michael in 1881, at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral
  7. Mabel Mary Mew b. 1884 S Quarter in PORTSEA Vol 02B Page 480.
  8. Lucy Maria Mew b. 1885 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 498, bap. Maria Lucia at St John's RC Cathedral, Portsmouth. Died age 1, in 1886 S Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND  Volume 02B  Page 350.
  9. Lucy Mary Mew b. 1887 D Quarter in PORTSEA Vol 02B Page 511.
  10. Margaret Marshall Mew b. 1889, reg. 1890 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 423, bap. Margarita Marshall in 1889 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth.
  11. Andrew Samuel Mew b. 1892, reg 1893 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 458, bap. Andreas Samuel in 1893 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral. Died, aged 2, in 1894  D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND  Volume 02B  Page 301, buried at Kingston Cemetery.
George Charles Mew had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1863. 

From 29 Apr 1863 until 31 Dec 1866, he was assigned to HMS Asia (1824), which, by that time was flagship of the Admiral-Superintendent of Portsmouth Dockyard. For much of that time George Charles Mew was a Warrant Officer's Servant or Cook. With HMS Rodney (1833) from 1 Jan 1867 to 4 May 1868, George was back with HMS Asia from 28 May 1868 to 31 Dec 1872 and engaged again from 1 Jan 1873 to 20 Feb 1874. His record in 1873 lists him as being 5ft 3in with brown hair, grey eyes and a dark complexion. 

In 1871, Sarah Mew (20) was lodging in Hertford Street, Portsea with her daughter Losie [Lucy] (0) and Anne Bailey (11) Visitor. This will have been her niece, Luisa Anne [Annie] Bailey, who was actually 13. She is also listed with her grandparents, so possibly being counted twice on a temporary visit. 

From 21 Feb 1874 to 21 Mar 1874, George became yet another (the 4th) of my relatives to serve, albeit briefly, on HMS Duke of Wellington (1852). From 6 May to 24 Aug 1874, he was with HMS Newcastle (1860) and his final posting was with HMS Endymion (1865) - which may have taken him to as exotic a location as Hull - from 25 Aug 1874 to 9 Aug 1875, when he was Invalided. 

In 1881, George Charles Mew (36) then a Tailor's porter, was a Lodger in the household of his in-laws, Thomas Fudge (72) Navy Pensioner and Ann Fudge (68) at 33, Bridport Street, Portsea, along with wife Sarah Jane (29), Mary Ann (9), George Charles (7), Annie Louisa (4) and Henrietta (1).

Sarah Jane, was baptised as Sara Joanna Mew - listed as a convert - at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth, on 3 Jul 1882.

In 1891, in Clarence Street, Portsea, were George Mew (47) Tailor's trimmer, Sarah Mew (40), Mary A (19) Tailoress; George Mew (16) Shoemakers apprentice; Annie Mew (13) Dressmakers apprentice; Henrietta Mew (11), Mabel Mew (7), Henry Mew (9), Lucy Mew (4) and Maggie Mew (1).

George Charles Mew of Clarence Street, Landport died, aged 48, on 8 Apr 1893 and was buried, on 13 April 1893, at at Kingston Cemetery, in a Catholic Slot, 4th Row, 12th Grave, the record states, in Unconsecrated Ground.

In 1901, Sarah Mew (50) Widowed, was still living at 46, Clarence Street, Portsmouth with son Harry Mew (19) Stableman; Mabel Mew (16) Corset Maker; Lucy Mew (13); Maggie Mew (11), married daughter Henrietta Hazzard (21), George Hazzard (22) Son-in-law, Journeyman Bricklayer and James Eyers (23) Blacksmith, Visitor. Son George Charles Mew (26) was a Stable Lad in the employ of Alfred Willson (50) Trainer of Race Horses in East Garston, Berkshire.

