Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label China. Show all posts
Showing posts with label China. Show all posts

Monday 15 April 2024

Arthur Edward Copeland and Alice Jane Hurry

All Saints, Shooters Hill, Plumstead, London SE18 - West end
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Salmon - geograph.org.uk/p/1955513

Arthur Edward Copeland (b. 19 Aug 1870 in Woolwich), son of Benjamin Copeland and Tamar Hockley, married Alice Jane Hurry (b. 1871 D Quarter in DEPWADE Volume 04B Page 223), daughter of Samuel Hurry and Jane Moyes, at All Saints Church, Plumstead, on 25 Dec 1894

Alice was the younger sister of Mary Ann Hurry, second wife of Tamar's younger brother, Daniel Hockley, who he'd married in 1891. 

Arthur Edward and Alice Jane Copeland had two children:
  1. George Arthur Copeland b. 21 Aug 1896 (1896 S Quarter in WOOLWICH Volume 01D Page 1270), bap. 9 Sep 1896 at St George's Garrison Church, Woolwich
  2. Edith Eleanor Copeland b. 1897 D Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 218, bap. 31 Oct 1897 at Plymouth, Crabtree Mission Church, when they were resident at 4 Gordon Terrace, Laira, Plymouth.
In 1901, Alice J Copeland (29) Daughter-in-law from Norfolk, England; George A Copeland (4) Grandson and Edith E Copeland (3) Granddaughter, were living with Arthur's parents, at 27, Llanover Road, Plumstead.

Arthur Edward Copeland joined the Royal Artillery, at 16, on 19 Nov 1886, in Woolwich. He was then 5ft 6in with a pale complexion, grey eyes and red hair. He was promoted to Bombardier on 1 Mar 1896; Corporal on 23 Oct 1897; reengaged to complete 21 years service on 15 Dec 1897; and promoted to Sergeant on 24 Oct 1899. He served in South Africa and China, but died at Hong Kong Station Hospital on 18 Aug 1901, of Heat Stroke, aged 30.

In 1903, Alice Copeland married Thomas Hurry back in Depwade, Norfolk. 

One could guess that they were cousins and records confirm this: Thomas Hurry (b. 1856 D Quarter in HARTISMERE Volume 04A Page 455) was the son of Barzillai Hurry and Ann Beales. Barzillai Hurry (bap. 13 Dec 1820) and Alice's father, Samuel Hurry (bap. 21 Jul 1831), were brothers, both sons of John Hurry and Susannah Elizabeth Diggens. (Their mother, Susan Hurry, was sentenced to 14 years transportation in 1836 and died in Australia.)

On 14 Feb 1878, Thomas Hurry, barman, enlisted for General Service Infantry. He served in Nova Scotia, Gibraltar and South Africa, transferring to the Army Reserve on 12 Apr 1884. At the completion of his 12 years service in 1890, he was 5ft 7in with a dark complexion, brown eyes and black hair.

Thomas Hurry was a widower when he married his cousin Alice, having first married Charlotte Francis (14 years his senior, born 1842), daughter of William Francis and Sarah Basham, at All Saints, Dickleburgh, on 15 May 1884. Charlotte Hurry died at 58 and was buried on 23 Mar 1899.

Thomas and Alice Hurry had two further children:
  1. Ellen Hurry b. 1903 J Quarter in DEPWADE Volume 04B Page 238, bap. 11 Jun 1903 in Dickleburgh with Langmere, Norfolk
  2. Samuel Jack Hurry b. 2 Aug 1906 (S Quarter in DEPWADE Volume 04B Page 218), bap. 5 Sep 1906 in Dickleburgh with Langmere 
In 1911, Thomas Hurry (52) Gardener was living at Dickleburgh Scole, Dickleburgh, Norfolk, with Alice Hurry (39), Ellen Hurry (7), Jack Hurry (4), George Copeland (14) Stepson; Edith Copeland (13) step-daughter and Jane Hurry (78) Widow (Alice's mother).

