Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label World War I. Show all posts
Showing posts with label World War I. Show all posts

Saturday, 31 July 2021

William Henry Middleton and Alice Maud Osmond

Admiralty Mews, Deal
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Philip Halling - geograph.org.uk/p/1407334

William Henry Middleton
, son of Emma Middleton, married Alice Maud Osmond in Tiverton in 1918. Alice Maud, known as Maud, born 2 Nov 1888 and baptised 23 Dec 1888 at St. Mary, Willand, was the daughter of John Osmond (son of Henry Osmond from Halberton) and Annie Osmond (daughter of John Osmond of Willand) - it's likely her parents were cousins.

In 1891, John Osmond (29), Annie (34) lived in a cottage in Kentisbeare, Devon along with daughters Alice M (2) and Emily M (0). At that time, William Henry (2) was living with his grandmother, Jane How at Habridge Cottages, Steart Road, Stoodleigh, Tiverton.

By 1901, however, when Maud (13) was still at home with her family, then living at 1, Crosslands [Cottages], Halberton, William Henry (13) had already left home and was employed as an Agricultural Labourer by John Hussey (38) Farmer at Wood & Honeyland, Tiverton. (Honeyland Plantation?)

William Henry "Bill" Middleton, born 10 Dec 1889, then enrolled in the Royal Marines on 4 Nov 1907, at Exeter (his record says was underage between then an 9 Dec 1907), and was sent off to the Royal Marine Depot, Deal until 2 Oct 1908, before being sent to Plymouth Division. William Henry was promoted to Corporal in 1911, and Sergeant in 1916 while serving on HMS Roxburgh (1904), which he was with from 4 Jun 1912 until 13 Aug 1916 - she was hit by a torpedo on 20 Jun 1915 but escaped with serious damage to her bow - latterly at the North America and West Indies Station.

From 13 Apr 1917 until 26 Nov 1918, Bill was with HMS Highflyer (1898), which means that he was present in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the Halifax Explosion on 6 Dec 1917. "Royal Navy cruisers in port sent some of the first organized rescue parties ashore. HMS Highflyer, along with the armed merchant cruisers HMS Changuinola, HMS Knight Templar and HMS Calgarian, sent boats ashore with rescue parties and medical personnel and soon began to take wounded aboard."

From 27 Nov 1918, Bill was transferred back to Plymouth Division, with a brief sojourn at HMS Excellent (shore establishment) near Portsmouth on 23 Dec 1918, but was Invalided on 25 Sep 1919. Whilst I don't know the nature, I can only surmise it may have been as a result of effects of the Halifax blast.

Remarks on his marine's record say, "Has a good knowledge of semaphore ..."

In 1939, William H Middleton, Road Chargeman for Devon County Council, and wife Alice Maud were living at Trickey Cottage, Ash Thomas, Devon. Lodging with them was Frederick H Kerslake (20) Railway Clerk. He was their nephew, son of Maud's sister Emily and her husband, Frederick James Kerslake.

Bill and Maud didn't have any children, for what reason I'm unaware, but they did have a cat named "Stripy" (a tabby, obviously), who, I was told, used to drink milk out of a jug on the windowsill, by dipping his paw in the jug (like Arthur from the Kattomeat ad). In our family, if you cleaned your plate at the end of a meal, someone would exclaim, "Poor old Stripy!", intimating that the poor cat, fed on scraps, would therefore go without. I only hope this was in jest!

Bill Middleton died in 1967, aged 78. Alice Maud Middleton of Tidcombe Hall, Tiverton, died on 21 Sep 1982, only a few weeks short of her 94th birthday. 

Tiverton : Tidcombe Hall
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/6337380
Early 19th century house, shown as Tidcombe Rectory on late 19th century Ordnance Survey map. Much altered in late 20th century. The building was also once a Marie Curie daycare unit.

Friday, 30 July 2021

George Burt and Fanny Jerwood

Tiverton : St Peter's Church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/1654824

George Burt married Fanny Jerwood on 25 Dec 1884 at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. George Burt's Rank or Profession was given as Sailor. Fanny Jerwood was the daughter of John Jerwood (b. 1830), Labourer and his wife Sarah Davey (who had also married at St Peter's on 31 May 1853). George Burt's father is listed on the marriage certificate as William Burt, Labourer, however, this looks like an error as records suggest George's father was Edward Burt. As his father had died when George was two, he would never have known him.

On 26 Nov 1837, Edward Burt (b. 1816), son of Richard Burt, had married Mary Ann Prescott (b. 1821), daughter of John Prescott and Ann Warren, also at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. In 1841 they were living in Bampton Street, Tiverton with son George Burt (b. 1840). By 1851, Edward Burt (34) Labourer and Mary Ann (30), had added Edward (b. 1842), John (b. 1846), Richard (b. 1848) and William (b. 1851). Living with them was Mary Carter (71) Lodger. 

In 1859, the son George born in 1840, died, aged 19.

George Burt, born 1863, was actually registered as Sidney George Burt.

Their father, Edward Burt, then died, in 1866, in Tiverton, aged 50. 

In 1870, listed simply as George Burt (Sidney is never used again), son of a widow from Bampton Street, he was registered at Heathcote School.

In 1871, Mary Ann Burt (50) Widow, Seamstress, was still living in Bampton Street with her children: John (25) Mason's Labourer, Lucy (19) Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory, Charlotte (17) Laundress, James (11) and George (7), both at School. Emily Peters (19) also Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory and her son Berty Peters (2) were Lodging with them. Mary Ann Burt died in 1877, aged 56.

And so, George Burt, born 4 Nov 1863, enlisted in the Royal Navy, at 15, as a Boy 2nd Class on 8 Apr 1879. He served until 1 Nov 1901 and joined the Royal Fleet Reserve on 18 Aug 1902. He was brought back into service on 2 Aug 1914 until 18 Jul 1917, although at shore establishments HMS Vivid (II and III). 

HMS Superb (1875)

In 1881, George Burt (17) Boy 1st Class was with the 1st Class Iron Screw Ship HMS Superb (1875), moored in Valletta (Grand Harbour), Malta.

