Showing posts with label British Army. Show all posts
Showing posts with label British Army. Show all posts

Sunday, 29 August 2021

Cornelius Walter Jones


Cornelius Walter Jones, born 2 Jan 1893 in Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, eldest son of David Jones and his second wife, Laura Elizabeth White, was my grandmother's elder brother. We've never been able to find his military record, but know he enlisted in the Army and served during World War I. His first cousin's husband, who was in Queenstown with the US Navy, kept a detailed diary and had written that Cornelius (Con) was leaving for Egypt in 1917. 

The image above, which I will admit that I downloaded some years ago (and have since lost the link), is dated 10.11.1917 EGYPT. The taller man, second from right, back row, is so much like my father it's literally like looking straight into his eyes. His stance, eyes, ears, nose, mouth, brow line and, above all, hair, are all identical. It's eerie and uncanny and, unless someone can prove otherwise, I feel very sure that there's a chance this is my great-uncle, Cornelius Jones.

Though the cousin's daughter had thought that Con didn't return from the war, I know that he did, probably suffering shell-shock, for which one of his younger siblings described him as "daft" - such was the lack of understanding then. 

Not expecting to find him there in Ireland, we were quite shocked when we read the listing of his burial at the Old Church Cemetery (Cobh)

Cornelius Jones, late of Rushbrooke, Cork, died on 21 Apr 1926 at the Cork District Hospital (now St. Finbarr's Hospital, with its origins in the Cork Union Workhouse and Infirmary). He was a bachelor, previously employed as a labourer. The record says 30, but he was 33 and died from Pneumonic Phthisis (tuberculosis, also known as consumption), after 8 months in hospital. The informant was Helena Lynch, "Inmate" Cork Union. 

Cornelius Walter Jones was buried on 24 Apr 1926, in the family plot at Old Church Cemetery (Cobh), along with his mother, Laura Elizabeth Jones (née White), who had died in 1917.

Thursday, 26 August 2021

Charles Ridgeway and Ivy Edna Evans

Fort Regent, Saint Helier, Jersey

Charles Ridgeway (b. 1884), son of Thomas Ridgway and Ann Tooze, married Ivy Edna Evans (b. 5 Jan 1905), in Tiverton, in 1936. The bridegroom was 52 at the time of their marriage, while the bride was 21 years his junior at 31. Nevertheless, this does seem to be Charles' first marriage. Unable to find Ivy's birth record, I cannot discount that she could have been married before.

On 29 May 1901, Charles Ridgeway, previously a labourer from Uplowman, Devon, had enlisted in the British Army. His age of 18 and 3 months on enlistment, would give a birth year of 1883, so it appears that he added a year to his age to sign up. Certainly not the first or last to do so, and if there were any additional urgency or motivation for doing this, it might have been because the Second Boer War was then in progress. Charles later, was at Fort RegentSaint Helier, Jersey and there transferred to the Royal Tank Corps, having previously been attached to the 3rd Hussars

He was discharged, after 21 years service, on 28 May 1922, at the termination of his period of engagement (Para 392 (xxi) KR), having served through the entirety of World War I. His address on discharge was 104, Barrington Street, Tiverton, which was his sister, Bessie Ann Quick's address. 

At some point, Charles had been wounded, which I believe is why he was awarded a pension at a rate of 31½d for life from 29 May 1922. (That's 18s 4½d per week, when 20 shillings = £1 in 1922 is worth £58.29 today.)

In 1939, Charles Ridgeway, Groom, was living at 5 Radcliffe Cottages, St Thomas, Devon. His date of birth on the 1939 Register is given as 24 Feb 1884. This was the date he was baptised, so either he was baptised on the very day he was born, or the actual date of his birth is lost in time. Living with him is his wife, Ivy E Ridgeway. There are then two closed entries, so it's possible that they had children (who may well be alive), but the records are not [yet] available.

Charles Ridgeway died at the beginning of 1955, aged 70, in Tiverton.

