Showing posts with label Kent. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kent. Show all posts

Sunday, 9 May 2021

William Hill Adcock and Annie Dear

On Whitechapel Road, London
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Ian S - geograph.org.uk/p/6376642

William Hill Adcock, second son of James Adcock and Mary Hill, married Anne Dear (bap. 16 Jun 1844), daughter of Stephen and Catherine Dear, at Christ Church, Watney StreetSt George in the East in 1864.

William and Annie had thirteen children: 
  1. Annie Eliza Adcock born 1865 in St George in the East
  2. Mary Elizabeth Adcock born 1868 in Shoreditch
  3. Louisa Catherine Adcock born 1869 in Whitechapel
  4. William James Adcock born 1870 in Whitechapel (died 1872, aged 1)
  5. Flora Adcock born 1872 in Whitechapel
  6. Minnie Adcock born 1874 in Whitechapel
  7. Ada Alice Adcock born 1876 in Whitechapel
  8. Charles William Adcock born 1877 in Whitechapel (died 1878, aged 0)
  9. Albert Henry Adcock born 1878 in Whitechapel
  10. Walter Charles Adcock born 1880 in Whitechapel
  11. William Ernest Adcock born 1882 in Whitechapel (died 1883, aged 0)
  12. Emily Marie Adcock born 1884 in West Ham (died 1886, aged 2)
  13. Edwin John Adcock born 1891 in Darford
In 1871, living in Whitechapel, are William Adcock (30) Tobacconist Shopman, wife Annie Adcock (26) birthplace Winterslow, Wiltshire; Annie (5); Louisa (2) and William (0). No idea why Mary Elizabeth was not listed. 

In 1881, at 4 Whitechapel Road, Whitechapel, we find William Adcock (40), Manager to Tobacconist; Annie (36); Mary E (13), Louisa (11), Flora (8), Minnie (6), Ada (5), Albert (2) and Walter (0). 

In 1891, living in Victoria Street, Erith, Kent, William Adcock (50) is now employed as a Machinist. Living with him are wife Annie (46), Louisa (21), Albert (12), Walter (11) and Edwin (0).

And in 1901, still in Victoria Street, we find William Adcock (60) a Machine Minder in a Gun Works - presumably the Vickers Works, Erith - with wife Annie (56), Albert (22), Walter (20) and Edwin (10). 

Annie Adcock died, in Dartford, in 1902, aged 58.

In 1911, William Adcock (70) is an inmate at Dartford Union Workhouse.

William Adcock died in 1920, in Bromley, Kent, aged 79.

Dartford Union Workhouse
Ethan Doyle White, CC BY-SA 4.0

Thursday, 29 April 2021

Stephen Botterill and Elizabeth Tubb

Shakespeare Road, Gillingham
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Whippet - geograph.org.uk/p/3889536

Stephen Botterill (b. 1841), younger son of Stephen Botterill and Mary Thompson and brother of Daniel Botterill, married Elizabeth Tubb, daughter of Edward Tubb and Hannah Bussey, at Christ Church Watney StreetSt George in the East, in the 1st quarter of 1876. Elizabeth's father, Edward Tubb was a Shipwright from Portsmouth, Hampshire. Elizabeth was born in Portsmouth and baptised at St Mary's Church, Portsea on 29 Dec 1850. However, in 1861, the family were living in James StreetSheerness on the Isle of Sheppey.

In 1871, Stephen Botterill (30), a Police Constable, was in Gillingham, Kent.

Seven kids must have been a stretch of a bobby's salary:  
  1. Alice Bottrill born 1877
  2. Mary Elizabeth Botterill born 1881
  3. Stephen Botterill born 3 Sep 1883
  4. John Botterill born 20 May 1886
  5. Grace Hannah Botterill born 1888
  6. Florence Botterill born 1891
  7. Gertrude Botterill born 1894
In 1881, Stephen Botterill (39), Police Constable, wife Elizabeth (29), Alice (4) and Mary Elizabeth (0), are at 7 Unity Cottages, Gardiner Street, Gillingham

By 1891, in Shakespeare Road, Gillingham, Stephen (50), Police Constable, Elizabeth (40), Alice (14), Mary (10), Stephen (7), John (4) and Grace (2).