George and Fanny's only child, Charles Edward Burt, was born on 4 Dec 1887.

In 1891, Fanny Burt (27) with son Charlie (3), were living at 150 Pembroke Street, Devonport, while George was with HMS Amphion (1883) in the Pacific.

Young Charlie was then enrolled at Heathcote School in 1894 and at that time, his mother's address was Melbourne Street, Tiverton, even though George was predominantly in Devonport in 1894, first with HMS Himalaya (1854) and then at HMS Vivid II, joining HMS Grafton (1892) on 23 Oct 1894.

In 1901, George Burt (38), now a Leading Stoker, was again at HMS Vivid II, before being pensioned on 1 Nov that year. Fanny (37) was living at 2, Wellbrook Street, Prospect Place, Tiverton, with Charles (13) now a Silk lace maker and Sarah Jerwood (70) Widow, Boarder (Fanny's mother.)

Sarah Jerwood having died in 1910, in 1911, George Burt (48) Grocer and dealer, wife Fanny (47) Assisting in the business and son Charles Edward Burt (23) Lace machine hand, were living at 24 Wellbrook St, Tiverton.

George Burt died in Tiverton in 1937, aged 73.

Fanny Burt died in 1938, aged 74.

Tiverton: Wellbrook Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/1993212

Thursday, 29 July 2021

Herbert William Proudlock and Dorothy May Shilcock

Paddington Station
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Malc McDonald - geograph.org.uk/p/5120568

Herbert William Proudlock and Dorothy May Shilcock married, in Portsmouth, in 1922. Herbert William Proudlock's birth was registered in Paddington, London, in 1896. There's no mother's maiden name on the registration, so we must assume that his was an illegitimate birth. But, similarly, it hasn't been possible, without the certificate, to even identify his mother. There's no obvious Miss Proudlock born or living locally, so from what I can find out about him, he may well have been found on said station and have a penchant for marmalade.

In 1911, H W Proudlock (14) from Paddington, London, turns up in the household of a F W Rackley (38) General Labourer, at Westborough Road, Maidenhead, Bisham Bray, Berkshire, described as a Foster Son, but employed as a Page Boy. Not surprising then that he goes to sea. 

Herbert William Proudlock (b. 30 Apr 1896) enlisted in the Royal Navy, aged 15, on 9 Feb 1912. On his naval record, his previous occupation, "House Boy" was later crossed out and expressed as Domestic Servant. On 30 Apr 1914, his 18th birthday, he signed up for a further 12 years and spent the First World War doing short tours on a wide variety of ships. On 29 Apr 1936, Herbert was Pensioned. Then on 1 Apr 1938 - no kidding - he was brought back into service again, served through World War II, being finally released on 17 Sep 1945.

Dorothy May Shilcock, meanwhile, was the daughter of Alfred Eli Shilcock and Florence Ada Poat, who married at St Mary's Church, Portsea, on 6 Nov 1902. Dorothy May Shilcock, born 2 Oct 1901, was baptised on 27 Sep 1908 at St Bartholomew's Church, Southsea (no longer standing?), along with her sister Rosa Louisa and brother Alfred Eli, who had been born on 10 Aug 1908. In 1911, the family, living at 3 Addison Road Southsea, Portsmouth, consisted Alfred Shilcock (38) Engine Fitter, Florence (31), Dorothy (9), Rosa (7), Doris (5), Alfred (2) and Ernest (0). (Although they listed the boys first.)

Herbert and Dorothy had three sons:
  1. Frederick William Eli Proudlock b. 5 Nov 1923
  2. Stanley Victor Proudlock b. 25 Dec 1928
  3. (Further son born 1934 may be still living)
In 1939, Dorothy M Proudlock was living at 75 Lovett Road, Portsmouth with her three sons, while her husband was at sea. Frederick had become a Shop Assistant at a Pawnbroker. (Frederick died, in Portsmouth, in 1997).

Herbert William Proudlock of 34 St. Chad's Avenue, North End, Portsmouth, died on 19 Feb 1970. Dorothy May Proudlock died on 20 Jul 1974.

Monday, 26 July 2021

Anthony Charles Mullarkey and Mabel Sarah E Manley

Central Terrace
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger W Haworth - geograph.org.uk/p/333311
Central Terrace: built as Police Quarters for those guarding the depot at Chattenden

Anthony Charles Mullarkey, second son of Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, married Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Manley (b. 16 Jan 1904), the daughter of William Manley and Jessie Hammacott, in Devonport, in 1926. 

They had one child, Barbara May Mullarkey, born in 1929, in Devonport.

HMS Centurion closeup 1918 | HMS Centurion Crew List

Anthony Charles Mullarkey had joined the Royal Marines as a Bugler at around 14½ on 18 Sep 1907, becoming a Private when he turned 18 in 1911. On 22 May 1913, he was assigned to HMS Centurion (1911), with which he stayed until 10 May 1919, which means, that on 31 May - 1 Jun 1916, Anthony also took part in the Battle of Jutland, as had his elder brother, John Martin Mullarkey. (And his future father-in-law, William Manley.)

Anthony left the Royal Marines on 11 Jan 1932. However, in 1939, Anthony Charles Mullarkey, Royal Marine Police and wife - listed as Mabel on census returns and the 1939 Register, but on Anthony's Royal Marines' record as Sarah, so was presumably known by her second name in the family - were living at No 3 Central Terrace, Chattenden, Upper Upnor, Kent. Central Terrace was built as Police Quarters for those guarding the depot at Chattenden.

Barbara May Mullarkey (1929-2008) married Ronald Stephen Lyons (1927-2014), in Chatham, in 1947. They had three children between 1947 and 1952. 

Anthony Charles Mullarkey, his service record shows, was discharged dead from the Royal Marines Police on 23 Jan 1968. He will have been 75, so I assume he was still engaged as something like a watchman. His Royal Marines and Royal Marines Police service put together add up to a total of 61 years. This surely has to be some sort of record? He is buried at Hoo St Werburgh.

Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Mullarkey of The Elms, 77 Main Road, Hoo, Kent (Residential Home), died on 27 Nov 1990, aged 86. 

The Parish Church of St Werburgh, Hoo
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Ifor R Griffiths - geograph.org.uk/p/267759

Friday, 23 July 2021

William Manley and Jessie Hammacott

Mary Street, Bovey Tracey
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Smith - geograph.org.uk/p/6543679

William Manley married Jessie Hammacott, in Devonport in the 3rd quarter of 1900. William Manley (b. 29 Nov 1869) in Bovey Tracey, Devon, lived in Mary Street, Bovey Tracey with his parents, Joseph Manley and Elizabeth Taylor Williams. Jessie Hammacott (b. 1872) meanwhile, was the daughter of John Hammacott and Sarah Trebble, and hailed from Chudleigh.

In 1891, William (21) was employed as a Blacksmith. William Manley joined the Royal Navy on 22 Aug 1891 and he and Jessie married just before William joined HMS Phaeton on which he served from Oct 1900 to 28 Apr 1903:

Phaeton was re-commissioned at Esquimalt (Canada) on 10 October 1900 by Captain Ernest James Fleet, to serve on the Pacific Station. In July 1902 she visited Acapulco, and most of the Autumn of that year she was at Panama. She paid off on 28 April 1903. This commission was the subject of a book in the 'Log' series, entitled: HMS Phaeton, Pacific Station, 1900–1903.
William and Jessie had six children:
  1. William Henry Manley b. 13 Sep 1897. William Henry Manley married Rose Evelyn Georgina Ide (b. 2 Jan 1897) at St Mark's church, Ford, Plymouth, on 20 Apr 1922. In 1939, William and Rose were living at 4 Stirling Rd, St Budeaux, Plymouth. William Henry Manley died in 1990, at 93. Rose Evelyn Georgina Manley died on 19 Oct 1993, at 96.
  2. Lilian May Manley b. 2 Mar 1899
  3. Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Manley b. 16 Jan 1904
  4. Sidney Manley b. 1910 (nothing after 1911 Census)
  5. Ronald Manley b. 23 Apr 1912. Ronald Manley married Lilian Annie Richards at The Anglican Church of Saint Boniface on 5 Oct 1935. In 1939, Ronald Manley, Fitter's Labourer Dockyard and wife Lilian were living at 16 Warleigh Avenue, Plymouth, along with Lilian's sister, Vera, Shorthand Typist RN Barracks. I can only assume that they must have divorced, as Lilian A Manley married Henry R Adams in 1946. Ronald Manley died in 1973. Lilian Annie Adams died on 13 Sep 2012, at the age of 97.
  6. Dorothy Manley b. 1914 (died 1916, aged 1)
In 1901, Jessie Manley (28) Wife of an armourer was living with their two oldest children at 28, Victory Street, East Devonport

On the 1911 Census, William Manley (41) has his occupation described as Chief armourer Royal Navy and is living with wife, Jessie (38) and children, William Henry (13), Lilian May (12), Mabel Sarah (7), Sidney (0) and William's widowed mother, Elizabeth Manley (72), at 67 Renown Street, East Devonport.

HMS Conqueror in 1912

On 28 Nov 1912, William Manley was assigned to HMS Conqueror and stayed with her through to 6 Mar 1919, which means that on 31 May - 1 Jun 1916, William Manley took part in the Battle of Jutland.

William Manley retired from the Royal Navy on 17 Jun 1922.

Jessie Manley died in the 2nd quarter of 1926, aged 54.

William Manley died in 1947, aged 77.

Wednesday, 21 July 2021

John Martin Mullarkey and Elsie Aitchinson

Church of St Jude, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/5813993

John Martin Mullarkey, son of Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, married Elsie Aitchinson (b. 7 Feb 1890), daughter of John George Aitchinson and Emma Bolt, at St Jude's Church, Plymouth on 9 Jul 1918.

Elsie's parents had married, on 29 Jun 1885, at Charles Church, Plymouth. John George Aitchinson of 16 Guldford Street, Plymouth was a Shipwright, son of John George Aitchinson, Petty Officer RN. Emma Bolt was from a few doors down at 10 Guildford Street and her father, John Bolt, was a Shoemaker.

Elsie was baptised, as an adult, on 19 Nov 1905, at Charles Church, Plymouth.

In 1911, the family was living at 59 Knighton Road, Plymouth, with John George Aitchinson (50) employed as a Shipwright at H M Dockyard, wife Emma (52) and both Elsie (21) and her younger sister Lilian (17) described as Tailorists.

John Martin Mullarkey (20) had enlisted in the Royal Navy on 19 Jun 1909 and in 1911, was bobbing about in Malta Harbour on HMS Medea

HMS Tiger in 1917

On 31 May - 1 Jun 1916 John Martin Mullarkey was serving as a Leading Stoker on HMS Tiger at the Battle of Jutlandthe largest naval battle of the First World War. Tiger was hit a total of 18 times during the battle, suffering 24 men killed and 46 wounded. John Martin Mullarkey stayed with Tiger until 30 Sep 1921.

Spoiler alert: John is the first of three family members (that I know of), all from the same street, to have been at the Battle of Jutland. All three survived.

After leaving the Royal Navy on 1 Apr 1928, John Martin became a Merchant Seaman. John's naval record says that he had a scar on his left thigh (inside) and a heart tattoo on his right forearm. His Merchant Navy record states that the top of his left index finger was crushed. It doesn't say when, where or how. 