Ivy Edna Ridgeway died, in Exeter, in 1975, also aged 70.

Friday, 20 August 2021

Robert Thomas Bridle and Mary J Strange

Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium
WernervcCC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Robert Bridle (19) Errand boy, in 1911, was lodging at 35 Chestnut Grove, BalhamRobert T Bridle, seventh and penultimate child of Edwin Symons Bridle and Lucy Lindsey, married Mary J Strange, in Wandsworth, in 1915. Their daughter, Lucy Mary Bridle, was born on 1 Nov 1915. On 11 Dec 1915, R T Bridle (24) of 17, Caistor Rd, enlisted in the East Kent Regiment. On 17 Oct 1917, Robert Thomas Bridle (26), 36th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, husband of M. J. Bridle, of 17, Caistor Rd., Balham, London, died of wounds, no doubt sustained during The Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). He is buried in grave ref XI. I. 18. at Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.  

Friday, 13 August 2021

James Edmond and Sarah Ann Wood

Ponchydown House, formerly Ponchydown Inn
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Maigheach-gheal - geograph.org.uk/p/2856863

Sarah Ann Wood, eldest daughter of James Wood and Mary Ann Melhuish, married James Edmond (who was born, in 1888, in Prestonpans, Midlothian, approximately eight miles east of Edinburgh, Scotland), son of George Edmond, at the bride's parish of St. Mary’s, Kentisbeare on 8 May 1911. James Edmond's profession at the time of the marriage was Lodging House Keeper and Sarah's was Domestic Servant. Both gave their address as Ponchydown, Kentisbeare, undoubtedly the former Ponchydown Inn in Blackborough.

James and Sarah Ann had three children:
  1. James Roland George Edmond b. 24 Jul 1912, bap. 29 Dec 1912 at Blackborough, Devon, although the family's address on the baptism record was given as 2 New St, Prestonpans.
  2. Arthur Cecil Ronald Edmond born 23 Dec 1914
  3. Constance Mary Helen Edmond born 11 May 1917
On 23 Jun 1906, James Edmond had enlisted for Short Service in the Scots Guards and his trade on enlistment was Pithead Worker. Clearly he was brought back into service during World War I, because he died of wounds, in France, on 25 May 1918. His rank at discharge was Sergeant. His regiment had fought at the Second Battle of the Somme in Mar-Apr 1918, which may have been where he was wounded. I've not been able to discover where he might be buried.

Devington Park, Exminster
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Sarah Charlesworth - geograph.org.uk/p/990195
A huge complex of apartments, housed in what was once the Devon Mental Hospital.

Sarah Ann Edmond of The Mental Hospital, Exminster (originally Devon County Lunatic Asylum, Exminster), widow, died on 4 Dec 1933, leaving her effects to her son James Roland George Edmond, Guardsman. 

Constance M H Edmond, in 1939, Incapacitated, was resident at the The Royal Western Counties Institution For Training And Treatment Of Mental Defectives, Starcross. "Originally known as the Western Counties Idiot Asylum, this institution opened in 1864 in a house and land, rented from W.R. Courtenay, 11th Earl of Devon." "It later became known as the Western Counties Institution, Starcross, and was certified as 'a residential special school for mental defectives'. Residents were trained in carving, weaving, basketry, lace-making and carpentry, and worked on the institution's agricultural holdings." The institution was closed in 1986, and demolished

Constance M H Edmond had died in 1949, aged 32.

Thursday, 12 August 2021

James Wood and Mary Ann Melhuish

Kentisbeare : St Mary's Church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/4771675

James Wood, son of James Wood and Harriet Gollop, married Mary Ann Melhuish on 20 May 1883 at St. Mary’s church, Kentisbeare

James' elder brother, Henry Wood, had married a Mary Jane Melhuish, which seems an incredible coincidence. Henry's wife, Mary Jane had said she was from Plymouth, while Mary Ann lists herself as being from Clayhidon. But in neither case can I find a birth for either of them individually, much less find any connection between them. That's another mystery for another day.

