Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Heathcoat Fabrics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Heathcoat Fabrics. Show all posts

Wednesday, 25 August 2021

Sidney Ridgeway and Lucy Headford

St Andrew Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1546985

Sidney Ridgeway, son of Thomas Ridgway and Ann Tooze, married Lucy Headford (b. 3 Jan 1886), daughter of George Headford and Ellen Baker, in Tiverton, in 1908. In 1901, Lucy, living at Cosways Buildings, 7, Westexe South, Tiverton, with her widowed mother and siblings, was working as a Wheelwinder, while her mother was a Silk hand and her sister a Silk winder: all occupations that suggest they were employed at the Heathcoat Fabrics factory.

Sidney and Lucy had two children: 
  1. Charles Ridgeway born 29 May 1908
  2. Beatrice Maud Ridgeway born 21 Jun 1910
In 1911, Sidney Ridgeway (28) Woodman on estate, Lucy Ridgeway (24), Charles (2) and Beatrice (0) were living at 2 Langwood, Cove, Tiverton.

Charles Ridgeway married Dorothy Ellen Lazarus in Tiverton, in 1932.

Beatrice Ridgeway married Malcolm Garfield Huish in 1935.

In 1939, Sidney Ridgeway, 'Electric Wireman at the Municipal Electric Works', Lucy Ridgeway and Lily Headford, Incapacitated (Lucy's younger sister), were living in Higher Rock Close, St Andrew Street, Tiverton. In a separate household in Higher Rock Close, were Malcolm G Huish, 'General Labourer Gas & Electricity Works', Beatrice Huish and their daughter, Marion. Charles Ridgeway, 'Gas Worker' and Dorothy Ellen Ridgeway, lived at 9 Hammett Square.

Lucy Ridgeway died, in Tiverton, in 1949, aged 64. Sidney Ridgeway died, in Tiverton, in 1957, aged 75. Charles Ridgeway died, in Tiverton, in 1973, at 65, and Beatrice Huish, in 1975, also at the age of 65, in Sedgemoor, Somerset.

Wednesday, 18 August 2021

Louis William Kerslake, Beatrice Hoare & Nellie Bridle, and the tragic death of William John Bridle Kerslake (17)

Tiverton : Bampton Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/6474556

Nellie Bridle, only child of William Bridle and Lucy Jane Stone, married Louis William Kerslake, son of John Kerslake and Mary Ann Beedell, in Tiverton, in 1931. Their only child, William John Bridle Kerslake, was born 21 Apr 1932.

But this was not Lewis William's first marriage: On 25 Dec 1908, William Kerslake had married Beatrice Hoare, daughter of Samuel Hoare and Mary Elizabeth Noble, at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. They had a daughter, Beatrice Gwendolen Kerslake, born 16 March 1909 and baptised, on 19 Jun 1909, also at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. On the baptism record, her father is listed as Lewis William Kerslake, Tailor, which confirms this is the same man. We find William Kerslake (25) Tailor, Beatrice Kerslake (22) and Gwendolen Kerslake (2), in 1911, living with Beatrice's parents at 1 Richards Buildings, [Bampton Street], Tiverton. Beatrice Kerslake died later in 1911, aged just 23. 

Electoral Registers confirm that Louis William moved back to live with his widowed mother, Mary Ann Kerslake, at The Works, Tiverton and was still there in 1930. At the same time, the 1930 Kelly's Directory listed Kerslake, Lewis Wm. tailor, at 72a, Bampton Street & 1 Newport Street, Tiverton

111 Chapel Street, Tiverton (with the white door)

In 1939, Lewis W Kerslake, Air Ministry Contractor Fabric Work - he was a materials inspector, undoubtedly working on parachute fabrics at the Heathcoat factory - Nellie Kerslake and William J B Kerslake, were living with Nellie's widowed mother, Lucy J Bridle, at 111 Chapel Street, Tiverton.

Tiverton : Mill Leat
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/6253823
Mill Leat providing water for the nearby Heathcoat Factory.