John and Elsie Mullarkey had three children:
  1. John George Anthony Mullarkey b. 1 Oct 1920. John George Anthony Mullarkey married Lilian K Clarke in 1958. Born Lilian Kathleen May Hood on 18 Apr 1914, Lilian was probably a widow at the time of this marriage. She had previously married Herbert J Clarke in 1933 and potentially brought with her four children from this marriage. John George Anthony Mullarkey of 15 Dundas Street, Stoke, Plymouth, died on 8 Nov 1974. Lilian Kathleen May Mullarkey died on 25 Jun 1991.
  2. Lilian Kathleen Mullarkey b. 15 Oct 1922. In 1945, Lilian Kathleen Mullarkey married William George Matthews. They appear to have had one child later that year. Lilian Kathleen Matthews died in 1996.
  3. Martyn Mullarkey b. 15 Aug 1930. In 1951, Martyn Mullarkey married Margaret A Pepper and they appear to have one child in 1952. Martyn Mullarkey died, in Plymouth, in 2005.
In 1939, living at 54 Ocean Street, Plymouth, John M Mullarkey's occupation is described as "Greaser Cable Ship Maker Louisa Mackay" (Louisa Mackay was the name of his ship). Son John G A was a Turner And Fitter Apprentice; Lilian K a Shop Assistant and Martyn was at school. Living with them was John G Aitchinson, Retired Shipwright, Widowed (who died in 1941). 

Elsie Mullarkey died in Plymouth, in 1963, aged 73.

John Martin Mullarkey died the following year in 1974.

Monday, 19 July 2021

Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey

St Paul Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

Frederick Thomas Stone, of 9 St Paul's Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, second son of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, married Kathleen Mullarkey, tailoress, of 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, only daughter of Anthony Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, at the King Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, on 4 Aug 1923. Witnesses to the marriage were the bridegroom's first cousin, Charley Stone (undoubtedly best man); Rosina Kathleen Stone, the bridegroom's younger sister (bridesmaid perhaps), and Anthony Charles Mullarkey, the bride's brother, who presumably gave her away. At the time of his marriage, Frederick Thomas Stone gave his rank as Leading Signalman, H.M.S. Sandhurst. Both the bridegroom's father, Tom Stone, and the bride's father, Anthony Mullarkey (both deceased), had been Royal Marines, as were Charley Stone and Anthony Charles Mullarkey. That saved 'em on lounge suits! 

Frederick and Kathleen had two sons: 

  1. Frederick Anthony Stone born 25 July 1924
  2. Douglas John Stone born 27 Sep 1927
Frederick Thomas Stone had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a boy of 15, on 6 Jul 1907 and served until 31 March 1924. He then re-entered on 30 May 1932 as a Signalman. As he was still living in Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages in 1957, I think it safe to deduce that he served through both World Wars.

His naval record lists among his tattoos: an anchor on his right forearm; two female figures and a bird on his right forearm; Eagle, snake, Ensign, rose and thistle. Clasped hands and heart and 8 dots on left forearm. 

Royal Hospital School Bell Tower
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Jones - geograph.org.uk/p/2513717

In 1939, Frederick A Stone was a boarder at the Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy"). I've been unable to locate Frederick Thomas, Kathleen or son Douglas in 1939.

On 11 Aug 1943, Douglas J Stone appears on a "List or Manifest of Aliens Employed on the Vessel as Members of the Crew" of the Marquesa, as an apprentice on his 1st trip to New York. He was 16, 5' 4" and 123lbs.

Part of the old Buckland Hospital, Coombe Valley Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Baker - geograph.org.uk/p/5105714

Frederick Thomas Stone of 5 Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages, Old Folkstone Road, Dover, died on 11 Nov 1957, aged 65, at Buckland Hospital, Dover, leaving effects of £960 12s 5d to Frederick Anthony Stone, Chief Electrician R.N. and Douglas John Stone, Laboratory Assistant. As she isn't a beneficiary, Kathleen had presumably pre-deceased her husband, but I've [so far] been unable to identify the relevant record of her death.

Douglas John Stone died in 1985 in Kingsbridge, Devon. He will have been 58.

Frederick Anthony Stone died, also in 1985, on 19 Mar, in Newport, Wales. He will have been 60. There is a record of a marriage of a Frederick A Stone in Newport, in 1950, which might explain his presence there. 

Saturday, 17 July 2021

Walter James Baker and Laura Alice Stone

Combe Florey: village street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/56115

Laura Alice StoneFrederick James Stone and Loveday Jane Land's eighth child, married Walter James Baker, in Tiverton, in 1923 and went to live in Combe Florey, Somerset, where Walter had been born and brought up.

Walter James Baker (b. 27 Feb 1898) was son of Andrew Baker (b. 1865) and Elizabeth Annie Coles (m. 1892 in Combe Florey). In 1901, Andrew Baker (36), Stockman on Farm, wife Elizabeth A (35), son George A (8), Mary L (6) and Walter J (3) lived at Yard Wood Cottage, Village Street, Combe Florey. 

By 1911, Walter James Baker (13), still living at home in Combe Florey, was a "Labourer in garden domestic". Then on 1 Nov 1915, aged 17, Walter enlisted in the Royal Marines and served until 6 Jan 1920. He joined the Royal Fleet Reserve on 8 Jan 1920, from which he was discharged on 7 Jan 1925.

Walter and Laura had two children: 
  1. Irene Venetta Baker (later Phelps) born 1 Jan 1925
  2. Dennis Christopher Baker born 21 Dec 1925
In 1939, still living in Combe Florey, with wife Laura A and children Irene V and Dennis C, Walter was employed as a Civilian "Orderly At Military Camp".

Walter J Baker died in Taunton district, in 1965, aged 67.

Laura Alice Baker died five years later in 1970.

Wednesday, 7 July 2021

William George Beamer and Elsie May Carver

HMS Impregnable in the Hamoaze off Devonport Dockyard

William George Beamer, second son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, at age 16, in 1901, was a member of the crew of HMS Impregnable the 1st Rate (Training Ship For Boys), in the HamoazeDevonport off MakerSt Germans, Cornwall. After spending nineteen years in the reserve fleet at Devonport, HMS Impregnable became the Royal Navy's second boys' training ship at Devonport in 1862. (Regular readers might remember that my great-grandfather, David Jones, had served on the Navy's first boys' training ship, HMS Implacable).