James and Mary Ann had 11 children:
  1. Robert Wood born 1883, bap. 12 Jul 1885 in Kentisbeare *
  2. Sarah Ann Wood bap. 12 Jul 1885 in Kentisbeare
  3. Edith Maud Wood b. 24 Jul 1887, bap. 14 Aug 1887 in Kentisbeare
  4. Harriet Mary Wood b. 23 Nov 1888, bap. 13 Jan 1889 in Kentisbeare
  5. George Wood born 30 Aug 1890, bap. 5 Oct 1890 in Broadhembury
  6. Unnamed male Wood born Q1 1893 (Died in the same quarter)
  7. Eldred James Wood born 15 Mar 1894, bap. 1 Apr 1894 in Broadhembury. Eldred J Wood served in the Devonshire Regiment during World War I.
  8. Mabel Wood bap. 8 Aug 1896 in Kentisbeare (Died at 21 days old, buried 23 Aug 1896, also in Kentisbeare)
  9. Roland Ashford Wood b. 25 Jan 1898, bap. 13 Mar 1898 in Kentisbeare. Roland A Wood married Cicely Butt 1939. That year they were living at Bodmiscombe Wood, where Roland was a Farmer on his own account. Roland Ashford Wood died on 28 Feb 1975.
  10. Reginald Leonard Wood b. 8 May 1901, bap. ? 1901 in Blackborough
  11. Mabel Frances Wood b. 1904 (Died at 26 days old, buried 17 Jan 1904 in Blackborough)
* Baptism record for Robert Wood notes that he was 18 months old. That way, hopefully nobody noticed how soon after the wedding he'd arrived! :) 

In 1891 the family were living in Broad Road, Broadhembury, Honiton with James Wood (32) Agricultural Labourer, Mary A (29), Robert (7), Sarah A (5), Edith M (3), Harriet M (2) and George (0).

But by 1901, they were back in Kentisbeare at Hollis Green, with James Wood (43), Mary A (39), Edith (13), Harriet M (12), George (10), Eldred J (7) and Roland A (3). I've been unable to find either Robert or Sarah Ann in 1901. 

In 1911, at Cobblers Hall, Kentisbeare, were James Wood (53), Mary Ann (49), Sarah Ann Wood (25) Domestic Servant Cook, and Reginald Leonard Wood (9).

James Wood died in 1918, aged around 61.

In 1939, Mary Ann Wood, Widow, was living at 15, Blackborough with her youngest son, Reginald Leonard who was then employed as a Rabbit Trapper. 

Reginald Leonard Wood of 15 Blaydon Cottages, Blackborough, died on 18 Jun 1954 at Tiverton and District Hospital. As he left his effects to his widowed mother, Mary Ann Wood, we can probably conclude that he had not married. 

Mary Ann Wood died in 1955, aged 91.

Broadhembury
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Stowell - geograph.org.uk/p/6855

Wednesday, 11 August 2021

Charles Awton and Mary Maurice

St Michael, Awliscombe, Devon - East end
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/1726261

Charles Awton married Mary Maurice at the church of St Michael and All AngelsAwliscombeEast Devon on 13 Apr 1762. The family name was probably really, and certainly became, Horton, but I'll reproduce what was written in the church records at the time - that was undoubtedly as a result of the Devonshire accent and the precedent set by the spelling of the village name.