In 1911, Sarah Jane Mew (61) was employed as a Stay Lacer in a Stay Factory and living at 40 Fyning Street, Fratton, Portsmouth and living with her were daughter Margaret Marshall Mew (21) Assistant Stock Keeper and Alec John Mew (1), who appears to be Margaret's illegitimate child.

Sarah Jane Mew is reputed to have died in 1936 [yet to find record].

Wednesday, 6 April 2022

Frederick William Penfold and Harriet Mary Tubb

Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda SeanMD80 (talk) (Uploads), CC BY-SA 3.0

Frederick William Penfold (b. 20 Jul 1863) in Hartfield, Sussex, son of William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn (m. 1851), married Harriet Mary Tubb, daughter of Edward Tubb and Sarah Elizabeth Joy - sister of Herbert Joy Tubb and half-sister of Elizabeth Tubb and Susan Alice Tubb - in Edmonton, north London (why that area is unclear), in the second quarter of 1888.

Frederick and Harriet had five children: 

  1. Harriet Mary Penfold Tubb b. 1884 Q4 in CHELSEA Vol 01A Page 338
  2. George Edward Penfold b. 7 Mar 1889 in SHEPPEY Vol 02A Page 892
  3. Grace Joy Penfold b. 27 Aug 1892 in DOVER Volume 02A Page 982
  4. Frederick William Penfold b. 8 Oct 1896 in FULHAM Vol 01A Page 305
  5. Bert Penfold b. 14 Aug 1898 in ISLE OF WIGHT Vol 02B Page 599
Looking at this succession of birth locations: i. Frederick's mother, Mary Ann Penfold (55) died in in Chelsea, in 1886, so it may well have been to her that Harriet had gone. Frederick's elder brother, John Robert Penfold, Boot Maker, was certainly in Chelsea by 1891; ii. Sheppey makes sense that Harriet was able to return to her own mother for the birth of her first legitimate child; iii. this is the year after Frederick left the navy, so unsure why Dover (Harriet's mother's family, perhaps); iv. Fulham is where Frederick's younger brother Charles lived by 1897 and makes sense to go to his family for this birth, her own mother having died in 1895 and v. the Isle of Wight is where they'd moved in 1898.

Frederick William Penfold (106687), had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1878, at 15, as a Boy 2nd Class. His father had died in 1873, which may well have been motivation for going to sea. At that time he was 5ft tall, had dark brown hair, brown eyes and fair skin. He'd previously found work as a Gardener. Later, he grew to the lofty height of 5ft 5in and his complexion became ruddy. On 20 Jul 1881, his 18th birthday, Frederick signed up for a further period of 10 years.

Frederick William Penfold's Naval Career:

In 1881, Frederick William Penfold (18), Signal boy from Hartfield, Sussex, was listed under Royal Navy At Sea, Ships and Overseas Establishments with HMS Northampton, in Camber, Bermuda (Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda)

  • 16 Dec 1882 - 2 Apr 1884 - HMS Duncan (1859) which had been flag ship at Sheerness since 1879. (Exactly the right time and place for Frederick to meet Harriet, who was born and lived in Sheerness. Harriet's father, Edward Tubb, died in Jan 1884. We might conclude therefore that Harriet, then 16, sought solace in Frederick.)
  • 3 Apr 1884 - 30 Jun 1886HMS Carysfort (1878), which in 1884 and 1885, landed men for the naval brigade at Sudan (during the Mahdist War, which claimed the life of Gordon of Khartoum). During this time, there is a note on Frederick's service record saying "Mily Gaol Alexandria 42 days" (Gabbari military prison, Alexandria, Egypt). Doesn't give the exact dates or what for, but 42 days is unlikely to be too serious. Drunk maybe? Apr 1886 Mediterranean. 8 May 1886 Serving in Greek Waters. 19 Jun 1886 Malta.