Having signed up for a further 12 years in the Royal Navy, on 4 Feb 1903, William was discharged, invalided, on 8 Jun 1905. Then on 9 Sep 1905, he enlisted in the British Army in the Devonshire Regiment. One wonders what condition was classed as invalid for the Navy, but still fit for the Army.

Triq il-Fortizza - L-Inhawi ta' Pembroke Frank Vincentz, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, next we find William George Beamer (26), in 1911, with the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, stationed at Saint Georges Barracks, Malta. (Part of the Pembroke Army Garrison, at Pembroke, Malta, not far from St. Julian's.) (And this is the second relative I've found stationed in Malta in 1911.)

William George Beamer married Elsie May Carver at the Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity, which was located in Southside Street/Friars Lane, Barbican, Plymouth, on 17 May 1916. This church no longer exists because it was was destroyed in the Second World War and never rebuilt or replaced. 

Elsie May Carver, born on 22 Nov 1894, had been baptised on 16 Dec 1894 at Holy Trinity Church and, was the daughter of Charles Frederick Carver from Clerkenwell, London and Frances Rundle, native of Plymouth. (She was Frances Foster at the time of their marriage, so may have been a widow. If she's related to the Rundle clan in Cornwall - not a great stretch from Plymouth - then we've just gone round in yet another great big circle.) In 1911, the family, including Elsie May (16), had lived at Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street.

William George Beamer was the recipient of a Silver War Badge, having been discharged from the Machine Gun Corps on 30 Mar 1917, under King's Regulation 392 (xvi) “No longer physically fit for war service". The Silver War Badge was designed to be worn on civilian clothes after early discharge from the army. The accompanying certificate will have read, "Served with honour and was disabled in the Great War. Honourably discharged on ..."

Elsie's younger brother, Charles Frederick Carver (b. 1898), 5th (Prince of Wales's) Battalion (Territorials), Devonshire Regiment, son of Charles F. and Frances Carver, of 5, Artizan's Dwellings, Notte St., Plymouth, was killed in action on 20 Jul 1918 and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France. 

In 1939, William G Beamer, Skilled Labourer HM Dockyard, wife Elsie M Beamer and John F Carver (b. 1902), Road Repair Labourer (Elsie's brother), were still living at 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, Plymouth - buildings in that street were destroyed in the Second World War and demolished. 

William George Beamer, once more of 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, died on 1 Jan 1956 and left £605 4s 10d to his widow, Elsie May Beamer. 

Elsie May Beamer died in the 4th quarter of 1973, aged 79.

Tuesday, 6 July 2021

Edward Priddle and Ethel Annie Beamer

St Peter's Church, Wyndham Square, Plymouth
Plymouth's five star-rated building a select few people have been inside of
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Tom Jolliffe - geograph.org.uk/p/2342746

Ethel Annie Beamer, daughter of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Edward Priddle, Sergeant RMLI, son of James Priddle and Catherine Stevens, on 14 Oct 1905 at St Peter’s Church, Plymouth. Witnesses to their marriage were Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton, the bride's brother and his intended, who married exactly two months later in Tiverton, Devon.

Edward Priddle, born in Hackney, London on 12 Apr 1875, at 16, was employed by his father, who was a shoe maker, as a Clicker (A boot and shoe clicker is the person who cuts the uppers for boots or shoes), in Shoreditch. Edward subsequently enlisted in the Royal Marines on 27 Jan 1896 and served until 3 Mar 1918, finally attaining the rank of Lieutenant.

Edward and Ethel had three daughters, baptised at Plymouth, St Peter:
  1. Ethel Annie Priddle born 13 Jul 1906, bap. 29 Jul 1906 (died 1909, at 2)
  2. Winifred May Priddle born 4 May 1909, bap. 20 May 1909 
  3. Mary Caroline Priddle born 29 Dec 1912, bap. 2 Feb 1913
In 1911, Edward Priddle (35) Sergeant Royal Marines, Ethel Annie (28) and Winifred May (1), were living at 40 Neswick Street Plymouth.

In 1939, the family including Edward Priddle, Retired RM, Ethel A, and Ethel's widowed mother, Mary Ann Beamer were living at 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth. Winifred May Priddle was an Assistant Mistress at a Secondary School in Exeter and Mary C Hadley and her husband, John Harold Hadley (Retail Tobacconist Proprietor), were residing at 42 Chestnut Road, Plymouth.

Ethel Annie Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 12 May 1959, leaving £281 17s 9d to her husband, Edward Priddle, Retired Lieutenant RM. 

Edward Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 21 Jun 1962. He was 87. He left effects of £2809 11s to his two daughters, Winifred May Mayner (m. 1959) and Mary Caroline Tomkins (m. 1951). 

Tuesday, 29 June 2021

James Land and Rose Anna Beamer

Church of St Michael and All Angels, Bampton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Rob Purvis - geograph.org.uk/p/6807505

James Land, widower, married Rose Anna Beamer, widow, on 19 Apr 1863 at the Parish Church of St Michael and All Angels in Bampton, Devon. 

James Land (b. 1828) was the son of John Land, Labourer, and in 1841, aged 13, was in his father's household at Gate Street, West, Bampton. His mother's given name was Loveday, born 1804 in Rackenford, Devon. I haven't been able to find a record of his parents' marriage, but the only relevant baptism that year in Rackenford, is for a Loveday Flew. If correct, this is the same Flew family of Rackenford that my 2x great-grandmother, Jane Middleton, married into. 

In 1851, James (23) was still at home, unmarried. But by 1861, James (32) was living as a Lodger in the household of Ann Beamer (38) from Norton, Somerset, along with four of her children: Mary (10), Alfred (8), James (6) and Lindy (2). 

The only one of those children for whom I can find a civil registration is James Beamer in 1855, which confirms that Rose Anna's maiden name was Smith. 

At the time of her marriage to James Land, Rose Anna Beamer had given her father's name as Isaac Smith, Labourer. I've found a record of a baptism on 1 Feb 1824 for a Mary Smith, daughter of Isaac and Hannah Smith at All Saints, Norton Fitzwarren, who may have been her sister.