Charles and Mary had at least nine children, all baptised in Awliscombe:
  1. Betty Awton bap. 6 Jun 1762 
  2. John Awton bap. 7 Apr 1765 (John, son of Charles and Mary, was buried on 10 Feb 1782. He will have been 17. Hence reusing the name the next day.)
  3. William Awton bap. 22 May 1768
  4. Charles Awton bap. 9 Sep 1770
  5. Nancy Awton bap. 2 Jul 1775
  6. Jenny Awton bap. 19 Apr 1778 (Later calling herself Jane)
  7. Henry Awton bap. 14 Jan 1781 (Presume died as an infant)
  8. John Awton bap. 11 Feb 1782
  9. Henry Awton bap. 9 Jan 1785
Reenactors in the uniform of the 33rd Regiment of Foot (Wellington's Redcoats), who fought in the Napoleonic Wars between 1812 and 1816. (Slightly later than William Horton's time.)
“The 33rd Regiment was unquestionably the best trained regiment in the British Army at this time (1765 -1795).” [SourceWyrdLight.com, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Most of the Awtons I've been unable to trace forward, however, William Horton, when he was living with his sister, Jane Gollop, in Widworthy, in his later life, in 1841 and 1851, is described as a Chelsea Pensioner. William Horton had served with Marquess Cornwallis33rd Regiment of Foot (the real one, not the reenactors, but this does help to visualise him in his red coat, looking like an extra in a Jane Austen drama). He was discharged on 21 Apr 1796: 

William Horton, Private of the Aforesaid Regiment, born in the parish of Orliscomb (sic), in or near the Market Town of Honiton, in the county of Devon, aged twenty-six years (ish) and by Trade a Labourer, hath served honestly and faithfully in the said Regiment, five years and eight months, but being lame of the right arm from a Wound received at Bois-de-duk (sic) on the 15th October 1794, which renders him unfit for service ...

The regiment took part in the disastrous Flanders Campaign during the French Revolutionary Wars (War of the First Coalition). In 1794, Bois-le-Duc (French) ('s-Hertogenbosch a.k.a. Den BoschNetherlands) was taken by French troops, and in this case those of the newly created young republic. The Siège de Bois-le-Duc (1794) took place from 23 Sep to 5 Oct 1794, so it's clear that William Horton was there around that time, when he received his injuries.

Despite this, William Horton lived until the age of 84 and was buried, on 27 Mar 1853, in the churchyard of St Cuthbert's church in Widworthy.

It hasn't been possible to find the burial for Charles Awton, but there is a burial of a Mary Auten, on 21 Jun 1837 - the day after Queen Victoria ascended to the throne - in Awliscombe, who had lived to the age of 100. That would have made her 25 at the time of the 1762 marriage, so it looks entirely likely. 

Churchyard, Awliscombe
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2784088

Monday, 9 August 2021

William Northcott and Emma Jane Wood

Fore Street, Cullompton with the grade II listed White Hart
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen McKay - geograph.org.uk/p/5497724

William Northcott married Emma Jane Wood, daughter of Henry Wood and Mary Jane Melhuish from Kentisbeare, Devon, in 1896. Five years earlier, in 1891, William Northcott (19) Blacksmith, had been a lodger at The White Hart, Fore Street, Cullompton, but I haven't been able to find him before that. 

William and Emma's children included: 
  1. Maud Wood, Emma's illegitimate daughter, born 1894 and baptised on 19 Feb 1895, when she was 14 months old, in Kentisbeare
  2. William Henry Northcott born 8 Mar 1897 (not seen after 1911)
  3. Arthina Northcott born 14 Oct 1898, bap. 2 Nov 1898 in Cullompton
  4. Elizabeth Northcott born 1900 (died 1900 aged 0)
  5. Charles John Northcott born 23 Feb 1902, bap. 23 Mar 1902
  6. Albert James Northcott born 30 Aug 1903, bap. 16 Sep 1903 in Cullompton (died 1904, aged 0)
  7. Florence Northcott born 25 Oct 1907, Emma's illegitimate daughter
The retreat, Cullompton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/4955997
The neighbouring house in the row on the left, also listed, is Church Cottage.

In 1901, William Northcott (31) Blacksmith Journeyman from Branscombe, Devon (not identified relevant birth), wife Emma Jane (30) from Kentisbeare, along with Emma's daughter, Maud Wood (7), William Henry Northcott (4) and Arthenia Northcott (2) were living at Church Cottages, Cullompton.

William Northcott (33) died and was buried on 15 May 1904, in Cullompton.