Alice Jane Hurry died at 42 in 1913 D Qtr in NORWICH Vol 04B Page 185.

In 1921, Thomas Hurry (62) Jobbing Gardner was living in Dickleburgh, Norfolk with Jack Hurry (14) Labourer and Ellen Hurry (17) Household Duties. There was a George Copeland (23) Bombardier, Royal Field Artillery at 30, Thomas Street, Woolwich (although his birthplace is listed as Kings Lynn, Norfolk); not located Edith Eleanor Copeland again anywhere.

Thomas Hurry died, at 79, in 1936 M Quarter in DEPWADE Volume 04B Page 311 and was buried in 26 Feb 1936, in Dickleburgh with Langmere.

Ellen Hurry died at 43 in 1946 J Quarter in DEPWADE Vol 04B Page 211.

Samuel Jack Hurry married Helen Joan Goodwin (b. 15 Dec 1908), daughter of James Goodwin, Licenced Victualler of the Kings Head Inn, Brockdish, Scole and Harriet Welton, in Depwade, Norfolk, in 1934. They had two children, in 1935 and 1944. In 1939, Jack was a Licensee and Farmer in Rushall, Dickleburgh, Depwade. Jack Samuel Hurry died, in Rushall, on 9 May 1962; Helen Joan Hurry died on 3 May 2006 in Waveney, Suffolk.

Monday 23 October 2023

Thomas Back (Thomas Drake) and Elizabeth Mary Horn

Plymouth: Morice Square
cc-by-sa/2.0- © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/688016

Thomas Back, son of Thomas Back and Mary Drake married Elizabeth Mary Horn (b. 1859 in Okehampton, Devon), daughter of James Horn and Elizabeth Bolt, on 23 Oct 1884 at St Paul's Church, Devonport. (The Anglican Church of Saint Paul the Apostle was situated on the east side of Morice Square.)

Born Thomas Drake (1850 D Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 09 Page 429), as he was named Thomas, it did seem likely that he was the son of Thomas Back, who his mother married two years later. He started life in Stoke Damerel Workhouse, where he was in 1851 with his mother and his older (half) siblings, Mary and George. He was subsequently known as Thomas Back and on his marriage certificate in 1884, as Thomas Back, Stoker RN, lists his address as 40, Cannon Street, Devonport - the very same address where we find both his parents and his sister in 1881, so we can be sure it's him - and names his father as Thomas Back, Labourer. Of course, this could simply be because that was the man who was around as he was growing up, but actually being named after him at birth, seems to confirm what we're being told.

Thomas Back, DOB 15 Oct 1850 (agrees with the quarter of his birth registration), enlisted in the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class in July 1865, volunteering at HMS Implacable (1805) - former Duguay-Trouin, turned training ship (exactly the same ship, on exactly the same day as my great-grandfather, David Jones). Thomas Back's naval career does not appear to progress at this point, there being no entries beyond enlistment. 

There is then a record of a Thomas Back from Devonport, with date of birth given as 14 Oct 1849 (one year and one day of difference and this time the year does NOT agree with his birth registration), but we know this is our man from other records (marriage, census), who joined the Royal Navy on 9 Jan 1873 and served for 21 years, until 27 Apr 1894. He began as a Stoker 2nd Class, moved up to Stoker, Leading Stoker and Leading Stoker 1st Class.

Both naval records list Thomas as having Black hair and Hazel eyes. He was 4 ft 10 in at 14 and grew to 5 ft 6 in as an adult, gaining a bunch of tattoos.

From May 1873 to Aug 1875, Thomas was with HMS Agincourt (1865) at Portland, Dorset and, during that time, spent 28 days in Dorchester Gaol (HM Prison Dorchester) - Pure Victorian detention in all it’s glory.

At the time of the census of 1881, Thomas Back (30) Stoker, was moored in Hong Kong aboard HMS Victor Emmanuel (1855), which ship he was assigned to from Jun 1880 to Jan 1882, Feb 1882 to Jan 1883 and again from Feb to Apr 1883 (transferring to HMS Pegasus (1878) for the month in 1882, also in China and HMS Albatross (1873) in Jan 1883).

