Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Tuberculosis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tuberculosis. Show all posts

Friday 5 April 2024

Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman

Royal Marines' Stonehouse Barracks, Durnford Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth

Tom Stone (b. 11 Dec 1861 in Ashbrittle, Somerset), son of Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway, married and Margaret Knapman (b. 28 Aug 1863 at Mary Rows (Mary Rose?) Cottage, St Budeaux Devon), daughter of Thomas Knapman and Kitty Horden. There's a record of their marriage, in Q1 1889, however, the British Royal Marines Marriage Registers, lists it as the Register Office, East Stonehouse on 5 Apr 1893. As there was no such thing as a Register Office (until after 1929), I assume this was an administrative ratification, once permission was granted, of the ceremony that had taken place in 1889, although there are civil registrations for both dates.

Peter Calver at Lost Cousins, potentially provides the explanation, as these rules would almost certainly apply to Marines too, "... soldiers needed the permission of their commanding officer if they wanted the marriage to be recognised (which is why you will sometimes come across a couple who married each other twice)." Either date was a little late and, in the haste to legitimise their eldest, may have forgotten to ask permission of the CO. 

On 11 Mar 1880, Tom Stone, then 18, enlisted in the Royal Marines, at that time was 5' 6¾", with a fair complexion, dark brown hair and hazel eyes. His record states, "Right little finger amputated through second phalanx." As well as various stints at Plymouth Division, from 1881 to 1884 Tom was with HMS Mallard (1875), a Forester-class composite screw gunboat; from 3 Oct 1889 until 3 Jan 1893, he was assigned to HMS Himalaya (1854)

In 1881, Tom Stone (19) Private RMLI was in Devonport, Stoke Damerel; There were a Thomas and Catherine Knapman in Tamerton-Foliott in 1881, who I believe to have been Margaret's parents. (Catherine was from Waterford, Ireland.); and Margaret Knapman (16) was a General Domestic Servant to Henry Couch (58) Farmer at Hays End, Tamerton-Foliott.

Tom and Margaret had six children:
  1. Archer Henry Stone (Archie), b. 28 Mar 1889 (1889 J Quarter in PLYMPTON ST MARY Volume 05B Page 223), bap. 21 May 1889, at the Wesleyan Methodist church, Tamerton Foliot. Died, at 18, on 11 Nov 1907, in Gillingham, Kent (1907 D Quarter in MEDWAY Vol 02A Page 393). Commemorated in Rookwood Cemetery in Sydney, Australia.
  2. Frederick Thomas Stone, b. 20 Jan 1892 (1892 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 297)
  3. Beatrice May Stone, b. 14 Mar 1894 (1894 J Quarter in PLYMPTON ST MARY Volume 05B Page 189), bap. 27 May 1894 in Hooe, Plymouth
  4. Bertram Charles Stone, b. 24 Feb 1899 (1899 J Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 273) Died 16 Jun 1899 (1899 J Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 211)
  5. Leslie Victor Stone, b. 21 Feb 1901 (1901 J Quarter in DEVONPORT Volume 05B Page 273)
  6. Rosina Kathleen Stone, b. 14 Apr 1903 (1903 J Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 238)
In 1891, Margaret Stone (25) and Archer H Stone (2) had been staying with her sister, Lucy Hoskins (23) in Star Lane, Tamerton Foliott.

In 1901 the family were living at 9, St Paul Street, East Stonehouse, with Tom Stone (39) listed as a Marine Pensioner. (Tom served in the Royal Marines for 21 years (+ 2 days), from 11 Mar 1880 until 13 Mar 1901, transferring to the Royal Fleet Reserve on 3 Jul 1901.) Also listed were Margaret (35), Archie (12), Frederick (9), Beatrice (7) and Leslie (0).

Archer Henry Stone enlisted in the Royal Marines, at 14, on 11 Nov 1903.

Tom Stone, General Labourer and Marine Pensioner, died, aged 43, at 3 Ashley Place, Plymouth, on 2 May 1905 (1905 J Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 171), from Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

On 11 Nov 1907, Archie Stone (18) died at the Royal Naval Hospital (Medway Maritime Hospital) in Gillingham, Kent, of a Tubercle of the lung (Tuberculosis again) and cardiac failure. Initially, it didn't make sense that there was a commemorative stone to Archer Henry Stone in Rookwood Cemetery in Sydney, Australia (albeit as Arthur H. Stone, Bugler, R.M.L.I. - his mates may not have known that Archer was the name he was registered and baptised with). However, this would appear to be one of many memorials to shipmates who died elsewhere. A closer look at Archer's Royal Marines record shows that in Feb/Mar 1907 Archer was with HMS Powerful (1895) that became the flagship of the Australia Station. He then transferred to HMS Prometheus (1898) and finally to HMS Pioneer, at that time a drill ship with the Australian Squadron. Archie's last line with Pioneer says he was 'on passage', which presumably means he was being brought home. 

In 1911, Margaret Stone, widowed and in receipt of Parochial Relief, was living in East Stonehouse, with Leslie V (10) and Rosina K (7). Frederick had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1907 and Beatrice (17) was working as a Servant for Samuel Reed, Hairdresser and Tobacconist, in Devonport.

On 11 Apr 1919, aged 18, Leslie Victor Stone joined the Royal Tank Corps.

In 1921, Margaret Erne Stone (57) Widowed; Frederick Thomas Stone (29) Royal Navy (Leading Signalman) and Rosina Kathleen Stone (18) were still living at 9, St Paul Street, East Stonehouse. Leslie Victor Stone (20) was with the Army Tank Corps at Pinehurst Barracks, Farnborough, Hampshire.