Charles John Northcott was registered at Elmore School, Tiverton in 1908, with his address shown as Elmore Workhouse. In 1911, Emma Northcote (sic) (37) Widow, Laundress was living at 7 Rices Court, West Exe South, Tiverton with William (14) Errand Boy, Arthina (12), Charles (9) and Florence (3). 

Charles John Northcott (17) joined the Royal Tank Corps on 19 Aug 1919.

In 1917, Emma J Northcott had remarried to Arthur Southcott. What were the chances?

Arthur Southcott, born 30 Jul 1883, bap. 9 Aug 1883 at St Peter’s Church Tiverton, therefore 12 years younger than his wife, was the son of Frederick Southcott and Eliza Harris

Arthur Southcott died in 1935, in his early 50's.

In 1939, Emma J Southcott, Widowed again, was living at 7 Bartows Causeway, Tiverton with Dorothy A Evans (Arthina Northcott had married Ernest F J Evans in 1918), Laundress, and Dorothy Florence Northcott (b. 16 Nov 1916 - mother's maiden name was Northcott, so appears to be Arthina's illegitimate daughter), who worked at the Lace Factory and one other person. Emma Jane Southcott died in 1947. 

Tiverton : Bartows Causeway
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/5699381

Monday, 2 August 2021

Frederick John Bridle and Florence Melita Louisa Coleman

Medjez-El-Bab Memorial Verity CridlandCC BY 2.0

Frederick John Bridle, youngest child of John Lucas Bridle and Alice Brewer, married Florence Melita Louisa Coleman, in Bristol, in 1934. 

They had a daughter in 1935. And in 1939, we find them in Wells Road [Totterdown], Bristol, with Frederick working as a "Labourer Arp Shelters". 

Frederick John Bridle (30), Driver, Royal Army Service Corps, son of  J. and Alice Bridle; husband of Florence Melitia Bridle, of Totterdown, Bristol, died on 9 Feb 1943. He is buried at Medjez-El-Bab War Cemetery, near Majaz al BabTunisia. (During World War II, Tunisia was the scene of Operation Torch (8 November 1942 – 13 May 1943), which was the Allied invasion of North Africa. CWGC Commonwealth War Graves in Béja & Medjez-el-Bab, Tunisia, North Africa.)

Frederick's widow, Florence M L Bridle, died in 1988, at 78, in Bristol.

Wednesday, 14 July 2021

James Shopland and Loveday Jane Stone

Bridge and Uplowman church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Smith - geograph.org.uk/p/4097757

Loveday Jane Stone, third daughter of Frederick James Stone and Loveday Jane Land, married James Shopland, son of James Shopland and Caroline Sydenham, at St Peter’s ChurchUplowman on 2 Nov 1904. Witnesses were Mary Ann Stone, the bride's sister and Frederick James Stone, most likely her father. 

James Shopland's father, James Shopland (1850-1908), was a Wheelwright and Carpenter of Chevithorne Village, Tiverton. In 1901, James Shopland (16) had been employed as a Dairyman's Labourer to Samuel B Thornton, residing at The Island Cottage, Lowman Green, Tiverton. Then, on 8 Jun 1901, adding two years to his age and claiming to be 18 years and 3 months, James Shopland, from Chevithorne, enlisted for Short Service in the Devonshire Regiment.