Crossing Malta's Grand Harbour by Water Taxi


In 1891, Frederick W Penfold (27), Qualified signalman, married, is a 'Member of crew' of HMS Excellent in Portsmouth Harbour. Harriet Mary Penfold (26), Harriet M Penfold (6) and George E Penfold (2) were visiting Harriet's widowed mother, Sarah E Tubb (61) at her lodgings in Trinity Road, Minster in Sheppey.

In 1898, George Edward Penfold, son of Frederick William Penfold, Commercial Agent, of 22 West Street, Newport, was enrolled at the Newport Board School in Newport, Isle of Wight. His previous school was Board School Southsea.

But the next record we find, is on 22 Sep 1899, when George Penfold, aged 9, from Barnardo Homes, sails to Toronto, Canada on the vessel Arawa. "According to the Barnardo records [Grace Joy] was admitted to the Barnardo's Homes in England on July 22, 1899 at the age of 7 with her brother George." [Source]

In 1901, Harriet M Penfold (32) still listed as married, was at 49, Trafalgar Road, Newport, Isle of Wight, with Frederick W Penfold (4). George E Penfold, in 1901, then 12, was listed as a Domestic in the household of a David White from Scotland, in Assiniboia EastNorthwest Territories, Canada. 

Frederick William Penfold, then a house painter (journeyman) of 2 Seagrave Rd, Fulham, died, aged 37, on 7 Apr 1901, of a cerebral hemorrhage (stroke) in Fulham Infirmary. His elder brother, John Robert Penfold of 52, Hogarth Buildings, Westminster is listed as the informant and was in attendance.

We read here that, "According to family hearsay Fredrick left the family at some stage prior to his death and Harriett could not keep the family together and it seems that her son George was put into a Barnardo’s Home and sent to Canada in 1899 at the age of 10." And, sadly, the trail of records does bear this out.

On 31 July 1904, G J Penfold (11) Female (Grace Joy) from Barnardo Homes sailed to Toronto, Canada on the vessel RMS Southwark.

Then on 3 May 1907, the youngest, Bert Penfold (8) from Barnardo Homes sailed to Toronto, Canada on the vessel SS Dominion.

So it wasn't just George who was sent to Barnardo Homes, but three of the children: George, Grace and Bert, who became Home Children sent to Canada: "​From the late 1860s right up to 1948, over 100,000 children of all ages were emigrated right across Canada, from the United Kingdom, to be used as indentured farm workers and domestics. Believed by Canadians to be orphans, only approximately 12 percent truly were". "For the most part, these children were not picked up from the streets but came from intact families, who, through sickness or even death of one of their parents, had fallen on hard times."

In Oct 1910, Harriet Mary Penfold (40) Domestic and Frederick William Penfold (13) at School, make their way to Quebec, Canada (and apparently on to Bracebridge, Ontario) on the vessel Lake Manitoba, travelling steerage from Liverpool. Next to Harriet's name is the stamp, British Bonus Allowed, which was was a commission paid by the Canadian government's Immigration Branch to steamship booking agents (not to the immigrants themselves).

In 1911, Fred Penfold (listed as born 1897, but immigration year 1910) was in Guelph, Wellington South, Ontario, Canada in a household with two English ladies: Letia Camocott (b. 1865) and Alice Merridon (b. 1873) Lodger. It doesn't say in what capacity, but as he would then be 15, presumably Fred was either working for them or elsewhere and boarding there. Meanwhile Bert Penfold (12) that year was a Boarder in the household of Canadian couple, George Gilbert (b. 1873) and his wife, Etta, in Muskoka, Ontario, Canada.

All three boys: George Edward, Frederick William Jr and Bert, it seems served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, during World War I.

Grace Penfold (23) married Benjamin Folie (24), son of George Folie, on 10 Aug 1914 in Toronto, Canada. On the marriage record however, in the space where her parents names should be, it has 'unknown' written across the space, so I think we have to assume that her mother had not reencountered her.