Margaret Erne Stone died, on 1 Sep 1921, aged 57 (1921 S Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 324), and probate was granted to her son, Frederick Thomas Stone, on 24 Dec 1921.

Monday 25 March 2024

Richard Wilton and Catherine Byatt

Quaker Meeting House (1835), New Street, Great Dunmow

Richard Wilton (bap. 20 Mar 1811 in Royston, Hertfordshire), middle son of Stephen Wilton and Elizabeth Hankin, married Catherine Byatt (bap. 4 Apr 1824 in Little Canfield, Essex), daughter of John Byatt and Jane Stokes, at the Independent Meeting House (Quaker Meeting House), New Street, Great Dunmow, on 25 Mar 1843, according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Protestant Dissenters. Richard Wilton, who had been listed on the 1841 census, living in the High Street, Great Dunmow, as a harness maker (as he is on the marriage certificate), was 32 at the time of the wedding and Catherine Byatt, then 19, was listed as a minor. Witnesses were Richard's younger brother Joseph Wilton and Maria Staines (then 17) sister of Richard's brother, Henry's wives (both), daughters of Thomas Staines and Sally Hockley

Richard and Catherine had seven children:
  1. Ann Wilton b. 1844 M Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 76, mother's maiden name BYATE. (Died 27 Apr 1850 (1850 J Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 56), aged 6, buried 2 May 1850)
  2. Elizabeth Wilton b. 6 Aug 1847 (1847 S Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 69 1847 Q3 - the whole of volume 12 is missing except for the first page (about 3000 entries missing)
  3. Richard Wilton b. 1848 (No GRO birth registration) (Died, aged 41, in 1889 J Quarter in POPLAR Volume 01C Page 322)
  4. Walter Wilton b. 1850 D Quarter in DUNMOW Volume 12 Page 79 (Died, aged 1, in 1852 M Quarter in DUNMOW Vol 04A Page 219)
  5. Martha Wilton b. 1853 M Quarter in DUNMOW Vol 04A Page 317 (Died, aged 1, in 1854 J Quarter in DUNMOW Vol 04A Page 209)
  6. William Wilton b. 1855 J Quarter in DUNMOW Volume 04A Page 311 (Died, aged 3, in 1858 J Quarter in DUNMOW Vol 04A Page 223)
  7. Ellen Wilton b. 1857 J Quarter in DUNMOW Vol 04A Page 335 
On the birth registrations for Walter, Martha, William and Ellen, the mother's maiden name is correctly listed as BYATT.

Richard Wilton, Harness maker (journeyman), died on 3 Mar 1858, from Phthisis (pulmonary tuberculosis). He was 46.

George Wilton, born in the Dunmow Union (Workhouse) on 3 Feb 1860 (1860 M Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 361), birth certificate says his mother's name was Caroline Wilton, no father listed, but I cannot find a Caroline Wilton in the area at any time. On later census returns George was listed as Catherine's new husband - John Eldred's - step-son, so George appears to have been Catherine's 'mystery' illegitimate son.

In 1861, the widowed Catherine (surname transcribed as Wilson), was living with her brother, William Byatt, in Little Canfield. George Wilton, aged 1, was listed there as nephew to the head of the household. There was a Stephen Wilton (13) Baker, lodging in the household of Elizabeth Edwards (73) at Dunmow Down, Great Dunmow, however, I believe this was a pseudonym used by their son Richard Wilton (see 1884 below). While, the 13 year old Elizabeth and her 4 year old sister, Ellen (listed as being 6), were that year, listed as inmates in the Great Dunmow Union Workhouse.

Catherine then remarried to John Eldred, widower, on 27 Sep 1862 in Great Dunmow. (Various records list her previous surname as Walton or Wilson.)

John Eldred (bap. 10 Mar 1822 in Great Dunmow) son of William Eldred and Eleanor Fewell, had married for the first time to Harriett Page, on 20 Aug 1848, in Great Dunmow. John and Harriett Eldred had three sons: 
  1. John Eldred b. 1849 D Quarter in DUNMOW Volume 12 Page 73, bap. 10 Jul 1853 in Great Dunmow. (Died aged 10, in 1860 J Quarter in DUNMOW Volume 04A Page 224)
  2. Walter Eldred b. 1852 D Quarter in WHITECHAPEL Volume 01C Page 355, bap. 10 Jul 1853 in Great Dunmow. On the baptism, his father's occupation is listed as Brewer's Servant and address given as No 12 Smith Place High Street Wapping London. (Died, aged 18, in 1871 J Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 256)
  3. Alfred Eldred bap. 12 Aug 1855 in Great Dunmow
But Harriet Eldred died aged 28, in 1855 D Quarter in SAINT GEORGE IN THE EAST Volume 01C Page 312.

John Eldred remarried to Elizabeth Tennisse, Widow, daughter of John Pitts, Mariner, on 2 Nov 1856 at Christ Church, St George in the East. Elizabeth Pitts had previously married James Tennisse in 1854, in Bethnal Green. The pair had three children, all of whom died as infants: Maria Sophia Tennisse (1849-1853); James John Tennisse (1851-1856) and Sarah Tennisse (1853-1855). James Tennisse also died, at 32, in 1855, in Stepney.

John and Elizabeth Eldred had one daughter:
  1. Thomazine Maria Eldred b. 24 Jul 1857 S Quarter in SAINT GEORGE IN THE EAST Volume 01C Page 413, bap. 4 Apr 1858 in the parish of St George in the East, Stepney. Her father's occupation was listed as Drayman and their address again as 12 Smith's Place.
Then Elizabeth Pitts Eldred died, aged 30, in 1859 J Quarter in SAINT GEORGE IN THE EAST Volume 01C Page 271. 

