Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Wales. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wales. Show all posts

Monday, 30 January 2023

William Thomas Eastabrook and Catherine Eliza Authers

Mulberry Street, New York City (c. 1900) Library of Congress

William Thomas Eastabrook, elder son of Richard Eastabrook and Susana Derry, married Catherine Eliza Authers, daughter of Henry Authers and Susannah Osmond, in the 3rd quarter of 1871, in Stoke Damerel, Devon.

Registered as Caroline Authers (1854 M Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 253), born 25 Feb 1854 and baptised, as Eliza Caroline Authers, on 12 Mar 1854 at St Peter, Plymouth, she was 17 at the time of her marriage.

William and Catherine had at least eleven children:

  1. William Henry Authers Eastabrook b. 17 Apr 1872 J Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 308.
  2. Susanna Eastabrook b. 11 Apr 1874 in Manhattan, New York, United States. Birth record states that she was the "Mother's 2nd child". Died, aged 2, on 2 Sep 1876 and was buried on 4 Sep 1876 at Evergreen Cemetery, on the borders Brooklyn and Queens, New York.
  3. Unnamed male Eastabrook b. 3 Aug 1876 in Manhattan, New York.
  4. John Samuel Eastabrook b. 21 Dec 1877 in New York, USA.
  5. Catherine Eliza Eastabrook b. 1879 J Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 323, died at 8 months, on 30 Jan 1880 (1880 M Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 283), buried 8 Feb 1880 in Stoke Damerel.
  6. Susannah Catherine Easterbrook b. 20 Mar 1881 J Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 327, bap. 24 Jun 1881 at St Mary's Devonport.
  7. Beatrice Alberta Eastabrook b. 28 Jul 1883, bap. 17 Aug 1883 at St Mary's Devonport. (Seem to have missed the GRO registration.)
  8. Ethel May Eastabrook b. 16 Dec 1885 (1886 M Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 318), bap. 22 Jan 1886 at St Mary's Devonport.
  9. Harry Clifford Eastabrook b. 17 Sep 1888 (1888 D Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 305). (Not found baptism.)
  10. Eliza Ellen Eastabrook b. 1891 M Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 308, died, in 1892 M Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 299.
  11. Lawrence Aubrey Eastabrook b. 24 Nov 1897 (1898 M Qtr in STOKE DAMEREL Vol 05B Page 309), bap. 9 Jan 1898 in Devonport, Devon.
On the baptisms of Susannah in 1881, Beatrice in 1883 and Ethel in 1886 William Thomas Eastabrook is described as Seaman R.N. and the family's address as 26, St John Street, Devonport, Stoke-Damerel. On that for Lawrence in 1898, R.N. and living at 42 Palmerston St, Stoke, Plymouth.

In 1871, just before his marriage, William Eastabrook (21) Butcher (as had been his father before him), was a Servant in the household of Sarah Payne (27) Butcher, in Morice Town, Devonport, Plymouth.

On 1 Jan 1873, William Thomas Eastabrook, from Stoke Damerel, Devonport, with birth date given as 10 Aug 1849 (his birth was registered in the 3rd quarter of 1848, so this seems to be a year out), joined the Royal Navy, as a Butcher. At that time being 5 ft 2 in, with brown hair, grey eyes and a ruddy complexion. He was assigned to HMS Audacious (1869), which from 23 Nov 1871 - 17 Mar 1874 served as a Coast Guard Ship at Hull, in the Humber. It appears that William Thomas was discharged at Hull on 17 Apr 1873.

By Apr 1874, we find the couple in Manhattan, New York for the birth of their 2nd child. They had clearly emigrated and this, it must be remembered, is within a decade of the American Civil War. History of NYC - 1870s.

The family's address on the burial record for daughter, Susanna, was 168 Mulberry St, New York. Mulberry Street, is a narrow thoroughfare that includes parts of Chinatown and Little Italy in The Five Points neighbourhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Five Points gained international notoriety as a densely populated, disease-ridden, crime-infested slum. "Nicknamed 'Death's Thoroughfare', it was here, where the street crooks its elbow at the Five Points, that the streets and numerous alleys radiated in all directions, forming the foul core of the New York slums." So notorious, Manhattan's Mulberry Street has been subject of books, films and music.

On 8 Oct 1878, William T Eastabrook became a naturalised American citizen. The record gives his address as 20 N Moore St, New York and his occupation as Milkman. Witnessing his naturalisation was Henry Authers (wife's father).

They had stayed in New York for around five years, but returned to the UK by the time of the birth of fifth child, Catherine Eliza Eastabrook, in 1879.

On 26 Feb 1880, William Easterbrook (sic) (leaving out the Thomas), from Devonport, Devon and giving his date of birth as 9 Aug 1856 - one day adrift from that on the previous naval record and having now lost eight years in age - joined the Royal Navy as a Stoker 2nd Class, this time advancing to Chief Stoker and serving for 20 years, until he was pensioned on 28 Feb 1900.

In 1881, transcribed as William I Easterbrook (sic) (32) Stoker RN (at sea) is listed at 26, St John Street, Devonport, Stoke Damerel with Catherine E Easterbrook (27), William H A Easterbrook (9), John S Easterbrook (4) born in the United States; ? Easterbrook (0) Daughter [later named Susannah Catherine]; K T Easterbrook (20) Sister [mystery - not identified birth] Nurse and Eliza Arthers (sic) (20) Tailoress - Catherine's younger sister.

In 1891, still in St John Street, Devonport, were Catherine Easterbrook (37) Dressmaker; William H A Easterbrook (19) Blacksmith; John S Easterbrook (14), Catherine Easterbrook (10) [Susannah Catherine]; Beatrice A Easterbrook (7), Ethel M Easterbrook (5), Harry C Easterbrook (2) and Eliza E Easterbrook (0). William was at sea with HMS Mildura from 18 Mar 1891 until 4 Nov 1891. She served primarily in Australian waters.