Then on 24 Aug 1949, their only son, Billy Kerslake, died, as reported on the front page of the Western Morning News, 25 Aug 1949:

TIVERTON BOY DIES IN LEAT

WENT FOR BATHE

A shock from an electric cable is believed to have caused the death last night of 17-year-old William Kerslake, son of Mr and Mrs L W Kerslake, of 111 Chapel Street, Tiverton. Kerslake in a bathing costume, was in a fairly shallow part of the leat running behind the old Heathcoat School, Tiverton, when he was seen to collapse. Mr Tom Pook, of Kings Crescent, Tiverton and Mr W Copp, of 2 Bridge Buildings, Tiverton, went fully clothed to his rescue and tried artificial respiration. Dr G Lowe and Dr P F Haggart were summoned but it was found that the boy was dead. Assistance was also given by Constable D F Levett.
The subsequent newspaper report after the inquest and funeral took up almost four columns. Much was made of it being private property. Today, I feel, much more emphasis would be placed on why there was a live, broken, unmaintained, dangerous electrical cable dangling in water where kids could access.

TRAGEDY IN LEAT

YOUNG BATHER IS ELECTROCUTED
CORONER'S WARNING TO PARENTS

William John Bridle Kerslake, 17-year old shop assistant, 111 Chapel Street, Tiverton, was killed instantaneously when he grasped a live 230 volt electric cable while bathing, on Wednesday evening, in the Factory Leat of Messrs. John Heathcoat and Company Ltd.

At the inquest at the Tiverton and District Hospital on Saturday morning, the dangers of swimming in the Leat were stressed by the Coroner (Mr J A Young), who said, "Quite apart from the fact that it is private property, it is not a suitable playground for anybody, as there are other dangers quite apart from the unusual danger which caused this tragedy. Parents should prevent children from going there."
Sadly, the boys seemed to have first though that it was an electric eel.

Giving evidence at the inquest, Billy Kerslake's friend, Thomas Percival Stratford, had said, "An eel came by me where the electricity was and touched my legs. I nearly fell over. I said to Bill that I had felt something like an electric eel and he laughed." "He saw the wire hanging down ... the end of it was in the water. He said 'Perhaps that is causing the trouble?' He started to pull the wire up ... he must have touched a bare spot. He screamed and shot up into the air."

THE FUNERAL

Many tokens of sympathy

William was the only son of Mr and Mrs L W Kerslake. He took a leading part in many local organisations. He was a Patrol Leader of the 1st Tiverton Scouts and a member of the Tiverton Platoon of the Devon Army Cadet Force. A good athlete, he was a member of the Tiverton Harriers and the Tiverton Swimming Club. He was a member of Elmore Church, of which he was formerly a choir-boy.

Chapel Street was in mourning for the funeral on Saturday [27 Aug 1949]. A service, conducted by the Rector (the Rev W E Lane), assisted by Mr E Penny, was held in Elmore Church.

The cortege was met at the cemetery gate by a guard of honour of the Tiverton Platoon of the Devon Army Cadet Force and Councillor H Lee and Messrs B Homer and G Woodward, representing the Tiverton Swimming Club. At the grave side was a guard of honour of the 1st Tiverton Scouts under Scoutmaster J Gollop. [...] 

Chief mourners included: Mr and Mrs L W Kerslake (parents); Mr H Kerslake (uncle); Tom Stratford (friend); Mr & Mrs C Burt, Mr and Mrs E Kerslake and Mrs J Bowden and Mrs C Kerslake (uncles and aunts); Mr C Ridgeway, Miss J Burt and Mrs and Miss Northcott (cousins).

Mrs Kerslake (grandmother) was unable to attend. [She was 91 by then.] Her floral tribute read, "Till we meet again", with fondest love from Gran and Auntie Jenny (Jane Bowden).

Lewis William Kerslake of 111 Chapel Street, Tiverton, died on 18 Dec 1971. Nellie Kerslake of Belmont Hospital, Tiverton, Devon, died on 15 Aug 1982.

Tiverton: Belmont Hospital
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/666559
Former 
Victorian workhouse in Belmont Road, before the redevelopment. After the Second World War it was utilised as a hospital, providing specialist care for the elderly.

Monday, 9 August 2021

William Northcott and Emma Jane Wood

Fore Street, Cullompton with the grade II listed White Hart
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen McKay - geograph.org.uk/p/5497724

William Northcott married Emma Jane Wood, daughter of Henry Wood and Mary Jane Melhuish from Kentisbeare, Devon, in 1896. Five years earlier, in 1891, William Northcott (19) Blacksmith, had been a lodger at The White Hart, Fore Street, Cullompton, but I haven't been able to find him before that. 