So when Catherine Wilton married John Eldred, she became his third wife.

In 1871, living in Braintree Road, Great Dunmow, were John Eldred (44) Ag Lab, Catherine Eldred (42) both had lost 5 years; Walter Eldred (18) Son, Alfred Eldred (16) Son, Maria Eldred (13) Daughter, Ellen Wilton (14) Step-Daughter; George Wilton (11) Step-Son; and Alice Wilton (2) Granddaughter (Alice Catherine Wilton born 12 Feb 1869, to Elizabeth Wilton.)

Then John Eldred died, aged 49, in 1876 D Quarter in WEST HAM UNION Volume 04A Page 54. 

In 1881, Catherine Eldridge (sic) (56) Widow, Dressmaker from Cranfield (sic), Essex, was living at 23, Powis Road, Bromley, Poplar, with Richard Wilton (31) Labourer; George Wilton (21) Labourer; Ellen Wilton (24) Match Maker; Susan Robinson (21) Match Maker (Boarder) and four Lodgers: William Wardley (20) Labourer from Sudbury, Suffolk; Arthur Seatch (36) Labourer from Bromley; Frank Poulter (24) Carman from Cambridge and James Howard (18) Match Maker (Fusee) from Bromley.

Matchgirl strikers, several showing early symptoms of phosphorus necrosis. Unknown author, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
White Slavery in London

Living little more than half a mile from the Bryant & May's factory in Bow, it's probably reasonable to assume this was where they were all employed, where conditions were especially bad

"The match girls worked from 6.30am (or 8am in winter) until 6pm, with just two breaks, standing all the time. “A typical case”, wrote Besant, “is that of a girl of 16, a piece worker; she earns 4s a week ..." (Worth around £26 in 2020).

"Conditions were appalling for the 1,400 women and girls who worked at Bryant and May's match factory in Bow, East London. Low pay for a 14-hour day was cut even more if you talked or went to the toilet, and 'phossy jaw' - a horrible bone cancer caused by the cheap type of phosphorus in the matches - was common." 

"If you handled white phosphorus or came into contact with it too much, then it caused serious damage to your health and you ended up with a terrible condition known as ‘Phossy Jaw’ – where you would get severe toothache followed by swelling of the gums. Abscesses would then form on the jaw-bone, and the facial bones would glow a greeny white in the dark. If untreated then ‘Phossy Jaw’ would develop into brain damage and ultimately multiple organ failure." As a result of these appalling conditions, the London Matchgirls Strike of 1888 started in the factory, which led to the establishment of the first British trade union for women. Match Girls Strike at Bryant and May Factory: The 1888 Uprising for Workers’ Rights in London

Having checked the records, I know my 2x great-grand aunt was not involved in the Matchgirls Strike in 1888, but it gives an insight into the conditions she must have endured. She could have been involved in an earlier, unsuccessful, strike in 1881. [As yet] I've found no verified record of Ellen Wilton after 1881, so she may have already become a victim of these circumstances.

The Essex Herald of 20 Oct 1884 reported on "WHOLESALE SHOP LIFTING. - Richard Wilton, a navvy, of Bromley-by-Bow, was brought up in custody charged with stealing a black rep cloth overcoat and 12 pairs of tanned leggings, value £1, from the shop of Edwin Joseph Wilton, in High Street, Dunmow on Saturday night last. Prisoner was further charged with stealing six twill jackets, value 24s, the property of Mr John Beard, of North Street, Great Dunmow, on Saturday night. Superintendent Ackers stated that the greater part of the property had been recovered and identified, and, it being believed that others were implicated in the robbery, he asked that the prisoner, who was only arrested on Sunday night, might be remanded. The prisoner was accordingly remanded for a week. Later reports, which (incorrectly named the perp as Stephen Wilton (36) Baker) noted that Mr Wilton stated the prisoner was his cousin. The prisoner was acquitted. (There were two cousins, to both Richard and Edwin, named Stephen Wilton [1] [2] - neither were angels - but I'm sure that this was not either of them.

Of Catherine's two surviving children and two step-children: her daughter Elizabeth Wilton; her son George WiltonAlfred Eldred and Thomazine Maria Eldred ... all four gave the name Catherine as the first or middle name to their first child. In the case of her step-son, Alfred's wife's mother was also named Catherine to account for this, but for all of them to use the name, I think tells us far more about Catherine as a person than records usually can.

So far, I've not found a death for Catherine, but with so many incorrect names given throughout her life, it's not easy to guess what it might be listed under. There's also the chance, of course, that she remarried once again and therefore this is under yet another totally new name.

Wednesday 6 March 2024

James Prescott and Mary Ann Stone

Tiverton : Gold Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/1658721

James Prescott (b. 1858 in Washfield, Devon), son of John Prescott and Jane Gage, married Mary Ann Stone (b. 1860, in Ashbrittle, Somerset), daughter of Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway, at St Peter's, Tiverton, on 6 Mar 1882. Witnesses were Henry Stone and Harriet Stone, Mary Ann's sister.

By 1881, Mary Ann (21) had left home and had been working, as a General Domestic Servant, for Alfred T Gregory, Newspaper Proprietor, in Gold Street, Tiverton, hence marrying in the town. (Alfred Gregory was publishing titles such as the Tiverton Gazette and East Devon Herald, Western Observer and affiliated papers for South Molton and Crediton. (The Tiverton and District Directory for 1894-5 lists them as, Gregory, Son, and Tozer.)