In 1901, William Esterbrook (sic) (49) Naval Pensioner Admiralty from Devonport, Devonshire, was living in North Road, Central Cardiff, with Catherine Eastabrook (47) Sub Postmistress; Catherine Esterbrook (20) Lady Clerk (Commercial); Beatrice Esterbrook (17) Post Office Assistant; Ethel Esterbrook (15) Apprentice to Stationer and Lawrence Esterbrook (3).

William Thomas Eastabrook of 80 Whitchurch Rd, Cardiff, died on 11 Jun 1908. His age was estimated as 52 - which would agree with the birth date in 1856 given on his second enlistment in the Royal Navy - he was actually 59 - and was buried in the parish of St John the Baptist Church, Cardiff. Probate was granted on 29 Jun 1908 to beneficiary, Catherine Eliza Easterbrook.

In 1911, Catherine Easterbrook (57), Widowed, Sub Postmistress from Plymouth, Devonshire, was still living in Central Cardiff with Harry Easterbrook (22) Railway Clerk; Ethel Easterbrook (25) Postal Assistant; Frank Powell (26) Boarder, Kitty Murrell (30) and Kitty Murrell (1) Visitors. (Daughter Susannah Catherine, known as Catherine and clearly also as Kitty, had, as Catherine Susannah, married Charles Murrell in 1907.)

C E Easterbrook from Devonport, Devon, was still living in Cardiff in 1921.

Catherine Eastabrook or Easterbrook (as it says on the Probate record) of 42 Llanishen St, Cardiff, died, aged 80, on 29 Jun 1934 J Quarter in BRIDGEND Volume 11A Page 853 and was buried at Cardiff, All Saints, leaving her effects to sons, William Henry Eastabrook and Harry Clifford Eastabrook.

Wednesday, 18 January 2023

Samuel Ebenezer Derry Eastabrook and Eliza Back

The 'Odd Fellows Hall', Ker Street, Devonport
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Mike Lyne - geograph.org.uk/p/2771775

Samuel Ebenezer Derry Eastabrook (b. 1849), son of Richard Eastabrook and Susana Derry, married Eliza Back (b. 1853), daughter of Thomas Back and Mary Drake, at The Anglican Church of Saint Saviour that was located on Lambhay Hill, The Hoe, Plymouth, on 7 May 1876. Both gave their address as Lambhay Hill at the time of their marriage. (The church was destroyed during the Second World War but the Church Hall is still standing.)

Samuel and Eliza had six children:

  1. Ellen Hepzibah Derry Easterbrook (sic) b. 9 Feb 1877 M Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B  Page 347, bap. 29 Jun 1879 at St Aubyn's Church, Devonport. Died, aged 2 y 10 m, in 1879 D Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 249, buried 2 Jan 1880.
  2. Thomas Samuel Eastabrook b. 19 Feb 1880 (1880 M Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 343), bap. 11 Apr 1880 at St Aubyn's Church, Devonport.
  3. William Ebenezer Eastabrook b. 28 Mar 1882 (1882 J Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 342), bap. 13 Aug 1886.
  4. Amelia Elizabeth Eastabrook b. 24 Jun 1884 (1884 S Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 335), bap. 13 Aug 1886.
  5. Ernest Richard Eastabrook b. 15 Feb 1886 (1886 M Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 326), bap. 13 Aug 1886.
  6. Samuel Patrick Eastabrook b. 18 Sep 1889 (no birth record found).
In 1881, Samuel Eastabrook (31) Labourer, Eliza Eastabrook (26) Tailoress and Thomas Eastabrook (1) were living at 40, Cannon Street, Devonport.

In 1886, William Ebenezer, Amelia Elizabeth and Ernest Richard were all baptised together at The Anglican Church of Saint Mary (St Mary's Church, Devonport). It no longer exists. Their father's occupation then was listed as Storehouse man and their address given as 19, Ker Street, Devonport.

In 1891, Eliza Eastabrook (37), Thomas S Eastabrook (11), William E Eastabrook (9), Amelia E Eastabrook (6) and Ernest R Eastabrook (5) were listed in Baring Street, Plymouth. Neither Samuel is listed anywhere.

In 1901, both Thomas S Eastabrook and William E Eastabrook are listed with the Royal Navy at Sea and in ports abroad, but I've not been able to locate records for any other members of the family, anywhere in the world.

On 6 Oct 1903, we find Samuel Eastabrook (54), Ellen Eastabrook (51), Emelia (sic) Eastabrook (19) and Samuel Eastabrook (14), arriving at Ellis Island, New York from Bermuda on the ship Pretoria (USS Pretoria (1897). The record gives their nationality as Great Britain, English and their residence as Bermuda. It also states Samuel's occupation as "late of Civil Service". One might speculate, therefore, that Samuel had been working at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda. It says they were arriving in New York, en route to England and that Samuel Sr had last been in the US 10 years previously. Their onward address in the UK was c/o 22 Union Street, Portsmouth, England. Interestingly, the record specifies that Samuel paid for his own passage, that Eliza's was paid for by her husband and both Amelia's and Samuel Jnr's were paid for by their father - which is how we can identify him as their child.

Eliza Eastabrook died at 53, in 1907 M Qtr in LAMBETH Vol 01D Pg 256. 

In 1911, S E D (Samuel Ebenezer Derry) Eastabrook (61) Widower, Railway Storekeeper was in Stockwell, London with A E (Amelia Elizabeth) Eastabrook (26) Daughter and E E (Ellen Elizabeth) Barker (64) Widow, Sister.

Samuel E D and Amelia Eastabrook appeared to be visiting Samuel's sister, Ellen at 36 Llanishen Street, Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales in 1921.

In 1939, both Samuel E Eastabrook and Amelia E Eastabrook were listed at 25 Norham Avenue, Southampton.

Samuel Ebenezer Derry Eastabrook died, aged 93, in 1943 D Quarter in WINCHESTER Volume 02C Page 196.

Amelia Elizabeth Eastabook died, aged 62 (1946 S Quarter in SOUTHAMPTON Volume 06B Page 480). "EASTERBROOK Amelia Elizabeth of 25 Norham-Avenue Shirley Southampton spinster died 22 August 1946 at the Borough Hospital Southampton Administration Winchester 14 November to Samuel Patrick Eastabrook motor car driver. Effects £442 11s. 11d."