James Land, therefore, must have been both married and widowed between the 1851 and 1861 censuses. There is a marriage of a James Land to a Jane Flew in 1854 and the death of a Jane Land, aged 30, in 1856, which, by process of elimination, looks like it might relate. They were probably cousins. 

Yes, the family tree of my Devon ancestors would be in the form of a circle. Or as 'him indoors' says, a very complicated monkey puzzle tree! LOL

Beamer is a surname found in Clayhanger right back to the 1600s and probably still. In 1851 there was a James Beamer (58), who's a likely in-law.

With a two year old in 1861, one might assume that Rose Anna (Ann) had only fairly recently been widowed, but the only record of a death that may potentially be that of her husband - I haven't [yet] been able to find a record of this earlier marriage, but son Alfred Beamer's marriage gives his father's name as James Beamer - is that for a James Beamer, aged 37, in the last quarter of 1854. That would make James Beamer, born 1855, a posthumous child. Although, it would make Lindy Beamer the child of another liaison. Not exactly unheard of. 

John and Rose Anna had at least three further children together: 
  1. George Land Beamer born Q4 1862 (died Q1 1863, aged 0)
  2. Loveday Jane Land born 1864, in Bampton, Devon
  3. John Land born 3 Feb 1866, in Stoodleigh, Devon
John Land, aged approximately 90, died in 1866. This age would fit with James' father and would explain why he named his son John in the same quarter.

In 1871, in High Street, Bampton, we find James Land (41) and Rosannah (46), with just Loveday J (7) and John (5). Not one of Rose Anna's previous family are living with their mother. It's not the first time I've seen a first family "disappear" when their parent remarries either. Rose Anna's daughter, Mary (b. 1850), I've been unable to find any further mention of; Alfred Bimmer (sic) (19) was working as a [Farm] Servant for Thomas Chave in Morebath; James Beamer (16) Masons Labourer was lodging, with Henry Beamer (21) Ag Lab, elsewhere in Bampton; there are no other records at all of Lindy Beamer (b. 1859).

In 1881, at Westbrook Cottage, Bampton, at a guess, on Westbrook Farm (PDF), were James Land (54) Ag Lab; Ann Land (58); Jane Land (18) Domestic (Out of Service) - just given birth; John Land (16) Gen Labourer; Henry Beames (sic) (8) Grandson and Rosana Land (0) Granddaughter. 

Loveday Jane Land married Frederick James Stone on 10 Oct 1881.

James Land died, aged 56, in the first quarter of 1884.

There is a death of a Rose Anne Land in 1889, with her age estimated as 40. This would be a 20 year discrepancy, if typical lie about a woman's age. 

Entrance, Fort Stamford
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/5626178

In 1891, John Land (24) was a Private in the Royal Marines Light Infantry at Fort StamfordPlymstock, Devon. He enlisted on 3 Jan 1885, served for 21 years until Jan 1906 and then again in 1914-15. That latter period, mostly, at Plymouth Division, but from 12 Sep - 3 Dec 1914, on HMS Jupiter
When World War I broke out in August 1914, Jupiter was transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet. During this service, she covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In late October 1914, Jupiter was reassigned to serve alongside her sister ship Majestic as a guard ship at the Nore. On 3 November 1914, Jupiter and Majestic left the Nore and relieved their sister ships Hannibal and Magnificent of guard ship duty on the Humber. In December 1914, Jupiter moved on to guard ship duty on the Tyne.
Interestingly, on his Marines Record, John describes his sister Loveday Jane's daughter, Rose Anna Southwood (née Land) as his sister, whereas she was his niece. This might suggest that the illegitimate child was brought up by her grandparents long enough for him to consider her as such.

In 1911, John Land (45) Horse Man on Farm had been boarding with his niece (who he considered a sister) Rose Anna (30) and her husband, William Henry Southwood (34) at Chieflowman Cottage, Uplowman.

John does not marry and I cannot be sure of when he died.

Tuesday, 12 January 2021

The Great Spy Peril: Enemy Aliens in Great Britain

The Catholic parish church of St. Johann in Donaueschingen, Germany. The building with a double tower facade in the Bohemian Baroque style was built from 1724 to 1747 to a design by the Prague architect František Maxmilián Kaňka. Photo H. Helmlechner, CC BY-SA 4.0.

Sarah Sophia Tompson - eldest daughter of my 2x great-grandfather, Dan Tompson and his second wife, Sarah Jane Baker, and therefore half-sister to my great-grandmother, Eliza Louisa Sweeney - married Joseph Kritzer in 1905. He was born in Donaueschingen, Germany and was one of a family of brothers and a sister who came to England to work in service in some very distinguished households. At least three of the siblings were in England at the outbreak of the First World War and found themselves at the epicentre of the anti-German hysteria and Spy Fever, incited by the press of the time

The parallels with the present day are many.