Two days before his marriage, Thomas joined HMS Tamar (1863), commissioned at Devonport on 21 Oct 1884 and then, from 15 Jan 1885 until 22 Jan 1889, was with HMS Nelson (1876). She sailed for the Australia Station after commissioning and became the flagship there in 1885. She was in Sydney and Brisbane and at the Woolloomooloo Bay Regatta on 18 Apr 1885, remaining on station until returning home in January 1889.

Thomas and Elizabeth's only child was born later that year:

  1. Lilian Mary Back b. 4 Nov 1889 D Q in STOKE DAMEREL 05B 340
Thomas spent time with HMS Magicienne (1888) in Portsmouth in 1890; HMS Goshawk (1872) took him to Gibraltar from May 1890 to Jun 1892 and while he was away, Elizabeth M Back (31) Wife Of A Stoker RN and Lilian M Back (1) were living in St Levan Road, Devonport. Thomas finished his career, from Dec 1892 to Apr 1894, at HMS Vivid II, the Stokers and Engine Room Artificers School in Devonport, before being pensioned.

In 1901, Thomas Back (50) Naval Pensioner was living in Avondale Terrace, Devonport with wife, Elizabeth M Back (41), daughter, Lilian M Back (11) and John Cornhill (29) General Labourer from Ireland, Boarder.

Thomas Back died in 1906 D Quarter in DEVONPORT Volume 05B Page 220. His age was estimated as 58 (he was 56), gaining yet another year on top of the one he added the second time he enlisted in the Navy.

In 1911, Elizabeth Back (51) Widow from Okehampton, Devonshire, was living in East Stonehouse. Living with her were recently married, son-in-law and daughter, Charles and Lilian Renshaw.

In 1921, Elizabeth Mary Back was still living with Charles and Lilian Renshaw (and their two daughters), at 7 Duckworth Street, Devonport.

Elizabeth Mary Back died, at 66, in 1926 M Quarter in DEVONPORT.

Thursday 30 December 2021

Thomas Jones' Expedition to China 1841-1843

The Port of Santa Cruz de Tenerife before 1900

One-hundred-and-eighty years ago, on 30 Dec 1841, three troop ships, the Belleisle, Apollo and Sapphire, of this Britsh naval expeditionary force, put into the Port of Santa Cruz de Tenerife. They'd left Plymouth Sound on 20 Dec 1841, bound for China, during the First Opium War (or First China War).

The Canary Islands, whose strategic position in the Atlantic, between Europe, Africa and America, then made it a mandatory refuelling stop for ships.

After only just over a month, from 14 Oct 1841 to 21 Nov 1841, aboard HMS Caledonia (1808) - a 120-gun first-rate ship of the line - my 2x-great-grandfather Thomas Jones, had joined the 74-gun third-rate ship HMS Belleisle (1819), in Plymouth, on 22 Nov 1841, as an Able Seaman, but was assigned as Captain's Guard, on 4 Sep 1842, presumably somewhere up the Yangtze, as this was ten days before the force began to withdraw from the area. 

The captain of the Belleisle at that time, who they will have been guarding, was John Kingcome (Admiral Sir John Kingcombe - 1794-1871).

On 18 Nov 1841, the Belleisle had been in Plymouth, being fitted out for sea, and as a troop ship. Two days later, Lieutenants George Winsor. D. Ferguson, J. Risk, and Philip De Saumarez, were appointed. On 28 Nov 1841, they went out to Plymouth Sound. A company of artillery brought to Plymouth by the steamer Alban, embarked on 5 Dec 1841, and the 98th was reported to be embarking shortly. On 7 Dec 1841, the ship's company was paid advance of wages, which will have been useful on their first stop off en route if they were allowed off the ship to enjoy the sights. How many will have availed themselves of the services of the the notorious dock-women of Tenerife, I cannot possibly surmise.