There are many records of a Samuel Eastabrook of the correct age crossing the Atlantic in the 1920s, which suggest that Samuel Patrick Eastabrook worked as a First Class Waiter on vessels such as the RMS Mauretania, once Cunard’s most luxurious ocean liner. No records suggest that he ever married. Samuel Patrick Eastabrook died, aged 81, in 1970, in Winchester. 

Wednesday, 11 January 2023

Esther Kathleen Drake and Thomas Samuel Eastabrook and William Henry Lynch and Alfred William Gullick

St Mary's (Our Lady Star of the Sea), Saltcoats
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Leslie Barrie - geograph.org.uk/p/3379097

Esther Kathleen Drake (b. 1887), eldest daughter of Edward Charles Drake and Emma Jane Gloyne, married Thomas Samuel Eastabrook (b. 19 Feb 1880 in Devonport), eldest son of Samuel Ebenezer Derry Eastabrook and Eliza Back, in the 2nd quarter of 1906 in Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales. 

(Thomas Samuel Eastabrook's mother, Eliza Back, was the daughter of Thomas Back and Mary Drake, who married in East Stonehouse, Devon in 1852, so undoubtedly we've just gone around in yet another circle.)

Thomas and Esther had four children:
  1. Ellen Kathleen Eastabrook b. 5 Jul 1906 S Quarter in CARDIFF Volume 11A Page 351, bap. 29 Jul 1906 at St John the Evangelist Church, Canton, Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales
  2. Ronald Edmund Thomas Eastabrook b. 1908 M Quarter in LAMBETH Volume 01D Page 389
  3. Minnie Esther Eastabrook said to be born b. 26 May 1909, reg. 1910 S Quarter in PORTSMOUTH Volume 02B Page 371
  4. Richard Ernest Eastabrook b. 1911 D Quarter in PORTSMOUTH Volume 02B Page 748. Died 24 Nov 1941, see below.
In 1911, Esther Eastabrook (23) Married, was living in North End And Buckland, Portsmouth with daughter, Ellen Eastabrook (4) born in Roath Cardiff, Glamorganshire; Ronald Eastabrook (3) born in Brixton, London and Minnie Eastabrook (0) born in Buckland, Portsmouth. Thomas had previously been attached to HMS Victory II, a land based training establishment for stokers and engine artificers, based in Portsmouth, until January that year, however, at the time of the census in 1911, Thomas Samuel Eastabrook (31) was with HMS Speedwell (1889) in Sidmouth, Devon.

Having joined the Royal Navy on 23 Oct 1899, Thomas Samuel Eastabrook was lent to the Australian Government in 1912 and served with the Royal Australian Navy. Stoker Thomas Samuel Eastabrook of HMAS Brisbane (1915), was accidentally killed, aged 37, on 24 Feb 1917, it says from multiple injuries as the result of a fall. Thomas is buried in Plot C Grave 341 Capuccini Naval Cemetery, Malta (Kalkara Naval Cemetery) (Image courtesy of MilitaryImages.net).

Esther K Eastabrook then married William Henry John Lynch, (b. 11 Jul 1887), son of John Joseph Lynch (b. 1859 in Tipperary, Ireland, Bandsman Royal Irish) and Rosina Cole Harvey, in the 4th quarter of 1917, in Plymouth, Devon. 

Esther had one further son with her second husband:
  1. Hugh Lynch, b. 1917 D Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 337 (Mother's maiden name, wrongly, listed as EASTABROOK.)
William Henry Lynch had joined the Royal Navy on 18 Jun 1909, as a Stoker 2nd Class, progressed to Leading Stoker and was discharged on 5 Oct 1921, having been invalided. William H and Esther Lynch were living in Plymouth, Devon in 1921. William Henry Lynch was said to have died around 1926, but in fact there is a William H Lynch, whose date of birth is 11 July 1887, living at 37 Union Street, Plymouth in 1939. [To be further investigated.]

Esther Kathleen Drake Eastabrook Lynch, however, married for the third time to Alfred William Gullick in 1928, in Saltcoats, Ayrshire. She's listed as Esther Kathleen Drake Easterbrook under Scotland Roman Catholic Parish Marriages - from which this marriage likely took place at St Mary's (Our Lady Star of the Sea)Saltcoats. At Scotland's People (Ref: 576 / 1 / 32), this marriage is listed as being between Alfred William Gullick and Esther Kathleen Lynch.

Alfred William Gullick (b. 4 Jun 1882 in Stonehouse, Devon, reg. 1883 D Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 288, bap. 1883 as Alfridus Gulielmus Gullick at the Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of Saint Mary and Saint Boniface, Plymouth), was the son of William Gullick, Private Royal Marines from Thrushelton, Devon and Hannah or Anna Maria Murphy from Ireland. Alfred William Gullick joined the Royal Navy in July 1899 as a Boy 2nd Class. He served until 1920 and, as was Esther's first husband, was lent to the Royal Australian Navy, in 1913, serving with HMAS Sydney (1912)HMAS Australia (1911)HMAS Melbourne (1912) and at HMAS Cerberus, before returning to HMA London Depot.

Esther's son by her first husband, Richard Ernest Eastabrook, Dick, was lost with the sinking of HMS Dunedin (HMS Dunedin Society), on Thursday 24th November 1941. Plumber 3rd Class, Richard Ernest Eastabrook is remembered on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Panel 56, Column 3. 

Alfred William Gullick died, at 74, in 1957, in Saltcoats.

Esther Kathleen Gullick died, aged 88, in 1975, also in Saltcoats. Ref: 662 /1 95. If there was any doubt, her mother's maiden name is listed as Gloyne.

Saturday, 31 December 2022

Edward Charles Drake and Emma Jane Gloyne

Former entrance to Roath Basin, Cardiff
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk/p/6404417

Edward Charles Drake, son of Edmund Drake and Esther Elizabeth Palmer, married Emma Jane Gloyne, daughter of Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes, on 12 Jul 1886 in Roath, Glamorgan, Wales. 