However, this couple were married for little more than a year, when Mary Ann Prescott died, tragically aged just 23, on 14 Apr 1883, in Chapel Street, Tiverton, from Acute Phthisis Pulmonalis (Tuberculosis (TB) 18 days - I'd suspected this when reading that Mary Ann had been present at the death of her brother, John Stone, when he had died from Phthisis, in the August of 1882. Her mother-in-law, Jane Prescott, was present at Mary Ann's death. 

Not unsurprisingly, James Prescott remarried quite quickly, to a Jane Davey in the 1st quarter of 1884, also in Tiverton. Then, in the 3rd quarter of 1884, they had a son Charles, who, it appears was their only child. 

My connection was broken once Mary Ann died, but one can't help being curious: In 1891, James Prescott (32), Labourer, wife Jane and son Charles were living in Eglwysilan, Glamorganshire, Wales; in 1901, we find the trio - with James a Navvy Ganger - in Staines, Middlesex and then, in 1911, with James Prescott (56) Dock Labourer, at 15 Unicorn St, Portsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire with Jane Prescott (57) and five other dock labourers in the household, presumably boarders. Son Charles, also living in Unicorn Street, Portsmouth and a Railway Labourer, was by then married. You wouldn't expect labourers at that time to have moved around so much or so far.

James' parents, John and Jane Prescott, meanwhile, then aged 78 and 83, respectively, were still alive and still living in Tiverton in 1911.

James Prescott was buried on 22 Oct 1913, in Uplowman.

Monday 25 December 2023

Harry Martin and Mabel Grace Tompson

St Giles, Cripplegate, London EC2
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/1209117

Harry Martin (b. Jan 1883 in WestbourneEmsworth, Hants, son of William Henry Martin and Mercy King, married Mabel Grace Tompson (b. 6 Aug 1878), daughter of Dan Tompson and Sarah Jane Baker, at St Giles-without-Cripplegate, on 25 Dec 1913. Witnesses were Daisy Kritzer (Mabel's sister, Sarah Sophia) and Job Sweeney, husband of Mabel and Sarah's elder half-sister, Eliza Louisa, (who lived in Fore Street, close to this church).

In 1911, Mabel Grace was Lady's Maid in the household of Sir Philip Hickson Waterlow, 2nd Baronet, one of the Waterlow baronets, then Chairman of Waterlow and Sons, at 24 Carlton House Terrace, St Martin in the Fields. Listed as 29, she was actually in her 30s and presumably maid to Lady Waterlow, Sir Phillip's second wife, Laura Marie (née Jones). Meanwhile, Harry Martin, then 26, was a Motor Car Driver, residing at The Stables, Trosley Towers Near Wrotham, Stansted, Kent. Sir Philip Hickson Waterlow had inherited the Trosley Towers (more images) estate from his father (part is now the Trosley Country Park), which confirms that both Mabel and Harry worked for the Waterlows, which is undoubtedly how they met.

The couple had one daughter:
  1. Laura May Martin b. 27 May 1920, registered in Malling, Kent (J Quarter, Volume 02A Page 1800, with mother's maiden name THOMPSON), was baptised on 22 Jun 1920, at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster.
That Mabel may have named her daughter after Lady Waterlow might indicate that there had been a particular friendship between employer and employee.

Harry Martin served as a Motor Driver & Mechanic during the First World War, having enlisted on 22 May 1916 at Whitehall, aged 31, in the Army Service Corps (M.T.) At that time he was 5 ft 9¼ in, weighed 140 lbs.

In 1921, Harry Martin (37) Motor Car and Electric Light Attendant; Mabel Grace Martin (40) and Laura May Martin (1) were living at Dairy Cottage, Fairseat, Nr Wrotham, Stansted, Kent.

Harry Martin died, at 37, on 20 December 1921 and was buried, on Christmas Eve, at Stansted (Saint Mary the Virgin) Churchyard (Kent). His military record states that he had developed valvular heart disease after suffering pneumonia - for which he was admitted to Stourbridge Military Hospital in 1919 - and gives his cause of death as "Pulmonary Tuberculosis. Mitral Stenosis." 

One cannot help noticing a great similarity in the style of Harry's grave site and that of the later grave of Sir Philip Hickson Waterlow (who died at Trosley Towers, Wrotham in 1931 and is also buried in Stansted Churchyard), which leads me to speculate that the Waterlows may have arranged their employee's burial. There is a note on the burial record, which says, "ex soldier died at Grosvenor Sanatorium, Kennington nr Ashford". It was used to treat Imperial soldiers & sailors suffering from tuberculosis during WW1.

Mabel Grace Martin (47) married Arthur John Stedman (51) at the parish of St James, Piccadilly, on 31 Jul 1926. Arthur John Stedman, bap. 7 Apr 1872 in Cobham, Surrey, was the son of John Stedman and Mary Ann (Marianne) Elvina Silvester (m. 1867 in Kingston, Surrey). Arthur's first wife, Harriet Jane Judge, who he married in Epsom, Surrey in 1909, had died on 18 Aug 1925 and is buried in Cobham Cemetery. Arthur John Stedman was a bricklayer, as had been his father and Mabel's father, Dan Tompson.

Arthur John Stedman died on 5 July 1938, leaving his estate to Mabel Grace.