William and Emma's children included: 
  1. Maud Wood, Emma's illegitimate daughter, born 1894 and baptised on 19 Feb 1895, when she was 14 months old, in Kentisbeare
  2. William Henry Northcott born 8 Mar 1897 (not seen after 1911)
  3. Arthina Northcott born 14 Oct 1898, bap. 2 Nov 1898 in Cullompton
  4. Elizabeth Northcott born 1900 (died 1900 aged 0)
  5. Charles John Northcott born 23 Feb 1902, bap. 23 Mar 1902
  6. Albert James Northcott born 30 Aug 1903, bap. 16 Sep 1903 in Cullompton (died 1904, aged 0)
  7. Florence Northcott born 25 Oct 1907, Emma's illegitimate daughter
The retreat, Cullompton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/4955997
The neighbouring house in the row on the left, also listed, is Church Cottage.

In 1901, William Northcott (31) Blacksmith Journeyman from Branscombe, Devon (not identified relevant birth), wife Emma Jane (30) from Kentisbeare, along with Emma's daughter, Maud Wood (7), William Henry Northcott (4) and Arthenia Northcott (2) were living at Church Cottages, Cullompton.

William Northcott (33) died and was buried on 15 May 1904, in Cullompton.

Charles John Northcott was registered at Elmore School, Tiverton in 1908, with his address shown as Elmore Workhouse. In 1911, Emma Northcote (sic) (37) Widow, Laundress was living at 7 Rices Court, West Exe South, Tiverton with William (14) Errand Boy, Arthina (12), Charles (9) and Florence (3). 

Charles John Northcott (17) joined the Royal Tank Corps on 19 Aug 1919.

In 1917, Emma J Northcott had remarried to Arthur Southcott. What were the chances?

Arthur Southcott, born 30 Jul 1883, bap. 9 Aug 1883 at St Peter’s Church Tiverton, therefore 12 years younger than his wife, was the son of Frederick Southcott and Eliza Harris

Arthur Southcott died in 1935, in his early 50's.

In 1939, Emma J Southcott, Widowed again, was living at 7 Bartows Causeway, Tiverton with Dorothy A Evans (Arthina Northcott had married Ernest F J Evans in 1918), Laundress, and Dorothy Florence Northcott (b. 16 Nov 1916 - mother's maiden name was Northcott, so appears to be Arthina's illegitimate daughter), who worked at the Lace Factory and one other person. Emma Jane Southcott died in 1947. 

Tiverton : Bartows Causeway
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/5699381

Friday, 30 July 2021

George Burt and Fanny Jerwood

Tiverton : St Peter's Church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/1654824

George Burt married Fanny Jerwood on 25 Dec 1884 at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. George Burt's Rank or Profession was given as Sailor. Fanny Jerwood was the daughter of John Jerwood (b. 1830), Labourer and his wife Sarah Davey (who had also married at St Peter's on 31 May 1853). George Burt's father is listed on the marriage certificate as William Burt, Labourer, however, this looks like an error as records suggest George's father was Edward Burt. As his father had died when George was two, he would never have known him.

On 26 Nov 1837, Edward Burt (b. 1816), son of Richard Burt, had married Mary Ann Prescott (b. 1821), daughter of John Prescott and Ann Warren, also at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. In 1841 they were living in Bampton Street, Tiverton with son George Burt (b. 1840). By 1851, Edward Burt (34) Labourer and Mary Ann (30), had added Edward (b. 1842), John (b. 1846), Richard (b. 1848) and William (b. 1851). Living with them was Mary Carter (71) Lodger. 

In 1859, the son George born in 1840, died, aged 19.

George Burt, born 1863, was actually registered as Sidney George Burt.

Their father, Edward Burt, then died, in 1866, in Tiverton, aged 50. 

In 1870, listed simply as George Burt (Sidney is never used again), son of a widow from Bampton Street, he was registered at Heathcote School.

In 1871, Mary Ann Burt (50) Widow, Seamstress, was still living in Bampton Street with her children: John (25) Mason's Labourer, Lucy (19) Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory, Charlotte (17) Laundress, James (11) and George (7), both at School. Emily Peters (19) also Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory and her son Berty Peters (2) were Lodging with them. Mary Ann Burt died in 1877, aged 56.

And so, George Burt, born 4 Nov 1863, enlisted in the Royal Navy, at 15, as a Boy 2nd Class on 8 Apr 1879. He served until 1 Nov 1901 and joined the Royal Fleet Reserve on 18 Aug 1902. He was brought back into service on 2 Aug 1914 until 18 Jul 1917, although at shore establishments HMS Vivid (II and III). 