James and Loveday Jane had at least five children:
  1. Frederick James Shopland born 19 Nov 1905, bap. 17 Dec 1905 at St Peter's Church, Tiverton, as the family's address at the time of this baptism was 3 Adam's Court, Barrington Street, Tiverton. In 1927, he married Elizabeth A P Cox and in 1939, they were living at 131 Eden Grove, Bristol. Frederick James Shopland died in 1971, in Weston-super-Mare.
  2. Loveday Jane Shopland, born 14 Feb 1907, bap. 17 Feb 1907 at Cove. In 1928, Loveday Jane Shopland married Leonard Southcott in Bristol. Their address in 1939 was 34 Pylle Hill Crescent, Bristol. Leonard Southcott died, aged 47, in 1950, in Bristol and in 1952, Loveday Jane Southcott remarried to a James J Basten-Rank. James J B Rank died, aged 68, in 1966, in Weston-super-Mare. Despite this second marriage, her death in 1995, in Taunton Deane, is registered under Loveday Jane Southcott. 
  3. Albert Geoffrey Shopland born 21 Jul 1908. In 1930, Albert Geoffrey Shopland married Annie Richards in Bristol and in 1939 were living at 3 Chessington Avenue, Bristol. Albert G Shopland died, in Britol, aged 35.
  4. Sidney Arthur Shopland bap. 27 Feb 1910 at Bickleigh. On 13 Jun 1929, Sidney Arthur Shopland enlisted in the Royal Artillery. Haven't been able to find a marriage, but Sidney A Shopland died, aged 58, in 1968, in Bristol.
  5. John James Shopland born 1911. There is more than one John Shopland in the relevant areas and none specifically listed as John James, so it hasn't yet been possible to isolate relevant records for him going forward.
Seckerleigh Farm
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1767262

In 1911, the family, living at New Cottages, Seckerleigh Farm, Halberton, consisted James Shopland (27) Farm Labourer, Loveday Jane (27), Frederick James (6), Loveday Jane (4), Albert Geoffrey (3), Sidney Arthur (1) and boarder, Robert Charles Harris (38) Farm Labourer, from Penzance, Cornwall. 

In 1939, Loveday Jane Shopland (née Stone) was living at 34 Pylle Hill Crescent, Bristol, with her daughter, Loveday Jane Southcott. She was listed as married, but there was no sign of James. Loveday Jane Shopland died, aged 56, in 1941, in Taunton, Somerset. James Shopland died, in Bristol, in 1955.

Pylle Hill Crescent
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Thomas Nugent - geograph.org.uk/p/2566288

Wednesday, 7 July 2021

William George Beamer and Elsie May Carver

HMS Impregnable in the Hamoaze off Devonport Dockyard

William George Beamer, second son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, at age 16, in 1901, was a member of the crew of HMS Impregnable the 1st Rate (Training Ship For Boys), in the HamoazeDevonport off MakerSt Germans, Cornwall. After spending nineteen years in the reserve fleet at Devonport, HMS Impregnable became the Royal Navy's second boys' training ship at Devonport in 1862. (Regular readers might remember that my great-grandfather, David Jones, had served on the Navy's first boys' training ship, HMS Implacable).

Having signed up for a further 12 years in the Royal Navy, on 4 Feb 1903, William was discharged, invalided, on 8 Jun 1905. Then on 9 Sep 1905, he enlisted in the British Army in the Devonshire Regiment. One wonders what condition was classed as invalid for the Navy, but still fit for the Army.

Triq il-Fortizza - L-Inhawi ta' Pembroke Frank Vincentz, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, next we find William George Beamer (26), in 1911, with the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, stationed at Saint Georges Barracks, Malta. (Part of the Pembroke Army Garrison, at Pembroke, Malta, not far from St. Julian's.) (And this is the second relative I've found stationed in Malta in 1911.)

William George Beamer married Elsie May Carver at the Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity, which was located in Southside Street/Friars Lane, Barbican, Plymouth, on 17 May 1916. This church no longer exists because it was was destroyed in the Second World War and never rebuilt or replaced. 

Elsie May Carver, born on 22 Nov 1894, had been baptised on 16 Dec 1894 at Holy Trinity Church and, was the daughter of Charles Frederick Carver from Clerkenwell, London and Frances Rundle, native of Plymouth. (She was Frances Foster at the time of their marriage, so may have been a widow. If she's related to the Rundle clan in Cornwall - not a great stretch from Plymouth - then we've just gone round in yet another great big circle.) In 1911, the family, including Elsie May (16), had lived at Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street.