In 1939, Mabel Grace Stedman, widowed, housekeeper, was living at 1 Pemry Villas, Elm Grove Road, Cobham, Surrey, with daughter, Laura May Martin, Ladies Hairdresser; Gerald Owen Weston (mechanic and lorry driver) and Mabel's sister, Sarah Sophia, 'Daisy' S S Kritzer, housekeeper.

Mabel Grace Stedman, formerly Martin, née Tompson, died in the 1st quarter of 1967, in the district of Surrey North Western, in her 89th year.

Thursday 14 December 2023

Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton

Castle Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/6587133

Alfred Beamer, Private RMLI of Cecil Street, Plymouth, son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Emily Luxton, daughter of James Luxton and Anna Maria Hawkins, on 14 Dec 1905, at St Paul's Church, Tiverton. Emily's address at the time of the marriage was Heathcoat Square, Tiverton and her younger sister, Jessie Luxton, was a witnesses (bridesmaid perhaps).

Alfred and Emily's son, Alfred James, was born on 15 Mar 1908 and baptised on 29 Mar 1908 at St Peter’s Church, Stonehouse, Plymouth. But the infant died, in the third quarter of 1908, having bearly reached six months of age.

Alfred Beamer, who had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 15 Aug 1896, just shy of his 16th birthday, was discharged, invalided, on 15 Oct 1908. On 7 Mar 1909, Alfred Beamer (29) Labourer of 40 Neswick St, Plymouth, was admitted to the Devon and Cornwall Sanatorium for Consumptives Didworthy. Consumption was another name for Tuberculosis. When he was discharged from the sanitorium on 15 Jun 1909, the record shows Alfred developed the disease 7 months previously, which ties in with the date he was discharged from the Royal Marines. In the notes it says, "light work - dead".

Such a concession! What kind of light work can the dead do, FFS? 

By 1911, Emily Beamer (28), widow, had returned to Tiverton, at 1 Melbourne Street and was again working at the Heathcoat Lace Factory, as a spinner.

In 1912, Emily Beamer remarried to a John Heard, in Tiverton. 

In 1921, John Heard (49) Labourer from Oakford Devon, Emily Heard (39), and John's two children from his previous marriage (to Lily Holmes in 1901, who died in 1911), Beatrice Lily Heard (19) Lace Folder (at Heathcoat) and Sidney John Heard (13) were living at 125, West Exe South, Tiverton.

John Heard died, aged 59, in Exeter.

In 1939, Emily Heard, widow, was living with a single lady, Beatrice E Gollop, at 26 Castle Street, Tiverton

Emily Heard died, in Tiverton, in 1962, aged 79.

Monday 6 November 2023

George Hockley and Eliza Crow

St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow, Essex - Chancel
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/1304114

George Hockley, son of Daniel Hockley and Sophia Mason, married Eliza Crow, daughter of William Crow and Judith Doe on 6 Nov 1843 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow. The marriage record shows that George, as well as both fathers' were labourers and witnesses were John and Jane Burton.

George and Eliza's children included: 

  1. William Crow bap. 17 Nov 1842 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  2. Tamar Hockley b. 1844 M Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 75 (Tamar as a female given name) (No baptism found)
  3. Daniel Hockley b. 1845 S Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 71, bap. 12 May 1850  at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  4. Elizabeth Hockley b. 1847 J Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 79, bap. 9 Aug 1857 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  5. James Hockley b. 24 Apr 1849 (1849 J Qtr in DUNMOW UNION Vol 12 Page 22), bap. 10 Jun 1849 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  6. Emma Hockley b. 1851 M Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 12 Page 90, bap 13 Apr 1851 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  7. Lucy Hockley b. 1852 S Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 283, bap. 8 Aug 1852 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  8. Charles Hockley b. 1854 J Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 326, bap. 9 Jul 1854 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  9. Alice Hockley b. 1855 D Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 282, bap. 11 Nov 1855 St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
  10. Sarah Ann Hockley b. 1857 J Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 337, bap. 9 Aug 1857 St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow
On the baptism record for William, son of Eliza Crow, Single Woman, her address was listed as "Dunmow Union House", i.e. the workhouse. Listed as William Crow, at 19, he married as and thereafter used William Hockley

The mother's maiden name is listed on the birth registrations as CROW, except Daniel Hockley, with mother's maiden name listed as "Cross". 


George Hockley, Agricultural Labourer, died on 12 Jul 1857, aged just 42, at Halfway House, from the all-too-common cause, Phthisis (Tuberculosis (TB)) and was buried on 17 Jul 1857, in Great Dunmow.

Clearly Sarah Ann and Elizabeth were baptised after their father's death.

In 1861, Eliza Hockley (40), was living at Phreaders Green, Great Dunmow with sons, William Crow (19) and Daniel Hockley (14), both Agricultural Labourers presumably supporting their mother and their younger siblings: Elizabeth Hockley (12), James Hockley (10), Emma Hockley (8), Lucy Hockley (7), Charles Hockley (6), Alice Hockley (5) and Sarah (3). Tamar Hockley (16) was then a House maid in the employ of Francis Berrington Crittall (36) 'Ironmonger' (founder of Crittall Windows) in Bank Street, Braintree

In 1871, at High Street, Park Corner, Great Dunmow, there were Eliza Hockley (39) - erm, nope, she was 50 - Charwoman, with Charles Hockley (16) Farm Lab and Sarah Hockley (12) Domestic Servant. Daniel Hockley (21) Groom, was living at The Cottage, Great Canfield, Dunmow; Elizabeth Hockley (20ish), who had given birth to an illegitimate daughter, Ada Elizabeth Hockley (1) (b. 1869 D Quarter in ISLINGTON, bap. 1 May 1873, at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow), were listed as Inmates of Dunmow Union Workhouse; Emma Hockley (19) was General servant to Samuel Knight, Architect at Maitland Park Villas, St Pancras, London. Lucy Hockley (19) was a Housemaid at 38 Upper Park Road, Belsize Park; while Alice Hockley (14) was a domestic servant to William Stacey, Photographer and Florist, in The Causeway, Great Dunmow.