Edward Charles Drake's mother, Esther Elizabeth Palmer, was the older sister of Edward Oxford Palmer, who was married to Emma Jane's older sister, Charlotte Emma Gloyne. So, Charlotte's husband was Emma's husband's uncle - or Emma's husband was Charlotte's husband's nephew. The two couples' respective children will have been double-cousins, once removed and once not, I think. Working out family relationships just got very complicated!

Edward and Emma had eight children:
  1. Esther Kathleen Drake b. GRO Reference: 1887 J Quarter in CARDIFF Volume 11A Page 330
  2. Gladys Emma Drake b. GRO Reference: 1889 S Quarter in CARDIFF Volume 11A Page 334
  3. John Gloyne Drake b. 6 May 1891, GRO Reference: 1891 J Quarter in CARDIFF Volume 11A Page 342. Died 4 Jul 1915 (see below).
  4. Francis Oxford Drake b. GRO Reference: 1892 J Quarter in CARDIFF Volume 11A Page 396
  5. Helen Palmer Drake b. 7 February 1895 in Plymouth. (No GRO record.)
  6. Fred Silby Drake b. GRO Reference: 1895 D Quarter in MONMOUTH Volume 11A Page 16. Died, aged 4, in GRO Reference: 1900 J Quarter in DEVONPORT Volume 05B Page 253
  7. Constance Edith Drake b. GRO Reference: 1899 J Quarter in BRISTOL Volume 06A Page 8
  8. Florence May Drake b. GRO Reference: 1902 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 255
In 1891, Edward Drake (28) Iron Moulder, Emma Drake (29) and their first two daughters, Esther (3) and Gladys (1) were living in the household of Edward's parents, Edmund and Esther Drake in Moira Street, Cardiff.

In 1901, Edward C Drake (39) Iron & Brass Founder, was resident in Durnford Street, East Stonehouse, with wife Emma J Drake (40), Gladys E Drake (11), John G Drake (9), Francis O Drake (8), Helen P Drake (6) and Constance E Drake (2). Eldest daughter, Esther Drake (13) was staying with her grandparents, Edmund and Esther Drake, in Seymour Street, Roath.

In 1911, Edward Drake (49) Iron and Brass Founder, was still in Plymouth with wife Emma Drake (50) and daughters, Gladys Drake (21), Helen Drake (17), Constance Drake (12) and Florence (9). Esther Kathleen had married in 1906 and was living in North End, Buckland, Portsmouth; John Drake (19) Stoker, was in Chatham, Kent; haven't yet located Francis.

Emma Drake died, in 1912, age given as 51 - she was 54 (GRO Reference: 1912 S Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 276).

Son John Drake died at HMS Vivid (shore establishment 1890), the Royal Navy barracks at Devonport. John Drake had joined the Royal Navy, at 18, on 9 July 1909, at which time he was 5 ft 3½ in with a 33¾ inch chest, light brown hair, light brown eyes and a fair complexion. At the time of his death he was assigned to Vivid II, the Stokers and Engine Room Artificers School in Devonport. The note on his naval record states that he was DD (Discharged Dead) on 4 July 1915 in Sick Quarters, Devonport Depot as result of cycle accident. Inquest verdict:- Accidental death through cycle accident.


Edward Charles Drake (55) married Helen or Ellen Saull (48) on 23 Dec 1916, in Roath, Glamorganshire, Wales. He was still living in Cardiff in 1921.

Edward Charles Drake died, at 74, in 1935 (GRO Reference: 1935  D Quarter in PLYMOUTH  Volume 05B  Page 403).

Friday, 30 December 2022

Edward Oxford Palmer and Charlotte Emma Gloyne

The Melbourne Inn, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1777650
This pub on the corner of Cecil Street (left) and Wyndham Street, with its green glazed tiles, one of the toughest pubs in Plymouth, has been recommended for listing. Originally built in the 1700s, this Stonehouse pub was later named after British Prime Minister Lord Melbourne.

Edward Oxford Palmer, Seaman, son of Charles Palmer and Mary Oxford, married Charlotte Emma Gloyne, daughter of Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes at the The Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity on 9 Mar 1873. The church was destroyed during the Blitz in 1941 and demolished. 

The couple had one child:
  1. Charles Edward Samuel Palmer b. 9 Sep 1874 (GRO Reference: 1874 S Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 248), bap. 4 Oct 1874, in the Parish of Charles, Plymouth. (Charles Church was destroyed during the night of March 21st/22nd 1941.) The family's address was 8 Devonshire Street, Plymouth and Edward's profession was again listed as Seaman.
Edward Oxford Palmer, born 31 May 1844, had enlisted in the Royal Navy on 25 Apr 1859, shortly before his 15th birthday, as a Boy 2nd Class. At that time he was 5 ft and ½ inch, with a Fresh complexion, Light brown hair and Grey eyes. He had a scar on the left side of his chin and weighed 110 lbs. The ship on which he entered service was HMS Impregnable. He remained in the service until 1882, achieving the rank of Petty officer first class.

In 1881, living at 67, Cecil Street, Plymouth, were Edward Palmer (36) Quarter master royal navy; Charlotte Palmer (27) and son Charles Palmer (6).

Although, in 1891, Edward O Palmer (46) General Labourer was living in Roath, Cardiff, Wales, with Charlotte A Palmer (36) and son Charles (16) Fitter's Apprentice. (Charlotte's sister Emma Jane married in Roath.)

By 1901, the family had returned to Plymouth and were living in Alexandra Road, Ford, Devonport, with Edward Palmer (56) General Labourer; Charlotte Palmer (46), Charles Palmer (26) Steam Engine Fitter and Emma Gloyne (74) Widow, Former Monthly Nurse, Charlotte's mother in the household.

In 1902, son Charles Edward Palmer married Alice Amy Gamblen.