Source of the Donaubach in Donaueschingen (historically considered the source of the Danube)
Donaueschingen, in the Schwarzwald (Black Forest) near the confluence of the two sources of the river Danube, close to the borders with Switzerland and France, is postcard perfectThis video gives us a look around the town today and the pronunciation of Doe-now-ess-shingen. 
The German surname Kritzer, it is said, is derived from the Old German word "Kretscham," meaning "inn." The name was most likely first borne by an innkeeper. [We wouldn't have any of those in the family. LOL!] Although, there is an alternative suggestion that it's South German: probably an occupational name for a coiner, from krüzer Kreutzer. 
The earliest members of the family I can trace records for are Sebastian Kritzer and Rosina Drescher, who married on 4 Jul 1803. Their son, Michael Kritzer, married Agatha Hall on 26 Apr 1841. And in turn, Michael and Agatha's son, Wilhelm Kritzer (b. 10 Jan 1844) married Flora Gleichauf (b. 26 Jan 1851) on 26 Jun 1873. All of these marriages took place at the Katholisch (The Catholic parish church of St. Johann, consecrated to John the Baptist) in Donaueschingen, Villingen, Baden. Wilhelm and Flora Kritzer then went on to have five children, all baptised inside that same church:
  1. Amalia Kritzer, born 7 Oct 1873, baptised 19 Oct 1873
  2. Julius Kritzer, born 18 Aug 1874, baptised 23 Aug 1874. 
  3. Karl Kritzer, born 3 Nov 1875, baptised 14 Nov 1875
  4. Josef Kritzer, born 30 Oct 1877 and baptised 11 Nov 1877 
  5. Wilhelm Kritzer, born 10 Mar 1879, baptised 23 Mar 1879,
    but who sadly died on 14 Sep of the same year.
Pelham Place, Kensington.
Photo: Jonathan Cardy, CC BY-SA 3.0,
via Wikimedia Commons
Amalia Kritzer (27) in 1901, was employed as a Lady's Maid in the household of spinster sisters, Mary and Adela Rain at 20, Alexander Square, Kensington, a garden square in London's Chelsea, SW3. (The sort of posh private communal gardens that featured in the film Notting Hill.) In 1911, she's again working as Lady's Maid for a 3rd sister, Elizabeth Rain at 19 Pelham Place, Kensington. (The two older Rain sisters were born in France and the latter in Ireland, so the family don't appear on any census in England until we find them, living with their father, Stephen Rain, in the similarly upmarket Egerton Gardens, in 1891, where he was 'Living on own Means', but - I'm just curious - haven't discovered from what source that wealth emanated.) Amalie Kritzer, spinster, of 125 Beaufort St, Chelsea, London died, aged 60, on 4 Oct 1934. She left £1267 5s 8d (worth £91,275 in 2020). Probate was granted to Mortimer Rooke and Alexander Herbert Macdonald, solicitors.

Postcard of Karlstraße, Donaueschingen
Julius Kritzer of 26 Karlstrasse, Donaueschingen, Germany died on 12 Feb 1925. (Karlstraße, appears to be the main street. Could he have been in retail or even an innkeeper?) Probate was granted, however, in 1929, in England, to Mortimer Rooke, solicitor, attorney of Justina Kritzer, widow. It seems strange to have probate granted in England, unless they also spent time in the UK, but I can find no record of either of them having done so and no other record of Julius, nor Justina. Julius left a more modest £468 17s 2d (£28,639 in 2020).

Cathedral Road, Cardiff
Karl Kritzer (25) in 1901, was butler to John P Ingledew, Solicitor, residing at 9 Cathederal Road, St John, Cardiff. There, in 1905, an Anglicized, Charles Kritzer married Lilian Emily Jones, daughter of Samuel Jones, a Foreman at a Timber Merchant, and his wife Fanny Theresa. Flora Theresa Lillian Kritzer was born at the end of 1905 and, in 1911, this child was living with her grandparents in Gloucester, while her father, residing at 2 Seymour Street, St Marylebone, London, was employed as butler to Henry Webb (Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Henry Webb, 1st Baronet), Liberal MP for the Forest of Dean, while her mother, employed as a Lady's Maid to Lady Webb, was at the Webb's country house at Llwynarthan, Castleton, Monmouthshire.

When I saw who Karl was working for in the run up to WWI, I knew there was going to be a story. By accident of his birth and the position of his employer, Karl found himself under scrutiny. Hardly surprising, but quite shocking. 

For context, it's important also to understand that Sunday newspaper, John Bull, was at that time a platform for Horatio Bottomley's "trenchant populist views" (read gammon: clearly reactionary and given to melodrama by the style of his writing), but it had estimated sales by August 1914 in excess of three quarters of a million copies a week. Bottomley was described as an English financier, journalist, editor, newspaper proprietor, swindler, and Member of Parliament. (When exposed, he was convicted, imprisoned and expelled from parliament.) Evidently, he judged others based on his own standards. 

Secondly, as to the actual level of threat from Espionage in 1914, it was shown to be predominantly paranoia and put down to Journalistic fantasy, as "An unprecedented 'spy mania' gripped Britain. Although 21 real German spies were arrested on 4 August, thousands of imaginary acts of espionage were reported to credulous police and military authorities." 

In an article published in John Bull on October 24th, 1914, Bottomley starts off by referring to German people as "Teutons", a word that has been used - and this is phrased - as a derogatory term. Mentioning Karl Kritzer by name, Bottomley tries to make something out of the observations - of him merely going about his duties - and imaginings of a cook, the so-called Mrs Stacey (having researched, I find she is single and strongly suspect that 'elevating' her status to that of a married woman was an attempt to make her seem a more reliable witness), who opines that "Kritzer was always an objectionable person." (Probably nowhere near as objectionable to someone less bigoted.) Bottomley calls her "loyal and patriotic", while referring to Karl Kritzer as "a traitor to her King and country" and "one of the Kaiser's blood". He offers no evidence for these accusations. It's not every day one's relatives are mentioned in the same breath as then Prime Minister, Herbert Henry Asquith; Home Secretary, Reginald McKennaPrince Louis of BattenbergWilhelm II, German Emperor and the House of Hohenzollern, though for all the wrong reasons. 


They have no evidence, of course, but also attempt to make an issue of Karl returning to Germany shortly before the war. The records show that Karl's father was born in 1844, which would make him 70 in 1914. An entirely plausible age then for the man to be ill or dying. It's a particularly low blow.

Another article in The Strathearn Herald, published on the very same date, October 24, 1914 - which frankly reads like Bottomley wrote it himself - praises the John Bull and Bottomley for doing "a national service in calling attention to the spy peril in our midst" and goes further, saying "Karl Kritzer, in the employment of Mr Webb, a member of His Majesty's Government, may not be a spy; neither may the humblest German barber: but there is just this - they are both alien enemies, and as such a danger to the country ..."

We learn quite a bit about Karl Kritzer from a follow-up article in the Western Mail, on Friday October 30, 1914, where Harry Webb, MP, is given the opportunity of responding. Apparently, Karl had been in his employ since 1908 and it confirms many of the details that I have also been able to research, such as Karl's naturalisation, Certificate A21115 issued 18 October 1911, which was signed by then Home Secretary, W. S. Churchill (I have a copy). Webb's manner of defending Karl Kritizer, does indeed seem to be the behaviour that a "decent, honourable man ought to pursue towards his servant."