In 1901, Stephen Bottrill (58), now employed as an Excavator, Elizabeth (46), Mary (19), John (15), Grace (11), Florence (9) and Gertrude (7). Alice had married in 1899, while Stephen had joined the Royal Navy.

Stephen Bottrill died on 30 May 1904, aged 63, although probate wasn't granted - to his two sons, Stephen and John - until 30 June 1933. 

In 1911, Elizabeth (57), widow, working as a tailoress, has her three youngest daughters: Grace (22), Florence (20) and Gertrude (16), living with her.

Elizabeth Bottrill died in 1932. She will have been 82.

Daniel Thompson Botterill and Jessie Elizabeth Maslin

80 Queens Road, Peckham

Daniel Thompson Botterill, second son of Dan Stephen Thompson Botterill and Mary Jane Harris, married Jessie Elizabeth Maslin, daughter of James Maslin and Jessie Elizabeth Dunford, in the 3rd quarter of 1905, in Greenwich.

Daniel and Jessie then had two sons: 
  1. Joseph Daniel Botterill born 3rd quarter of 1907, died in the 1st quarter of 1908 and buried on 25 January 1908 at Charlton Cemetery (Greenwich)
  2. Daniel Thompson Botterill born in the 3rd quarter of 1908, in Greenwich
The second boy, like David Copperfield, was a posthumous child, because Daniel Thompson Botterill had died, aged 26, at 26 Inverine Road, Charlton and had been buried, on 18 January 1908, at Charlton Cemetery (Greenwich). 

Not unsurprisingly therefore, we find that Jessie Elizabeth Botterill remarried in 1910, to Welshman, Evelyn John Gutton Budge. Confirming that I'd found the correct spouse, Jessie Elizabeth Budge is living with her son, Daniel Tompson Batterell (sic) (2), in 1911 in Gillingham, Kent. Her new husband however, was boarding in the household of a Henry Webb in Chatham. That doesn't seem far enough away for him to be boarding for a work related necessity, so I suspect an estrangement, but I'm still looking for a record of a divorce or Jessie's death.

In 1912, Jessie Elizabeth Budge is listed on the Electoral Register at 80 Queens Road, Peckham (second floor), a mystery in itself as she would not have had the vote until at least 1918 and only then if she had enough wealth [unlikely].

Meanwhile, records show that Evelyn John Gutton Budge had arrived in Quebec, Canada in Jun 1911 and appears to have travelled alone. In 1913, he crossed the border into the United States, where he appears to do Military Service during WWI and, in 1917, married Mabel Dorothy Morris. They apply for Naturalization in 1918 and he died there in Los Angeles, California on 2 Sep 1969.

There are some indications that Daniel Thompson Botterill (b. 1908) may have gone to Canada at a later date, which I still need to investigate.

Tuesday, 27 April 2021

John Benjamin Botterill and Everlda Jane Caroline Summers - and three more pubs to crawl

St John the Evangelist, Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill - Sanctuary
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/2428606
View of St. John's Church from St. John's Gardens

John Benjamin Botterill (b. 1864), son of Daniel Botterill and Sarah Elizabeth Thompson, married Everlda Jane Caroline Summersdaughter of Thomas and Ann Summers (who in 1871 had lived in Testerton Street, Kensington), at St John the EvangelistLansdowne CrescentNotting Hill on 21 Oct 1889. 

In 1891, they are living at 115 High StreetLewisham, with John B (26), a Butcher, Everelda (25), their first child, Thomas Daniel (0) and Elsie Jones (43), Ladies Nurse, a widow from Catford, London, lodging with them.