In 1911 and still living in Devonport, were Edward O Palmer (66) Naval Pensioner and Charlotte Palmer (56). Son, Charles Palmer (36) Engine Fitter at Government Dockyard, was also living in Devonport, with wife Alice Palmer (36) and Cyril Gamblen (5), inexplicably listed as a Niece (not Nephew). 

Edward Oxford Palmer died in 1913, aged 69. (GRO Reference: 1913 D Quarter in DEVONPORT Volume 05B Page 392.)

Then Edward and Charlotte's son, Charles Edward Palmer also died, on 17 Apr 1915, aged just 40 (GRO Reference: 1915 J Quarter in DEVONPORT Volume 05B Page 444). Probate was granted to Alice Palmer on 8 Jun 1915. The couple do not appear to have had any children. Alice Amy Palmer does not appear to have remarried and is listed in Plymouth in 1921 and again in 1939. She died, in Plymouth, in 1969, in what will have been her 95th year.


Charlotte Palmer died, at 75, in 1930. (GRO Reference: 1930 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 401.)

Wednesday, 6 April 2022

Walter Ward and Harriet Mary Penfold

Chiswick High Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/6619235

Harriet Mary Penfold Tubb, as she was registered upon her birth in 1884, daughter of Frederick William Penfold and Harriet Mary Tubb, it is reported, "...  did not go to Canada [as her siblings did] as she was 15 years old and had gone into service." And indeed, in 1901, we find Harriet M Penfold (16), as a General domestic servant in the employ of Joseph Wain (41) Draper and shopkeeper at 288, High Road, Chiswick, Middlesex. 

(Harriet's late paternal grandmother, Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn, was originally from Chiswick, so perhaps this had some bearing on the location?)

In 1903, we find Harriet in Hackney, for the birth of her first child. Then in the first quarter of 1906, Harriet, apparently known as Hetty, married Walter Ward, in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire. Unfortunately, it's been impossible to locate Walter on previous census returns, to be able to pinpoint where they coincided. We have to take it on trust that Gladys Grace is Walter's daughter, as she is later listed with the surname Ward, but there is no guarantee of this.

Walter and Harriet had at least seven children:
  1. Gladys Grace Penfold b. 1903 S Quarter in HACKNEY Vol 01B Page 539
  2. Walter Ernest Ward b. 1907 M Quarter in BRIDGEND Vol 11A Page 903
  3. William George Ward b. 1908 J Quarter in BRIDGEND Vol 11A Page 945
  4. Herbert Edward Ward b. 1910 J Quarter in BELPER Vol 07B Page 732
  5. Frederick John Ward b. 1912 M Quarter in BELPER Vol 07B Page 1346
  6. Alma Mary Ward b. 1914 M Qtr in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A 159, died age 6 in 1920 S Quarter in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A  Page 91 and buried on 17 Aug 1920 in Blackfordby, Leicestershire
  7. Mabel Joy Ward b. 10 Dec 1919 in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A 162
Walter Ward, 32 in 1914, will have been of an age to have served during World War I and although it would be difficult to isolate his service record, I think the evidence for this is the gap in children between 1914 and 1919. 

In 1911, living at 24 Sleetmoor Lane, Somercotes, Derbyshire, were Walter Ward (29) 'Night repairer under ground', born in Costock, Nottinghamshire (there's a birth registered in Loughborough, in 1882, which may relate); Harriet Mary (26) born in Chelsea; William Ward (34) 'Coal contractor under ground', Brother, born in Clay Cross, Derbyshire; Gladys Grace Ward (7), Walter Ernest Ward (4) born Nantymoel, Wales, William George Ward (3), born Caerau, Bridgend and Herbert Edward Ward (1) born Swanwick, Derbyshire.

So far, I've been unable to identify further records for this family, except Mabel Joy, who married Douglas A Clayton in Mansfield, Nottingham in 1939 and reportedly died, in Guelph, Wellington South, Ontario, Canada, in 1998.

Thursday, 10 March 2022

John Hartley and Anna Rookley

All Saints, Newby Place, Poplar - East end
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/2636648

John Hartley (b. 1846), son of John Hartley and Mary Blundell, married Anna Rookley, youngest daughter of John Rookley and Mary Ayres, in Poplar, London in Q2 of 1869, the most likely venue being All Saints Church, Poplar

Records suggest that John and Anna had four children:
  1. Arthur John Hartley b. 1869, died aged 0. Death registered 1869 D Quarter in GREENWICH  Volume 01D  Page 595. The birth didn't show up until the next quarter, 1870 M Quarter in GREENWICH Volume 01D Page 839.
  2. Walter James Hartley b. 1872 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 435. Died in 1891, aged 18, in West Ham.
  3. Elias John Hartley b. 1873 D Quarter in SOUTH SHIELDS Volume 10A Page 795
  4. Alice Anna Hartley b. 1878 M Quarter in PEMBROKE Volume 11A Page 870
In 1871, John Hartley (25) from Middlesex, England and Anna Hartley (25) from Devon, England, were lodging at Charlton Place, St Mary, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

In 1881, John Hartley (35) Engine Fitter from Bow, London, wife Anna (36) from Devon and daughter Alice A (4) born in Pembrokeshire, Wales, were living at 4, Edward Street, West Ham, London. Meanwhile, we find Walter Hartley (8) from Portsmouth and John Hartley (7) from Wales (clearly confused the children's birthplaces) visiting their aunt and uncle, James and Thomasin Ridgeway (Anna's sister), in Devon. This census is the only clue we have to John Hartley's occupation, which could explain the nomadic lifestyle and the assorted locations for the children's births. Each of those locations have ports, so he could be fitting engines to boats (or equally the railway, or in industry.)

Walter James Hartley died 1891 M Quarter in WEST HAM  Vol 04A Pg 34.

None of the family appear to be listed anywhere on the 1891 census.

John Hartley died, aged just 48, in 1895 M Quarter in WEST HAM Volume 04A Page 87. And in the same quarter of the same year, their 16-17 year old daughter, Alice Anna Hartley married John Watson Bell, in Poplar.  