Despite all this, we know Karl kept his job long after the end of the hostilities, because the following appeared in the Western Mail of 8 January 1921:
LLWYNARTHAN STAFF DANCE
After a lapse of six years, occasioned by the war, the annual staff dance at Llwynarthan, Castleton, Cardiff, the residence of Col. Sir Henry and Lady Webb, was revived on Thursday evening. The ball-room and smoke-rooms, originally a part of the old farmhouse, were converted into hospital wards during the war, and since being vacated by the patients, several alterations have been carried out. A happy party, numbering between 60 and 70, were entertained. Sir Henry and Lady Webb, and the members of the house party, did everything in their power to ensure the success of the function. Supper was laid in the dining-room, and after mutual expressions of esteem and goodwill, Sir Henry and Lady Webb left the staff and their friends at about midnight to their own devices. Thanks to the very admirable arrangements made by Mrs. Wynn and Mr. Charles Kritzer, a thoroughly happy and enjoyable time was spent.

Now who's the loyal servant, eh?  

Flora T L Kritzer married a William B Connors, in Cardiff, in 1929. It appears they had one child, in 1939. Karl Kritzer had died in 1933, in Faversham, Kent, aged 57 and on 6 Feb 1935, Lillian Emily Kritzer departed Southampton for New York, aboard the RMS Berengaria (formerly SS Imperator) The first Cunard "Queen". The trip appears just to have been a holiday / visit. Lillian, then employed as a barmaid, was living at 20 Effingham Street, Belgravia in 1939. Retired, Lilian Emily Kritzer of 2 Cross Roads, Holywell, Wales, died, aged 75, and was buried on 13 Mar 1962 in Bagillt, Flintshire, Wales.

Joseph Kritzer married Sarah Sophia Tompson on 24 May 1905 in Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire. Their daughter, Mary Amalie Kritzer was born on 21 Feb 1906, but she may not have been the couple's first child. On the census return for the household of Sarah's parents, Dan and Sarah Jane Tompson, in 1911, in Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire there appears a 'mystery' grandchild listed as William Charles Roizen (7), who it says, was born in 1904 'At Sea'.

On 18 Oct 1912, listed as Willie Thompson (8), he sailed to Montreal from Liverpool aboard the SS Corsican with his grandmother, Sarah Jane, and his aunt Ivy. On the 1921 Census of Canada, Willie Christie (18) is living at 131 Morrison Avenue, Toronto with his grandparents. This is clearly the same grandchild who had been listed as Roizen in 1911 and Thompson in 1912. There is a note of correction on the 1921 entry suggesting he should be Critzer. I've found no further record for him [yet] under any name. 

However, as I don't know who made the note on the 1921 record, what they know and from what source (it could be merely 'family tradition'), there also exists the possibility that this child was a product of a previous relationship that Sarah Sophia had (presumably with someone named Roizen), which might explain why the grandparents raised the child and not Kritzer.

St Wilfrid's, Chelsea

In 1911, Joseph Kritzer (33), was employed as a butler in the household of architect, Henry Louis Florence at 9 Prince's Gate, Knightsbridge, London. At the same time, daughter, Mary Amalia Kritzer (5) is listed as an 'Inmate' at St Wilfrid's Convent School in Cale Street, Chelsea. However, I cannot [yet] find her mother in 1911, under any name combination, anywhere in the world.

Interestingly, when Joseph is working for Henry Florence, there's also a Rosina Christie employed as a housemaid. Given that servants would most likely be referred to by their surnames, I wonder if Kritzer was misheard as Christie (or vice-versa), which led to its adoption an Anglicized version.

St Martin-in-the-Fields.
Photo Robert Cutts, CC BY 2.0,
via Wikimedia Commons
In the 3rd quarter of 1933, Mary A Kritzer or Christie (what the record says) married Edward W B Todd at St Martin, London

In 1939, Mary A Todd, a hairdresser, and her husband, Edward, were living at 2 Ashford Cottages, The Tilt, Cobham, Surrey. We can only hope there was a divorce in the interim, because Mary A Todd or Christie (again what the record says) then married Frederick Croydon Melhuish in Surrey North Eastern in 1942. Edward W B Todd died, aged 48, in 1949 in Surrey. While Frederick C Melhuish died, aged 53, also in 1949, in Birmingham (where he'd lived previously and undoubtedly still had family).

In 1939 'Daisy' S S Kritzer, Housekeeper, listed as married, was living at 1 Pemry Villas, Elm Grove Road, Cobham, Surrey. It looks like a house-share (lodging) situation as there are three other, seemingly unrelated, adults in the household and no sign of husband Joseph. Sarah Sophia Kritzer, then of 2 Ashford Cottages, Tilt Road, Cobham, Surrey, listed as wife of Joseph Kritzer, died, aged 68, on 20 Feb 1945. She left £595 13s (worth £25,849 in 2020) to her daughter, Mary Amelia Melhuish, married woman.

On 6 Jan 1992, Mary Amelia Melhuish (formerly Todd, née Kritzer and sometimes Christie), died, aged 85, in Ganges, British Columbia, Canada. The record of her death confirms her husband as Frederick Croydon Melhuish and her parents as Joseph Kritzer and Sarah Tompson. Two things spring to mind: clearly someone was around who knew and could give these details and what was she doing at what appears to be the 'wrong end' of Canada for family?

Other than those last couple of records in 1939 and 1945 relating to Sarah alluding to Joseph Kritzer still being alive - where she's described as married and as his wife - there's no further sign of him in Britain and no trace of a record even of his death. Unlike his brother Karl, Joseph does not become naturalised British. Sister, Amalia, will have escaped detention, being a woman. However, initial enquiries suggest that Joseph Kritzer (37) - which he would have been in 1914 - was interned that year at the Knockaloe Internment Camp Isle of Man during WWI. Did he perhaps return to Germany after the war? 

There are many questions that still need to be answered.