Eliza Hockley, daughter of William Crow, married William Bloomfield, widower, son of Robert Bloomfield, in Felsted, on 20 Apr 1872.

(It hasn't been possible to find William Bloomfield's baptism, however, he'd previously married Mary Ann Harsant (bap. 1 Apr 1821 in Peasenhall, Suffolk), in 1839, in Blything registration district. In 1841, William Bloomfield (20) Blacksmith, Mary Ann (20) and their daughter Lucy (1) were in the High Street, Moulsham, Chelmsford. In 1851, William Bloomfield (32) Blacksmith, with Mary Ann (30) and Lucy (11) were back in Stoven, Blything, Suffolk. In 1861, William Bloomfield (43) Jobbing smith (with wife listed as Maria and daughter as Lizzie: probably misheard) were living at Bridge End Road, Great Bardfield, Dunmow. And by 1871, William Bloomfield (50) Blacksmith, Mary Ann (49) and Lucy (29) had moved to Church End, Great Dunmow. Then Mary Ann Bloomfield died, aged 49, and was buried, on 26 Aug 1871, at Holy Cross, Felsted. Lucy Bloomfield just disappears.)

Charles Hockley, then 23, Groom from Great Dunmow, Essex, enlisted in the 20th Hussars at London, on 2 Jul 1877. At that time being 5ft 6in, with a fresh complexion, grey eyes and brown hair. He transferred to the 10th Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own) on 31 Oct 1879, which ultimately meant he saw action at the Battle of El Teb, 29 Feb 1884 (First and Second Battles of El Teb) during the Mahdist War in what was then Mahdist Sudan. This action earned him the Sudan Medal 1884 (Egypt Medal) with clasp El Teb, as well as a Khedive Star 1884. From 11 Dec 1879 to 18 Feb 1884, Charles had been in the East Indies, first in Rawalpindi and then Mian Mir: "The four-week march was arduous and hampered by lack of healthy camels. They had to cross the rivers Jhelum and Chenab, and camped several days at Shaddera near Lahore." In November, they were ordered to re-locate again, to Lucknow, where the 10th were located near the ruined Dilkusha Palace. "There was a large European population at Lucknow during the cooler months so that a good social life was enjoyed." [Source] As proof of that, in Nov 1881, in Lucknow, Charles was treated for a dose of that well-known soldiers' "recreational hazard", Gonorrhea. The 10th travelled to Sudan aboard HMS Jumna 1884 and disembarked on 19 Feb 1884, where Charles' record locates him until 21 Apr 1884. Amongst sprains and dislocations, Charles also suffered Jaundice in 1879, ague (malaria or another illness involving fever and shivering) on no less than four occasions in 1880 and 1881 and Dysentery while in Suakin in 1884. Charles' next of kin is listed as his mother, Eliza Bloomfield at Glengall Road, Poplar - the address of her eldest son, William Hockley (born Crow). He left the army in 1885.

In 1881, William Bloomfield (62) Blacksmith, born in Dunwich, Suffolk, and Eliza Bloomfield (55), were at Cottage Farm, Banister Green, Felstead. Elizabeth Hockley (28), Ada Hockley (12) and Joseph James Hockley (0) - born on 7 Mar 1881, Elizabeth's second illegitimate child - were all Pauper Inmates at the Union Workhouse, Great Dunmow. (Joseph James Hockley was baptised on 16 Jun 1882 at St Mary the Virgin, Great Dunmow, with their address given at that time as Dunmow Union Workhouse Felsted.)

In 1891, William (73) and Eliza Bloomfield (64) were at Cock Green, Felsted. Elizabeth Hockley (38) Pauper inmate was once more at Dunmow Union Workhouse, with son, [Joseph] James Hockley (10). Charles Hockley (35) was working as a Valet and residing in Arlington Road, St Pancras, London.

William Bloomfield died, aged 76, in 1893 D Quarter in DUNMOW UNION Volume 04A Page 407. 

In 1901, Eliza Bloomfield (it claims she was 75) widow living on children, was still living in Felsted. Elizabeth Hockley (49) was Housekeeper to Walter Howland at Silverleys, Straits Lane, Felstead, while Ada Hockley (32) born in Islington was back in The Dunmow Union Workhouse as a Pauper Inmate; Charles Hockley (46) from Great Dunmow, Essex was a Boarder in the household of Robert Bailey a Cadet servant (military academy) at 10, James Street, Woolwich, London. Charles was working as an Arsenal labourer (Royal Arsenal, Woolwich). (Robert Bailey, from Huddersfiled, Yorkshire had served, from 1867 to 1888, in the 109th Regiment of Foot (Bombay Infantry).

Charles Hockley died, at 50, in 1904 in the London Borough of Southwark.

Eliza Bloomfield died in 1906 M Quarter in BILLERICAY Volume 04A Page 319, with her age estimated as 84. She will have been 86.

In 1911, Elizabeth Hockley (64) and Ada Hockley (43) Domestic servants were once again Inmates at the Dunmow Union Workhouse. This is the last record that can be found for either of them.