1 Jan 1842 [Belleisle] is reported to have been at Santa Cruz for the last 2 days, with the troop ships Apollo and Sapphire, and schooner Wanderer. The Belleisle arrived Teneriffe (sic) [...] where the officer commanding of the troops, at the request of the locals, allowed the band of the 98th Regt to go on shore and play on the Mole, where comparison was made to Nelson's welcome some 40 years previously, and his unsuccessful attack. The ships took the opportunity to top up with water and fresh provisions, with prices reflecting the demand for 2,500 men on board the ships.

The ships left Tenerife on New Year's Day and continued their voyage. On 2 Feb 1842 the Belleisle, Apollo and Sapphire arrived Rio de Janeiro en route for China with reinforcements. They were there until 28 Feb 1842, when she departed Rio de Janeiro in company with her consorts, for China. On 14 Mar 1842 she arrived at the Cape of Good Hope, in company with the troop ships Sapphire and Apollo and departed for China on 22 Mar 1842. It took them until 2 Jun 1842 before they arrived in Hong Kong, from England, with part of the 98th Regt. On 5 Jul 1842 they were stationed at Chusan (Zhoushan). And from 16 Jun - 29 Aug 1842, made their expedition up the Yang-tse-Keang, to the end of hostilities and signing of the Treaty of Nanking. Following the signing of the Treaty, the force began its withdrawal on 14 Sep 1842; by 6 Oct 1842, the expeditionary force had completely withdrawn from the Yangtze River
"Shanghai was evacuated on June 23rd, and the troops and vessels fell back to Woosung. The expedition into the Yangtsekiang proper was then promptly organised. The European  troops which took part in it were the 18th, 26th, 49th, 55th, and 98th Regiments, with some Royal Artillery and Engineers, the whole being under Sir Hugh Gough, Major-Generals Lord Saltoun, Schoedde, and Bartley, Colonel Montgomerie, R.A., and Captain  Pears, R.E. Besides about forty transports, the following vessels of the Royal Navy and H.E.I. Co.'s marine participated :— H.M.S. Cornwallis, Blonde, Calliope, North Star, Dido, Modextc, Endymion, Clio, Columbine, Ahjerinc, Bellisle (sic), Apollo, Sapphire, Jupiter, Rattlesnake, Plover, Starling, and Vixen, paddle. H.E.I. Co.'s Sesostris, Auckland, Queen, Tenasserim, Nemesis, Phlegethon, Pluto, Proserpine, and Medusa — all paddle steamers. North Star, Modeste, Clio, and Columbine."
HMS Belleisle later as a Hospital Ship in the Crimean War Edwin Weedon, CC BY 4.0
HMS Belleisle, a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 26 April 1819 at Pembroke Dockyard, was converted to serve as a troopship in 1841.

The Captain’s Guard

"In addition to their combat role, Marines also acted as a vaccine of sorts against the infection most feared by ship’s captains: mutiny. Armed with muskets and bayonets, they served as the captain’s personal guard and moved quickly to quell any hint of insurrection on the lower decks. It certainly was not lost on sailors that Marines were billeted between the sailors and the captain’s quarters. Fully armed sentries were posted at key points around ships, including captains’ cabins, powder magazines and spirit lockers. In battle, Marine sentries stood guard at the entrance to the companionways to prevent any less-than-stalwart sailors fleeing to the relative safety of the lower decks." 

It's interesting that Thomas was in a role that was more normally carried out by the Marines. We did wonder if this was because there were no Marines on this troop ship, however, Thomas was also part of the captain's guard on his next two ships, before he then joined the Coastguard service.

Thomas Jones remained as Captain's Guard on HMS Belleisle until 28 Sep 1843. He went back to HMS Caledonia, then under the command of Captain Alexander Milne (Admiral of the Fleet Sir Alexander Milne, 1st Baronet), again as Captain’s Guard, on 29 Sep 1843, in which capacity he was still serving at the time of his marriage to my 2x great-grandmother, Mary Harty, on 7 Jan 1844.