In 1916, H M Penfold (48) Female (Harriet Mary) - immigration year 1910 - was in the household of Englishman, Charles M C Westaway (32) in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, seemingly employed as Housekeeper.  

Harriet Mary Penfold (née Tubb) died, aged 67, on 27 Aug 1934 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada and is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon.


Their name liveth forever

Wednesday, 9 March 2022

James Henry Tubb and Susannah Bussey

HMNB Portsmouth and HMS Victory
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Dixon - geograph.org.uk/p/4091430

James Henry Tubb (b. 1 Apr 1834), son of William Tubb and Sarah Ruff - brother of Edward Tubb - married Susannah Bussey, daughter of Benjamin Bussey and Elizabeth Bowen - and sister of Hannah Bussey, on 10 Nov 1857, at the second (built 1843), St. Mary's Church, Portsea. (Not for the first time among my relatives that two brothers had married two sisters.)

James and Susannah had six children: 
  1. Sarah Elizabeth Tubb b. 1858 S Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 337, bap. 6 Feb 1859 at St Mary's Church, Portsea. (Sarah Elizabeth Tubb later married Alfred Burgess Tregurtha on 12 Feb 1883. Sarah died on 25 Feb 1946. They are both buried at Williamstown Cemetery.)
  2. James Alfred Tubb b. 24 Dec 1861, GRO Reference: 1862 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 424, bap. 23 Feb 1862 at St Mary's Church, Portsea. (James Alfred Tubb married Evelyn Winch. James Alfred Tubb died on  23 Nov 1918 (aged 56) and is buried at Williamstown CemeteryWilliamstown, Victoria, Australia.)
  3. William Henry Tubb b. 1863 D Quarter in SOUTHAMPTON Volume 02C Page 8, bap. 1 Jan 1865 at All Saints' Church, Southampton (regularly attended by author Jane Austen while she lived in Southampton and Pre-Raphaelite painter Sir John Everett Millais was baptised there.) Not included in the family grave in Australia, there was, however, a William Henry Tubb of the right vintage, who may have returned to Portsmouth.
  4. George Ernest Tubb b. 1866 J Quarter in SOUTH STONEHAM Volume 02C Page 65, bap. 8 Jul 1866, as George Emett Tubb, in Freemantle. He married Margaret Curtis, in Victoria, Australia in 1891. George Ernest Tubb, son of James Henry and Susan Tubb, died in Rylstone, New South Wales, in 1938.
  5. Nelly Tubb b. 1868 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 471. (Nelly Tubb married Walter Beverley Wood in Victoria, Australia, in 1890. Nelly Wood died, aged 25-26, on 12 Apr 1895.)
  6. Minnie Beatrice Tubb b. 1877 in Australia. (Minnie Beatrice Tubb married Henry John Manderson. Minnie died on 6 Jul 1967.)
James Tubb, from Landport, Hants, born 1 Apr 1834, 5ft 8in tall, with fair complexion, brown hair and grey eyes, had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a Boy First Class at 16, in 1850. James Tubb (16), Sailor was listed on the 1851 census in his parent's house, in Marylebone Street, Portsea.

James Henry Tubb's Naval Career: 

The Russian (Crimean War) War of 1854 - 1856:
This is the second of my relatives to have served in the Baltic during the Crimean War and also the second to have taken part in the 1856 Royal Fleet Review. At the review, the HMS Duke of Wellington was at the head of the Port line, while, according to the report in the The Illustrated London News, 26 April 1856, "Abreast of the Port line the Royal George led the Starboard [...] Then came the Nile ..." So not only were both sides of my family represented at the Review, they were on both sides of the line and their ships almost side-by-side.


HMS Marlborough in Valletta harbour, sometime between 1858 and 1864.

  • From 9 Feb 1858 until 22 Mar 1861, assigned to HMS Marlborough (1855) which will have taken him back to the Mediterranean. Feb 1858 Commissioned, Delayed sailing 128 days due to a lack of men. 1860 Flag Ship, Mediterranean. 22 Mar 1861 Paid off.