Sunday 23 July 2023

Henry William Stone and Sarah Snow and Jane Tarr

Huntsham : All Saints Church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/6039979

William Henry Stone (baptised Henry William) married Sarah Snow on 23 Jul 1879 at All Saints' Church, Huntsham. Witnesses were John Voisey and the bridegroom's sister, Mary Ann (Marrianne). Their daughter, Ellen Stone Snow had already been born at Putson Cottages, Blundells Road, Tiverton on 27 Feb 1879, to Sarah Snow, a Domestic Servant and in 1881, this child was living with Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway, listed as their granddaughter, because Sarah Stone, wife of Henry Stone a Farm Labourer, died on 22 Jan 1880, from Phthisis acuta (Acute tuberculosis), at Huntsham. Emma Maunder, sister, was present at her death. This explains why, in 1881, Henry Stone, was a widower, aged just 24, living alone at Little Fair Oak, Uplowman. 

At that same time, in Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway's household were two visitors: Mary Ann Tarr (27) and Jane Tarr (22), who were daughters of William Tarr, a Hostler, and his wife, Jane Wood, of Marsh Bridge Road, Dulverton, Somerset. Clearly they were there preparing for a wedding, because in Q2 of 1881, William Henry Stone married Jane Tarr.  

Henry and Jane Stone had four further children: 
  1. Frederick Henry Stone b. 1885, bap. 26 Apr 1885, son of Henry and Jane, at St Mary’s churchUffculme (Died 1887, see below)
  2. Francis Albert Stone b. 17 May 1886, bap. 15 Aug 1886 in Halberton
  3. Louisa Jane Stone b. 1888, bap. 26 Feb 1888 as Louisa Mary Jane Stone, at St Mary’s churchUffculme.
  4. Emma Katie Stone b. 3 Feb 1890 M Quarter in TIVERTON Volume 05B Page 432, bap. 12 Feb 1892 at St Peter's Church, Tiverton, the abode on the baptism record was Tiverton (Union), i.e. Workhouse
On 29 July 1887 The Western Times reported on the inquest into the accidental death of Frederick Henry Stone, 2½ yrs old, of Wellington Road, Uffculme, whose clothes caught fire, causing burns over his whole body, as did the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. This report of the inquest, which was held in the cottage where they lived, is hard reading.

THE SHOCKING DEATH OF A CHILD NEAR UFFCULME

The inquest touching the death of the child, Frederick Henry Stone, aged 2½ years, son of a labourer residing at Brickyard Cottage, Wellington Road, near Uffculme, was held by Mr. F. Burrow, district coroner, on Saturday, when the evidence of the mother, Mrs Potter, a neighbour, and Dr. Morgan, of Uffculme, was taken. It appeared that about 8 a.m. on Friday the mother, having lighted the kitchen fire, placed the child, which was wearing its night-dress, in a chair by the side of it. Her back was turned for a few moments, and in the meantime the nightdress, a long one, became ignited by a burning stick which fell out of the grate. On hearing the child scream the mother ran into the kitchen, and finding the nightdress in flames, endeavoured to smother them by throwing some woollen material around the child. Failing, however, in this attempt, she and her little girl called for assistance, Mrs Potter then came in and, according to her statement, found the child in the middle of the floor, getting up into its knees and enveloped in "a mass of flames from head to foot." With the exception of fragments, the nightdress and undergarments were then completely charred. She extinguished the flames upon what remained and then, with the assistance of other neighbours, the burns were treated with linseed oil and lime water. In the meantime Dr. Bryden, of Uffculme, was sent for, as also was Dr. Morgan. The latter arrived first, but not until the child had expired. In his evidence, Mr. Morgan said he entirely approved of the remedies applied and even had he been there more could not have been done. The extent and nature of the burns, involving as they did the whole body were sufficient to cause death. -- The father of the child was present at the earlier part of the enquiry, but as he persisted in interposing remarks he was ordered by the Coroner to withdraw. Subsequently he was recalled and allowed to make a statement, the Coroner holding that he was not in a fit state to be sworn. Stone complained very strongly that Dr. Bryden although called twice and promised to come down did not do so until it suited his convenience in the course of his usual round as parish doctor, which was an hour or more after death. Mentioning incidentally that Dr. Bryden had attended on previous occasions he said he owed him 7s 6d, which he declared he would never pay. -- The Coroner remarked that that was a matter between himself and Dr. Bryden. -- It transpired that the child was insured in the Prudential Insurance Company. -- The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death."
William Henry Stone, Farm Labourer of Halberton, died, aged 33, on 11 Aug 1889, at the Infirmary Tiverton from Cardiac disease and oedema of the lungs (Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure.) 

In 1891, Jane Stone (32), Francis Albert Stone (5), Louisa Mary Jane Stone (4) and Emma Katie Stone (1) were all listed as Inmates at the Tiverton Union Workhouse. Ellen Snow (12) was again living with her grandfather, going by her mother's surname, even though her parents subsequently married. 

Jane Stone, Widow, married William Staddon at Uffculme Parish Church on 11 Oct 1899. William Staddon, Widower, son of William Staddon and Jane Babbage, had been blind from birth. (He'd previously married Leah Parr, in Halberton, on 30 Mar 1871. Leah Staddon died, at 51, in 1897.)

In 1901, William Staddon (51), Jane Staddon (42), Lucy Stone [Louisa Mary Jane] (13), Emma Stone (11) and Richard Takel (59) Boarder were living in Bridge Street, Uffculme. Ellen S Stone (22), was a Domestic Cook at a Private Girls School at 19, St Peter Street, Tiverton, Devon.