In 1901, Anna Hartley (55) from Kentisbeare, Devon, listed as married rather than widowed, was living in the household of her now married daughter and son-in-law in Terrace Road, Plaistow (West Ham): John W Bell (32) Shipping Clerk, Alice Bell (23), Alice (5), Grace (4), John (2) and Beatrice (0).

In 1911, John Watson Bruce Bell (40), who was born in Canada, had become a Wharfinger, the keeper or owner of a wharf - today a wharfinger is usually called a "harbourmaster" - living with wife Alice Anna Bell (34), daughter Alice Anna Bell (15) who has become a Shorthand Typist; Grace Bell (14), Beatrice May Bell (10) and Effie Bell (5). Meanwhile, Jack Hartley (38) - Elias John - born in Newcastle, Durham a Shop Worker, was a boarder in Plaistow. There is no sign of Anna Hartley, who may have died or could have remarried.

Monday, 19 July 2021

Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey

St Paul Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

Frederick Thomas Stone, Leading Signalman, H.M.S. Sandhurst, of 9 St Paul's Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, second son of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, married Kathleen Mullarkey, tailoress, of 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, only daughter of Anthony Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, at the King Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, on 4 Aug 1923. 

Witnesses to the marriage were the bridegroom's first cousin, Charley Stone (best man); Rosina Kathleen Stone, the bridegroom's younger sister (bridesmaid perhaps), and Anthony Charles Mullarkey, the bride's brother who probably gave her away. The bridegroom's father, Tom Stone, and the bride's father, Anthony Mullarkey (both deceased), had been Royal Marines, as were Charley Stone and Anthony Charles Mullarkey. 

Frederick and Kathleen had two sons: 

  1. Frederick Anthony Stone born 25 July 1924
  2. Douglas John Stone born 27 Sep 1927
Frederick Thomas Stone had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a boy of 15, on 6 Jul 1907 and served until 31 March 1924. He then re-entered on 30 May 1932 as a Signalman. As he was still living in Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages in 1957, I think it safe to deduce that he served through both World Wars.

His naval record lists among his tattoos: an anchor on his right forearm; two female figures and a bird on his right forearm; Eagle, snake, Ensign, rose and thistle. Clasped hands and heart and 8 dots on left forearm. 

Royal Hospital School Bell Tower
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Jones - geograph.org.uk/p/2513717

In 1939, Frederick A Stone was a boarder at the Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy"). I've been unable to locate Frederick Thomas, Kathleen or son Douglas in 1939.

On 11 Aug 1943, Douglas J Stone appears on a "List or Manifest of Aliens Employed on the Vessel as Members of the Crew" of the Marquesa, as an apprentice on his 1st trip to New York. He was 16, 5' 4" and 123lbs.

Part of the old Buckland Hospital, Coombe Valley Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Baker - geograph.org.uk/p/5105714

Frederick Thomas Stone of 5 Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages, Old Folkstone Road, Dover, died on 11 Nov 1957, aged 65, at Buckland Hospital, Dover, leaving effects of £960 12s 5d to Frederick Anthony Stone, Chief Electrician R.N. and Douglas John Stone, Laboratory Assistant. As she isn't a beneficiary, Kathleen had presumably pre-deceased her husband, but I've [so far] been unable to identify the relevant record of her death.

Douglas John Stone died in 1985 in Kingsbridge, Devon, at 58.

Frederick Anthony Stone died, also in 1985, on 19 Mar, in Newport, Wales. He will have been 60. There is a record of a marriage of a Frederick A Stone in Newport, in 1950, which might explain his presence there. 

Thursday, 8 July 2021

James Beamer and Mary Jane Snell

Old Toll House, Briton Street, Bampton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Milestone Society - geograph.org.uk/p/6114414

James Beamerson of James Beamer and Rose Anna Smith, younger brother of Alfred Beamer and half-brother of Loveday Jane Land and John Land, formed a family with Mary Jane Snell - that's the maiden name listed on several of their children's birth registrations - but [so far] I've been unable to find a record of their marriage. Mary Jane is listed as being from Plymouth. 

James and Mary Jane had at least seven children:
  1. Mary Jane Beamer born Q2 1884 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. (Died and was buried, on 13 Apr 1884, in Bampton.)
  2. Ethel Anna Beamer (no civil reg), bap. 26 Apr 1885 in Bampton.
  3. (Unnamed male child) Beamer born Q3 1886 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. (Died in the same quarter, age 0.)
  4. Sarah Jane Beamer born Q3 1887 in Tiverton, mother's name SMALE
  5. Tom Beamer born Q3 1890 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name listed as SUELL. Bap. 3 Aug 1890 in Bampton.
  6. Rosanna Beamer born Q1 1893 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. Bap. as Rose Anna Beamer, on 30 Apr 1893, in Bampton. (Died, aged 16 months and was buried, on 22 Aug 1894, in Bampton.)
  7. Mary Ann Beamer registered Q1 1896 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name listed as SNELL. Bap. 29 Dec 1895 in Bampton. (Died in Q2 1901, aged 5. Buried on 27 Apr 1901 in Bampton.)
There could, of course, be other births that I've missed, particularly given the number of discrepancies in the information, such as the mother's maiden name, which I attribute to either errors in transcription, or registrars writing down what they heard, that the parents probably couldn't have read to check.

Ethel Ann Beamer (3) "British King" from Liverpool

This curious record appeared in my searches for this family and relates to an Ethel Ann Beamer, age 3, sailing on the "SS British King" from Liverpool, arriving in Philadelphia on 29 May 1888. Their intended destination was Chicago. Taken alone, I'd have ignored this and assumed that this was another Ethel Ann Beamer entirely. HOWEVER, in the box at the top right, it says "Accompanied by" Sarah Jane 8 months and Mary Jane 30, both of which fit. I've also found an equivalent record for Sarah Jane and both children appear on the passenger list, along with Mary Jane. It's hard to imagine them being able to afford to go to the US - and come back again - but equally hard to imagine the combination of those three names and ages cropping up together more than once. It's a mystery.