In 1861, James Tubb (27) Seaman RN, is listed as living in Landport View, Portsea, with wife Susan Tubb (26) and daughter, Sarah Tubb (2).

  • From 23 Mar 1861 to 14 Apr 1862 back at HMS Excellent.
  • From 15 Apr 1862 through to 7 Aug 1866, James was with HMS Boscawen (1844), which from Feb/Mar of 1862 had been hulked as a Boys training ship in Southampton Water. (This explains son William Henry Tubb's baptism taking place in Southampton, in 1865.)
  • A third stint at HMS Excellent from 8 Aug 1866 to 5 Oct 1867.

Taken at Williamstown, Victoria,
between 1870 and 1879.
Port broadside view of the wooden
steam battleship HMVS Nelson.
Then from 6 Oct 1867 to 14 Feb 1868, James was with HMS Nelson (1814). Given his history, I'd first thought they'd mean the shore establishment of the same name, but it was, in fact, an actual ship. Nelson was given to the colony of Victoria, and sailed for Australia in October 1867, thus James was on that handover voyage. Clearly, this also gave him the opportunity to see that part of Australia that the family would later make their home.

Back in Portsmouth between 15 Feb 1868 and 1 Mar 1869, James was, once more, assigned to HMS Victory shore establishment. 

James' final assignment, from 2 Mar 1869 until his retirement from the Royal Navy on 31 Dec 1870, was with HMS Duke of Wellington (1852) - coincidentally also my 2x great-grandfather's final ship in 1856 - at which time she replaced HMS Victory as flagship of the Port Admiral at Portsmouth (with Victory becoming her tender), her duties consisting of firing salutes to passing dignitaries, such as Queen Victoria on her way to Osborne House. As a Gunner's Mate since 6 Sep 1860, James may have helped fire those salutes.

In 1871, Susan Tubb (37) Seaman's wife, was living at 11 Besant Terrace, Portsea with Sarah (12), James (9), William (7), Ernest (5) and 'Millie' (Nelly) (3).

''Queen of Nations'' by Richard Ball Spencer

On 19 Mar 1873, Susan Tubb (38), Sarah E (14), James A (10), Wm Hy (9), George E (6) and Nelly (4), departed from Plymouth - the one in Devon, England, not America - on the clipper, Queen of Nations. They arrived in Melbourne after a journey of around 140 days. 

I've [so far] not seen a record of how James Henry got back to Australia, but I wouldn't mind betting he worked his passage as a merchant seamen.

Susan Tubb (née Bussey) died on 20 Aug 1912 and is buried in Williamstown CemeteryWilliamstown, Victoria, Australia. She will have been 80.

James Henry Tubb died on 8 Nov 1922, and is also buried in Williamstown CemeteryWilliamstown, Victoria, Australia. He will have been 88.

The Family Grave of J H Tubb at Williamstown Cemetery, Victoria, Australia Photo: Suzy & Rob

Saturday, 1 January 2022

Thomas Jones' goes to war in the Baltic 1854-1856

HMS Duke of Wellington in drydock at Keyham, Devonport Dockyard, 5 Mar 1854

Thomas Jones, I imagine, must have been happy to get the equivalent of a desk job - or at least become captain of his own rowing boat - for the Coast Guard Service, which allowed him to stay at home and have some family life. It cannot have been easy to marry in 1844, then go off to sea for three years. He won't have seen his daughter, Mary Ann, until she was around 2 years old. 

At Sutton Bridge, in 1849 and 1850, Thomas and his wife Mary had added two sons and, in Ireland, while at Baltimore, West Cork, they added another daughter and son, in 1851 and 1853, respectively. Then along came the Crimean War

Whether he volunteered or was required to do so, Thomas Jones then joined the crew of HMS Duke of Wellington (1852) on 14 Feb 1854, as a Petty Officer First Class - sufficient to distinguish him from ordinary ratings. (The timing of which means that Thomas could well be 'in the photo' (somewhere inside the ship) at the time the above photo was taken on 5 Mar 1854.)