In 1911, in Kitwell Street, Uffculme were William Staddon (52) Basket Maker, from Uplowman, Devon, with Jane Staddon (52) from Dulverton, along with his son Tom Staddon (32) and Henry Wright (45) Boarder. 

In 1921, with address just listed as 'Halberton' were William Staddon (73) Basket Maker (retired); Jane Staddon (62) and Doris Irene Harding (11) Granddaughter - actually Jane's granddaughter, daughter of Emma Katie Stone, who had married Reginald Herbert Harding in 1909.

William Staddon died in 1925 J Qtr in TIVERTON Vol 05B Page 466.

There's a death of a Jane Staddon of the right age and vintage who died, aged 78, in 1937 J Quarter in MERTHYR TYDFIL Volume 11A Page 598. 

Sunday 16 July 2023

John Thomas Wykes and Mary Ann Mercury

Classic Trains South Africa
Image by Martin Hatchuel from Pixabay

John Thomas Wykes (b. 1864 in Deptford, London), son of William Wykes and Elizabeth Thompson, married Mary Ann Mercury at Baptist Church, Cape Town, South Africa on 16 Jul 1889. John Thomas' job was listed as Waiter.

The couple had five children:
  1. Elizabeth Lilian Wykes b. 13 Mar 1890, bap. (as Elizabeth Mary) on 28 May 1891 in Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
  2. William Ernest Wykes b. 7 Aug 1892 in Germiston, bap. 9 Oct 1892 in Transvaal, South Africa
  3. Martha Ethel Wykes b. 12 Feb 1894 in Germiston, died aged 20 days and was buried, on 4 Mar 1894 in Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa
  4. John Thomson Wykes b. 16 Sep 1896 in Germiston, Transvaal, South Africa, bap. on 26 Sep 1896 at St Boniface Church, Germiston
  5. Jessie Harriet Wykes b. 18 Mar 1898 in Germiston, Transvaal, South Africa, bap. on 15 Apr 1898 at St Boniface Church, Germiston. Died, aged 3, in Apr-May-Jun 1901, in Greenwich, London.
On the baptisms of the first four children, John Thomas' occupation was listed as Engine Driver, on Jessie's, as a Fitter. John Thomas Wykes' sister, Martha O'Toole, was a sponsor at John Thomson Wykes' baptism in 1896.

Mary Mercury Wykes of 62 Chapel Street, Cape Town, died, aged 34, on 21 Sep 1899 from Phthisis (Tuberculosis). The record of her death lists that she was from Saint Helena and was of mixed race.

In 1901, Lily Wykes (11), Willie Wykes (8) and Jessie Wykes (3) were in the household of John Thomas' sister, Elizabeth Burch, in Deptford, London. Also there was Martha O'Toole, who I imagine took the children to England.

John Wykes, widower, engineer, remarried, on 3 Oct 1901, to Esther Mercury at St Mark's, Cape Town. Born Esther Margaret Mercury on 19 June 1870 in Saint Helena, daughter of Francis Mercury and Rachel Michael, it is highly likely that she was either Mary Ann Mercury's sister, or her cousin.

But Esther Wykes (née Mercury) of 5 Osborne St, Cape Town, died, aged 33, on 21 May 1904, also from Phthisis (Tuberculosis). The record of her death also confirms that she was from Saint Helena and was of mixed race.

In 1911, Elizabeth Wykes (21) Domestic and William Wykes (18) Stationer's Clerk, both born in South Africa, were Boarders in the household of John Trigg (59) Mantle Maker at 388 Evelyn St, Deptford.

John Thomas Wykes, South African Railway Pensioner on 72 Drake Road, Durban, died, aged 87, on 15 Apr 1951 at Addington Hospital Durban.

  • Elizabeth Lilian Wykes married Walter James Fisher on 10 Feb 1916, at St Paul's, Deptford. Walter James Fisher (25) of 388 Evelyn St, Deptford, enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery on 29 Feb 1916. He survived two tours in France in 1917-18 and 1918-19. Their daughter, Peggie Irene Fisher was born on 9 Apr 1921 J Quarter in ST. OLAVE (BERMONDSEY) Volume 01D Page 298. In 1939, Walter J Fisher (b. 9 Apr 1890) Clothier Manager; Lilian E Fisher and Peggy I Fisher lived at 16 Sanderstead Road, Leyton, Essex. Walter James Fisher of 43 Greenhays Drive, South Woodford died on 17 Jan 1958. Lilian Elizabeth Fisher of 43 Greenhays Drive, South Woodford died on 17 Jun 1967.
  • William Ernest Wykes married Martha Irene Griffiths (b. 23 Dec 1890) daughter of Seth Griffiths, Police Sargent and Elizabeth Harries, also in the 1st quarter of 1916, in Greenwich. They had four sons: Leonard William Wykes b. 31 Jan 1923; John Stanley Wykes b. 31 May 1924; Walter Seth Wykes b. 1 Nov 1926 and Alan David Michael Wykes b. 1 Nov 1934. In 1939, the two older boys were at home with their parents at 46 Canmore Gardens, Wandsworth, while the two younger ones were at the Pier Hotel, Cavendish Place, Eastbourne, Sussex, presumably evacuated. Their eldest son, Sergeant Leonard William Wykes, 466 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve was killed in action on 22 Jan 1944 when his aircraft was shot down at De Lutte 2 miles east of Oldenzaal, Netherlands, close to the German border, during a raid on Magdeburg. Martha I Wykes died, at 66, in 1957 in Streatham. William Ernest Wykes died, in 1977, in Thanet, Kent.