In 1891, James Beamer (39) Agricultural Labourer, wife Mary (35), Ethel A (6), Sarah J (3) and Tom (0), were living in Briton Street, Bampton

On 16 Oct 1894, James and Mary Beamer were both charged and bailed, accused of "Wilfully neglecting Rose Anna Beamer, a girl under the age of 16 years, to wit, 16 months, in a manner likely to cause unnecessary suffering and injury to health, at Bampton, on 15 August 1894, and on various other dates." They were found not guilty and acquitted. Was their crime being poor? 

In 1901, James Beamer (48) General Labourer, Mary Jane (42), Ethel (15), Tom (9) and Mary A (5), were living on the Tiverton Road, Bampton. Daughter, Sarah Jane (14), was employed as a General domestic servant, in the household of Henry Early, Watchmaker and jeweller, at 12, Angel Hill, Tiverton

Ethel Ann Beamer married William David Cappell on 24 Apr 1907, in Bampton.

Then in 1911, we find the family has "emigrated" to Wales. James Beamer (53) from Bampton, Devon was employed as a Coal miner hewer and living at 4 Price Street, Pentre in the Rhondda Valley, Glamorganshire with Mary (49), Tom (20) also working as a Coal miner hewer; Ethel Cappell (25), William Cappell (25) Son-in-law, and grandchildren, William (3) and Ethel (1).

They returned to England, as Mary Beamer died, aged 70, in 1927 in Taunton, Somerset. Then James Beamer died, in 1931, aged 77, also in Taunton. (William and Ethel Cappell lived in Rowford, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton in 1939, but I could find no further records for Sarah Jane after 1901 or Tom after 1911.)

4 Price Street, Pentre in the Rhondda Valley

Sunday, 21 March 2021

William Stone and Hannah Westcott

Whipples Farm, Holcombe Rogus
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/2803479

William Stone (bap. 1 Apr 1821 at St Peter's ChurchLangford Budville), eldest son of William Stone and Mary Thorne and thus oldest brother of my 2x great grandfather, Henry Stone, married Hannah Westcott in the third quarter of 1850, in the registration district of Wellington, Somerset. 

Hannah Westcott (10) was living at Tone Wharf, Wellington Somerset with her parents, Thomas and Ann Westcott, in 1841. She was born on 8 Feb 1831 and baptised Anna Westcott (due to pronunciation, probably) on 19 Jun 1831, at the The Lower Meeting Independent Formerly Presbyterian, Wellington, Somerset.

Tracking down the children of this marriage has been proving difficult, with no birth records for half of them, but include the following six: 
  1. William Stone b. 1851 in Devon (listed on 1861 census)
  2. Mary Ann Stone b. 1854 in Ashbrittle, Somerset (on 1861 census)
  3. Hannah Maria Stone b. 1861 Q3 in PONTYPOOL Vol 11A Page 122
  4. Thomas Stone b. 12 Aug 1864 in Usworth, Durham 
  5. Edith Ellen Stone b. 1866 Q4 in CHESTER LE STREET Vol 10A Page 42
  6. Isabella Stone b. 1870 Q3 in CHESTER LE STREET Vol 10A Page 479
Those I could find at the GRO, the mother's maiden name is listed as Westcott.

In 1851, William Stone (28), Agricultural Labourer, was living at Whipples, Holcombe Rogus, with wife Anah (21). Whipples Farmhouse, Tracebridge, is a Grade II Listed Building. Living at Whipples also was Henry Tremlett, a Dairyman, for whom William was presumably working. 

In 1861, however, William Stone (40), married, Pitman from Holcombe, Devon was a lodger in the house of Elizabeth Archer (50), widow at Nailers Shops, New Row, Usworth, Chester Le Street, Durham. While Hannah Stone (29) from Wellington, Somerset was living at Garndiffath, Trevethin, Pontypool, Monmouthshire, Wales with son William Stone (10) born in Devon, England and daughter, Mary Ann Stone, born in Ashbrittle, Somerset. 

There is no sign of any of them in 1871.

Mary Ann Stone (18) married Miles Handy in Chester Le Street, in 1872.

William Stone (55) died in the 3rd quarter of 1875, also in Chester Le Street.

In 1881, Hannah Stone (49) widow, mother-in-law, was living in the household of Miles Handy (35) Coal Miner from Wallsend, Northumberland and his wife, Mary A Handy (27) from Somerset. Also in the household were Thomas Stone (16) Coal Miner (putter) born in Usworth, Durham, brother-in-law and Isabella Stone (10) born in Washington, Durham, sister-in-law and William Handy (25) Coal Miner, boarder, also from Wallsend, Northumberland, Miles' brother.

Thomas Stone married Polly Beaty in 1888, in Chester Le Street. Edith Ellen Stone married in Chester Le Street, in 1889, but [as yet], I don't know who she married. And Isabella Stone married John Robert Brack, also in Chester Le Street, in 1890. (In 1881, John Brack had been staying with his uncle, Christopher Chambers, Colliery overman, from Killingworth, Northumberland.)

In 1891, Hannah Stone (59), widow, was living on her own means in the household of William Handy (34) Coal Miner at New Rows, Little Usworth, Chester Le Street - her home, but he presumably becomes head as a man. In the household also were Hannah's daughter, Isabella Brack (20) and her husband John Brack (23) from Byker, Northumberland, Coal miner deputy.

In 1901, Hannah Stone (70), widow, mother-in-law, from Wellington, Somerset, was living in the household of John Robert Brack (34) Coal deputy overman and Isabella Brack (30), who by this time had five children, at 10, New Rows, Washington, Great and Little Usworth, Chester Le Street, Durham.

Hannah Stone died, aged 78, in Chester Le Street, in 1909.

Tuesday, 12 January 2021

The Great Spy Peril: Enemy Aliens in Great Britain

Cathedral Road, Cardiff
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Robin Drayton - geograph.org.uk/p/1496808

Karl Kritzer (25), son of Wilhelm Kritzer and Flora Gleichauf, in 1901, was employed as butler to John P Ingledew, Solicitor, at 9 Cathederal Road, St John, Cardiff. There, in the 1st Quarter of 1905, an Anglicized, Charles Kritzer married Lilian Emily Jones, daughter of Samuel and Fanny Theresa Jones. 