William George Beamer was the recipient of a Silver War Badge, having been discharged from the Machine Gun Corps on 30 Mar 1917, under King's Regulation 392 (xvi) “No longer physically fit for war service". 

"He has a Ministry of Pensions record card which shows him as 22105 MG, residing at 13 Walson Rd, Plymouth. He was discharged on 30.3.17. Cause - deafness. He was also entitled to the Silver War Badge number 197170."

(The Silver War Badge was designed to be worn on civilian clothes after early discharge from the army. The accompanying certificate will have read, "Served with honour and was disabled in the Great War. Honourably discharged on ...")

Elsie's younger brother, Charles Frederick Carver (b. 1898), 5th (Prince of Wales's) Battalion (Territorials), Devonshire Regiment, son of Charles F. and Frances Carver, of 5, Artizan's Dwellings, Notte St., Plymouth, was killed in action on 20 Jul 1918 and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France. 

In 1939, William G Beamer, Skilled Labourer HM Dockyard, wife Elsie M Beamer and John F Carver (b. 1902), Road Repair Labourer (Elsie's brother), were still living at 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, Plymouth - buildings in that street were destroyed in the Second World War and demolished. 

William George Beamer, once more of 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, died on 1 Jan 1956 and left £605 4s 10d to his widow, Elsie May Beamer. 

Elsie May Beamer died in the 4th quarter of 1973, aged 79.

Thursday, 1 July 2021

Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton

St Paul Street and St Paul's Church, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/3417969

Alfred Beamer, Private RMLI of Cecil Street, Plymouth, son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Emily Luxton (b. 22 Jun 1882, bap. 9 Jul 1882, at St Peter’s Church Tiverton), daughter of James Luxton and Anna Maria Hawkins, on 14 Dec 1905, at St Paul's Church, Tiverton. Emily's address at the time of the marriage was Heathcoat Square, Tiverton. Emily's younger sister, Jessie Luxton, was one of the witnesses (bridesmaid perhaps).

Emily's father, Sergeant James Luxton (b. 1841 in Taunton, Somerset), had served in the British Army for 13 years, 320 days, with the 10th Reg Of Foot between 1860 and 1874. He spent over nine years serving abroad in the Cape of Good Hope, St Helena, Japan, China and the Straits Settlements. He was discharged in 1874 as he had been found unfit for further service. On the 1881 census, James Luxton (40), described himself as Grocer (Chelsea Pensioner) in Bampton Street, Tiverton. James Luxton died in 1886, aged just 45.

In 1891, Emily lived in Sewards Court, Leat Street, Tiverton, where her widowed mother worked as a silk lace mender and all of her older siblings worked at the lace factory (Heathcoat Lace Factory, Tiverton, Devon) - her brother Arthur being a machine boy there already at age 10. By 1901, Emily and her younger sister, Jessie, had become silk winders, working at the lace factory too.

Former workers' housing, Heathcoat Square, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk/p/6690635

Alfred and Emily's son, Alfred James, was born on 15 Mar 1908 and baptised on 29 Mar 1908 at St Peter’s Church, Stonehouse, Plymouth. But the infant died, in the third quarter of 1908, having bearly reached six months of age.

Alfred Beamer, who had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 15 Aug 1896, just shy of his 16th birthday, was discharged, invalided, on 15 Oct 1908. On 7 Mar 1909, Alfred Beamer (29) Labourer of 40 Neswick St, Plymouth, was admitted to the Devon and Cornwall Sanatorium for Consumptives Didworthy

Consumption was another name for Tuberculosis. The record shows that Alfred had first developed the disease 7 months previously - which ties in with the date he was discharged from the Royal Marines - when he was discharged from the sanitorium on 15 Jun 1909. In the notes it says, "light work - dead".

Such a concession! What kind of light work can the dead do, FFS? 

By 1911, Emily Beamer (28), widow, had returned to Tiverton, at 1 Melbourne Street and was again working at the Heathcoat Lace Factory, as a spinner.