HMS Superb (1875)

In 1881, George Burt (17) Boy 1st Class was with the 1st Class Iron Screw Ship HMS Superb (1875), moored in Valletta (Grand Harbour), Malta.

George and Fanny's only child, Charles Edward Burt, was born on 4 Dec 1887.

In 1891, Fanny Burt (27) with son Charlie (3), were living at 150 Pembroke Street, Devonport, while George was with HMS Amphion (1883) in the Pacific.

Young Charlie was then enrolled at Heathcote School in 1894 and at that time, his mother's address was Melbourne Street, Tiverton, even though George was predominantly in Devonport in 1894, first with HMS Himalaya (1854) and then at HMS Vivid II, joining HMS Grafton (1892) on 23 Oct 1894.

In 1901, George Burt (38), now a Leading Stoker, was again at HMS Vivid II, before being pensioned on 1 Nov that year. Fanny (37) was living at 2, Wellbrook Street, Prospect Place, Tiverton, with Charles (13) now a Silk lace maker and Sarah Jerwood (70) Widow, Boarder (Fanny's mother.)

Sarah Jerwood having died in 1910, in 1911, George Burt (48) Grocer and dealer, wife Fanny (47) Assisting in the business and son Charles Edward Burt (23) Lace machine hand, were living at 24 Wellbrook St, Tiverton.

George Burt died in Tiverton in 1937, aged 73.

Fanny Burt died in 1938, aged 74.

Tiverton: Wellbrook Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/1993212

Thursday, 1 July 2021

Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton

St Paul Street and St Paul's Church, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/3417969

Alfred Beamer, Private RMLI of Cecil Street, Plymouth, son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Emily Luxton (b. 22 Jun 1882, bap. 9 Jul 1882, at St Peter’s Church Tiverton), daughter of James Luxton and Anna Maria Hawkins, on 14 Dec 1905, at St Paul's Church, Tiverton. Emily's address at the time of the marriage was Heathcoat Square, Tiverton. Emily's younger sister, Jessie Luxton, was one of the witnesses (bridesmaid perhaps).

Emily's father, Sergeant James Luxton (b. 1841 in Taunton, Somerset), had served in the British Army for 13 years, 320 days, with the 10th Reg Of Foot between 1860 and 1874. He spent over nine years serving abroad in the Cape of Good Hope, St Helena, Japan, China and the Straits Settlements. He was discharged in 1874 as he had been found unfit for further service. On the 1881 census, James Luxton (40), described himself as Grocer (Chelsea Pensioner) in Bampton Street, Tiverton. James Luxton died in 1886, aged just 45.

In 1891, Emily lived in Sewards Court, Leat Street, Tiverton, where her widowed mother worked as a silk lace mender and all of her older siblings worked at the lace factory (Heathcoat Lace Factory, Tiverton, Devon) - her brother Arthur being a machine boy there already at age 10. By 1901, Emily and her younger sister, Jessie, had become silk winders, working at the lace factory too.

Former workers' housing, Heathcoat Square, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk/p/6690635

Alfred and Emily's son, Alfred James, was born on 15 Mar 1908 and baptised on 29 Mar 1908 at St Peter’s Church, Stonehouse, Plymouth. But the infant died, in the third quarter of 1908, having bearly reached six months of age.

Alfred Beamer, who had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 15 Aug 1896, just shy of his 16th birthday, was discharged, invalided, on 15 Oct 1908. On 7 Mar 1909, Alfred Beamer (29) Labourer of 40 Neswick St, Plymouth, was admitted to the Devon and Cornwall Sanatorium for Consumptives Didworthy

Consumption was another name for Tuberculosis. The record shows that Alfred had first developed the disease 7 months previously - which ties in with the date he was discharged from the Royal Marines - when he was discharged from the sanitorium on 15 Jun 1909. In the notes it says, "light work - dead".

Such a concession! What kind of light work can the dead do, FFS? 

By 1911, Emily Beamer (28), widow, had returned to Tiverton, at 1 Melbourne Street and was again working at the Heathcoat Lace Factory, as a spinner.

In the 4th quarter of 1912, Emily Beamer remarried to a John Heard, in Tiverton. The couple don't appear to have any children. I've not been able to identify when John Heard died, but by 1939, Emily had been widowed again and was living with a single lady, Beatrice E Gollop, at 26 Castle Street, Tiverton

Emily Heard died, in Tiverton, in 1962, aged 79.

Castle Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/6587133

If you're related to any of the people written about, I'm guessing you'll recognise them from the surnames. If you are, do please get in touch.