John and Everlda go on to have four children: 

  1. Thomas Daniel born 1891
  2. Everlda Botterill born 20 Sep 1892
  3. Benjamin Tompson Botterill born 1895
  4. Mary Botterill born 1902
Princess Royal Public House
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Peter Trimming - geograph.org.uk/p/1215433

But in 1900 and again in 1901, they are at the Princess Royal at 22, Longley Road, Croydon, where his uncle, John Soppit, had employed John Benjamin Botterill (36) as his Licenced Victualler Manager. Living there also are his wife Everlda (35), son Thomas Daniel (10), Everlda (8), Benjamin Tompson (5) and John's father, Daniel (69), who is listed as a widower - which is a mystery, because his wife, Sarah, was alive and living in Lewisham at the time.

Then on 16 Oct 1902, John Benjamin Botterill (38), appeared at the Quarter Sessions in Maidstone, accused of stealing, by his uncle, John Soppit.

From the Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser 23 October 1902

THE JURY STOP A CASE

John Benjamin Botterill pleaded not guilty to stealing two boxes containing 51 cigars, one bottle of brandy, three bottles of whiskey, etc., belonging to John Soppitt, at Cudham, on August 7th.

Mr. C. S. Fooks prosecuted, and Mr. Hohler defended.

John Soppit, formerly licensee of the Princess Royal, Croydon, deposed that in 1898 he took the prisoner, who was his nephew, into his employ as manager and paid him at first £2 15s per week, and after £2. The net takings of the house were not satisfactory to him at the latter part of the prisoner's management. Prisoner left on June 23rd of this year. Then witness looked through the books. Prisoner had bought goods unauthorised, and after his departure witness found some scales missing. He afterwards found them in the prisoner's possession at the Blacksmiths' Arms, at Cudham, and he also found a couch there, which had been at the Princess Royal. Other things, including glasses, were also missing.

By Mr. Hohler: The couch was never given to the prisoner by him. He did not know that the bottle of brandy was given to the prisoner by the wholesale firm, and was not aware that the cigars were brought from the result of a draw from the slate club. The reason he saw the gas mantles were his was because they were the same kind as those used at the Princess Royal, and the glasses were similar to those belonging to witness. The labels with the prisoner's name on, which were on the bottles, was not printed with the witness's consent.

Sergt. Humphrey deposed to searching the Blacksmith's Arms, and finding the mantels in a box among some children's clothes.

Cross-examined: The prisoner had an excellent character. The goods had evidently not been unpacked after the move.

Prisoner gave evidence on oath, and said that his uncle gave him the couch. The cigars he bought as his share in the money out of the slate club, the money to be spent in the house. The bottle of whiskey and brandy was given to him by the wholesale houses in 1899. The bottle of gin was given to him by his uncle.

The jury at this point stopped the case, and the prisoner was discharged. 

The Blacksmith's Arms, Cudham
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Oast House Archive - geograph.org.uk/p/1984351

As we can see from the report above, John Benjamin Botterill, in 1902, had gone to the Blacksmith’s ArmsCudham (in the London Borough of Bromley), although not for long. (Read about this beautiful pub's history here.)

Prince Frederick, Bromley
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Whippet - geograph.org.uk/p/4625769

In 1911, we find John Benjamin Botterill (46), Licenced Victualler, at the Prince Frederick, Nichol Lane, Bromley, Kent, with wife, Everlda Jane Caroline Botterill (45), assisting in the business, Thomas Daniel (20), engineer's fitter, Everlda (18), dressmaker, Benjamin Thompson (15), Mary (8) and Esther Elizabeth Challen (19), Servant. They are still there in 1913.

We next catch up with the family, in 1939, living at 44 Wellington Avenue, Hounslow, Middlesex. Living with John Benjamin Botterill (75), described as a Retired Fitter's Mate, are wife Everlda J C (74), daughter Everlda White, dressmaker, widowed, and her daughter, Jean M White (16) and a Leslie F Taylor, Gentleman's hairdresser, presumably a lodger.

Everlda Jane Caroline Botterill died, aged 77, in 1943, in Brentford. John Benjamin Botterill died five years later, in 1984, aged 83, in Ealing.