In the 4th quarter of 1912, Emily Beamer remarried to a John Heard, in Tiverton. The couple don't appear to have any children. I've not been able to identify when John Heard died, but by 1939, Emily had been widowed again and was living with a single lady, Beatrice E Gollop, at 26 Castle Street, Tiverton

Emily Heard died, in Tiverton, in 1962, aged 79.

Castle Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/6587133

Tuesday, 23 March 2021

Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman

Royal Marines' Stonehouse Barracks, Durnford Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth

And so we come to the 5th of Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway's offspring, Tom Stone, who was born on 11 Dec 1861, in Ashbrittle, Somerset. 

In 1871, aged 9, Tom Stone was living at home with his parents and siblings in Ashbrittle. Then, aged 18, in 1880, Tom enlisted in the Royal Marines and, in 1881, aged 19, he is listed on the census as a Private R M L I - Royal Marine Light Infantry (RMLI) - at what was then called Stoke Damerel.

At 18, Tom was 5' 6¾", fair complexion, dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Later, his record states, "Right little finger amputated through second phalanx."

There's a record of a marriage, in the 1st quarter of 1889, between Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman. However, the British Royal Marines Marriage Registers, gives the date they married as 5 Apr 1893 and list the place of marriage as the Register Office, East Stonehouse. As there was no such thing as a Register Office (until after 1929), I wonder if this marriage took place in Stonehouse Barracks. There are civil registrations for both dates. This comment from Peter Calver at Lost Cousins, potentially provides the explanation, as it probably applies to Marines too, "... soldiers needed the permission of their commanding officer if they wanted the marriage to be recognised (which is why you will sometimes come across a couple who married each other twice)."

Either marriage was a little on the late side, mind you: 
  1. Archer Henry Stone (Archie), born 28 Mar 1889 in Plympton, Devon, bap. 21 May 1889, at the Wesleyan Methodist church, Tamerton Foliot
  2. Frederick Thomas Stone, born 20 Jan 1892
  3. Beatrice May Stone, born 14 Mar 1894, in Plympton (nothing after 1911)
  4. Bertram Charles Stone, born 24 Feb 1899 (died 2nd quarter of 1899)
  5. Leslie Victor Stone, born 1901. On 11 Apr 1919, aged 18, Leslie Victor Stone joined the Royal Tank Corps, but nothing further after that.
  6. Rosina Kathleen Stone, born 14 Apr 1903
St Paul Street, Plymouth (number 9 is the darkest caramel coloured one)
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

In 1901 the family were living at 9, St Paul Street, East Stonehouse, with Tom Stone (39) listed as a Marine Pensioner. (Tom served in the Royal Marines for 21 years (+ 2 days), from 11 Mar 1880 until 13 Mar 1901, and then enlisted in the Royal Fleet Reserve on 3 Jul 1901.) Also listed were Margaret (35), along with children; Archie (12), Frederick (9), Beatrice (7) and Leslie (0). 

Archer Henry Stone enlisted in the Royal Marines, aged 14, on 11 Nov 1903.

Tom Stone, General Labourer and Marine Pensioner, died, aged 43, on 2 May 1905, from Pulmonary Tuberculosis, at 3 Ashley Place, Plymouth.

Then just two years later, on 11 Nov 1907, Archie Stone died at the Royal Naval Hospital (Medway Maritime Hospital) in Gillingham, Kent, of a Tubercle of the lung (Tuberculosis again) and cardiac failure. He was just 18.

In 1911, Margaret Stone, widowed and in receipt of Parochial Relief, was living in East Stonehouse, with her two youngest, Leslie V (10) and Rosina K (7). Frederick had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1907 and Beatrice (17) was working as a Servant for Samuel Reed, Hairdresser and Tobacconist, in Devonport.

Margaret Erne Stone died, on 1 Sep 1921, at around 55 years, and probate was granted to her son, Frederick Thomas Stone, on 24 Dec 1921.

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If you're related to any of the people written about, I'm guessing you'll recognise them from the surnames. If you are, do please get in touch.