Karl and Lilian's daughter, Flora Theresa Lillian Kritzer was born at the end of 1905 and, in 1911, was living with her grandparents in Gloucester, while her father was employed as butler to Henry Webb (Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Henry Webb, 1st Baronet), Liberal MP for the Forest of Dean, at 2 Seymour Street, St Marylebone, London, while her mother, Lady's Maid to Lady Webb, was at the Webb's country house at Llwynarthan, Castleton, Monmouthshire.

When I saw who Karl was working for in the run up to WWI, I knew there was going to be a story. By accident of his birth and the position of his employer, Karl found himself under scrutiny. Hardly surprising, but quite shocking. 

For context, it's important also to understand that Sunday newspaper, John Bull, was at that time a platform for Horatio Bottomley's "trenchant populist views" (read gammon: clearly reactionary and given to melodrama by the style of his writing), but it had estimated sales by August 1914 in excess of three quarters of a million copies a week. Bottomley was described as an English financier, journalist, editor, newspaper proprietor, swindler, and Member of Parliament. (When exposed, he was convicted, imprisoned and expelled from parliament.) Evidently, he judged others based on his own standards. 

Secondly, as to the actual level of threat from Espionage in 1914, it was shown to be predominantly paranoia and put down to Journalistic fantasy:
"An unprecedented 'spy mania' gripped Britain. Although 21 real German spies were arrested on 4 August, thousands of imaginary acts of espionage were reported to credulous police and military authorities." 
In an article published in John Bull on October 24th, 1914, Bottomley starts off by referring to German people as "Teutons", a word that has been used - and it feels this is the intent - as a derogatory term. Mentioning Karl Kritzer by name, Bottomley tries to make something out of the observations - of him merely going about his duties - and imaginings of a cook, the so-called Mrs Stacey (having researched, I find she is single and strongly suspect that 'elevating' her status to that of a married woman was an attempt to make her seem a more reliable witness), who opines that "Kritzer was always an objectionable person." (Probably nowhere near as objectionable to someone less bigoted.) Bottomley calls her "loyal and patriotic", while referring to Karl Kritzer as "a traitor to her King and country" and "one of the Kaiser's blood". He offers no evidence for these accusations. It's not every day one's relatives are mentioned in the same breath as then Prime Minister, Herbert Henry Asquith; Home Secretary, Reginald McKennaPrince Louis of BattenbergWilhelm II, German Emperor and the House of Hohenzollern, though for all the wrong reasons. 


They have no evidence, of course, but also attempt to make an issue of Karl returning to Germany shortly before the war. The records show that Karl's father was born in 1844, which would make him 70 in 1914. An entirely plausible age then for the man to be ill or dying. It's a particularly low blow.

Another article in The Strathearn Herald, published on the very same date, October 24, 1914 - which frankly reads like Bottomley wrote it himself - praises the John Bull and Bottomley for doing "a national service in calling attention to the spy peril in our midst" and goes further, saying "Karl Kritzer, in the employment of Mr Webb, a member of His Majesty's Government, may not be a spy; neither may the humblest German barber: but there is just this - they are both alien enemies, and as such a danger to the country ..." Evidence?

We learn quite a bit about Karl Kritzer from a follow-up article in the Western Mail, on Friday October 30, 1914, where Harry Webb, MP, is given the opportunity of responding. Apparently, Karl had been in his employ since 1908 and it confirms many of the details that I have also been able to research, such as Karl's naturalisation, Certificate A21115 issued 18 October 1911, which was signed by then Home Secretary, W. S. Churchill (I have a copy). Webb's manner of defending Karl Kritizer, does indeed seem to me to be the behaviour that a "decent, honourable man ought to pursue towards his servant."

Despite all this, we know Karl kept his job long after the end of the hostilities, because the following appeared in the Western Mail of 8 January 1921:
LLWYNARTHAN STAFF DANCE
After a lapse of six years, occasioned by the war, the annual staff dance at Llwynarthan, Castleton, Cardiff, the residence of Col. Sir Henry and Lady Webb, was revived on Thursday evening. The ball-room and smoke-rooms, originally a part of the old farmhouse, were converted into hospital wards during the war, and since being vacated by the patients, several alterations have been carried out. A happy party, numbering between 60 and 70, were entertained. Sir Henry and Lady Webb, and the members of the house party, did everything in their power to ensure the success of the function. Supper was laid in the dining-room, and after mutual expressions of esteem and goodwill, Sir Henry and Lady Webb left the staff and their friends at about midnight to their own devices. Thanks to the very admirable arrangements made by Mrs. Wynn and Mr. Charles Kritzer, a thoroughly happy and enjoyable time was spent.

Now who's the loyal servant, eh?  

The indexes of the 1921 Census show Charles Kritzer and Lillian Kritzer, both in Monmouthshire, where they'll still be in the employ of Sir Henry Webb.

Their daughter, Flora Kritzer (b. 1905) and Molly Kritzer (b. 1906), who must be Karl's brother, Joseph's daughter, Mary Amalie Kritzer, in 1921, are both listed in Totteridge, Barnet, Middlesex. Then aged 16 and 15, respectively, I imagine that the cousins are at a boarding school together, probably this one.

Flora T L Kritzer married a William B Connors, in Cardiff, in 1929. It appears they had one child, in 1939. Karl Kritzer had died in 1933, in Faversham, Kent, aged 57 and on 6 Feb 1935, Lillian Emily Kritzer departed Southampton for New York, aboard the RMS Berengaria (formerly SS Imperator) The first Cunard "Queen". The trip appears just to have been a holiday / visit. Lillian, then employed as a barmaid, was living at 20 Effingham Street, Belgravia in 1939. Retired, Lilian Emily Kritzer of 2 Cross Roads, Holywell, Wales, died, aged 75, and was buried on 13 Mar 1962 in Bagillt, Flintshire, Wales.

These pages are notes on work in progress, so expect changes as further research is done. Follow That Page can monitor changes.