Thomas' 4th son and namesake was born, in 1854, after he'd sailed, so he won't have met this child either until he was around 2 years old. And, one must remember, Thomas was going to war: no guarantee he ever would. 

On 11 Mar 1854 Duke of Wellington, it's reported, departed Spithead (which infers that she had sailed from Plymouth to Portsmouth during the intervening six days), with the fleet, for the Baltic, where, on 15 Apr 1854 she captured Russian brig Patrioten [Prize Money per London Gazette of 21 Jul 1857].

On 13 Jun 1854 the French fleet joined the British in the Baltic at Baro Sound

On 10 Aug 1854 guns were landed and sent up to the British battery, in charge of men under officers from the EdinburghDuke of Wellington, and Euryalus.

The Bombardment of Sveaborg, 9 August 1855 by John Wilson Carmichael
Duke of Wellington is 2nd from left, with Thomas' previous ship, from his expedition to China during the First Opium WarHMS Belleisle (1819), alongside on the far left.

On 9-11 Aug 1855Duke of Wellington was involved in the Bombardment of Sveaborg, a.k.a. Battle of Suomenlinna, during the Åland War:

"British and French naval forces consisting of 77 ships arrayed for the long-expected battle on 6 August 1855. They formed into a battle line more than 3 km off shore beyond the range of the defenders' obsolete artillery. Three days later the bombardment commenced. It continued for 47–48 hours. All the while, the attacker sat beyond the range of the defenders' guns. The British and French bombarded only the fortress of Viapori and avoided firing at the town of Helsinki directly. While the bombardment caused damage to the structures above ground, including to several gunpowder magazines which exploded, the bulk of the defending forces survived unscathed with their weaponry intact, leading to a draw stalemate." 

After the bombardment, the Anglo-French fleet sent no troops ashore and instead set sail for Kronstadt. Then, with little more fanfare, Duke of Wellington is listed, on 4 Feb 1856, "At Spithead".

Review of the Fleet at Spithead by the Queen, April 23, 1856

On 23 Apr 1856 Present at Fleet Review, Spithead; under Captain Caldwell CB.

From February until April, one can imagine, were several weeks of scrubbing, polishing and painting every component of the vessel until it was 'shipshape'. 

In April 1856 the first recorded evening illumination of the fleet took place.

The Illustrated London News, 26 April 1856 reported the event:

"On Saturday, after some days spent in evolutions of a preparatory nature, the fleet anchored in a stately line, with the Duke of Wellington at its head, bearing the Admiral's (Vice-Admiral Sir Richard Saunders Dundas, KCB) ensign." [...] "At the head of this imposing squadron was the Duke of Wellington, her 131 ports shining in the sun, which showed her chequered sides, bright with paint."

"The Queen's yacht, emerging from the surrounding smoke, proceeded rapidly past Fort Monckton, meeting everywhere the same enthusiastic reception, and, having rounded into a position to return down the centre line, entered the squadron of gun-boats, disposed in double rows on each side of her course, and majestically proceeded on her way. She glided past the small vessels of the flotilla, passed steam-frigates of various strength and speed, passed the giant screw line-of-battle ships, till she reached the Duke of Wellington, greeted in all directions by the most enthusiastic cheers." 

What a finale for such a fascinating career. It will have been a proud moment.

HMS Duke of Wellington - Guide 272

NextThomas Jones' posting to Baltimore, Cork 1851-1868

Further reading: 

  1. Star of the show: HMS Duke of Wellington (1852)
  2. HMS Duke of Wellington (launched as Windsor Castle, 1852)
  3. Royal Navy ranks, rates, and uniforms of the 18th and 19th centuries
  4. Life at sea in the age of sail