Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Penfold. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Penfold. Show all posts

Friday, 8 April 2022

Arthur Edward Penfold - The Liverpool Cab Murder

Medlock Hotel Rumney Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Sue Adair - geograph.org.uk/p/6521990
Late 19th century public house built adjacent to Kirkdale Gaol which was built in 1818 and demolished in 1897. This land became Kirkdale Recreation Ground but hid a gruesome past.



Arthur Edward Penfold (b. 1859), son of William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn and brother of John Robert PenfoldFrederick William Penfold and Charles Penfold, was found guilty of the murder of an "unfortunate" (prostitute) Margaret Stewart alias Isabella Cowie [1] on 17 Dec 1890 in Liverpool, at Liverpool Assizes on 7 Mar 1891 and sentenced to death.

At the time of the census in 1891, Arthur Edward Penfold (31), Grocer's porter, Single, born in Hartfield, Sussex, was listed as a Prisoner at Her Majesty's Prison Kirkdale Liverpool, a.k.a. the Kirkdale House of Correction. "Prisoners had to work, and the treadmill (Penal treadmill) used for grinding corn was the largest in the country, needing the efforts of 130 prisoners a day to keep it running." Kirkdale had one of the highest death rates in the country for a prison.

What brought him there was, unsurprisingly, widely reported in the press, but to summarise: Penfold had apparently been consorting with this woman, described as being "an inmate of a disorderly house", for five or six days before the date of the murder and, on the day in question, they'd gone out together. A witness said they were sober when they left in the afternoon. At 7:30pm they had got a cab together and Penfold had asked the driver for Lambert Street. 

Upon arrival, Penfold told the cab driver that he had stabbed the woman and told him to call a policeman. The woman was taken to the Infirmary, but died shortly from the six stab wounds that had penetrated both her heart and liver.

The Indictment reads: "At Liverpool on the 17th December 1890, feloniously, wilfully, and of malice aforethought, did kill and murder one Margaret Stewart alias Isabella Cowie." Penfold was tried before The Honourable Sir John C Day, Knight (Sir John Charles Frederick Sigismund Day of whom it was writ, "The readiness with which he resorted to the severest punishments, including lashes, earned him a fearsome reputation and the nickname 'Judgment Day'.")

A later report relates that, "On one occasion when visiting the unfortunate man at Kirkdale, I asked him, "How come you to do it? Did you not know what you were about?" He said he didn't know why he did it or when, or even where it was done, his memory entirely left him: but he knew as soon as the fateful act was committed what he had done, and he could not forgive himself."

From the Liverpool Mercury Tuesday, 23 Dec 1890

THE TERRIBLE CAB TRAGEDY - PENFOLD'S ANTECEDENTS
Inquiries yesterday resulted in little further information as to the identification of the murdered woman Stewart or Cowie. A considerable number of people have viewed her body, some of them have known her during the period of her life spent in Liverpool. Up till a late hour last evening she had not been identified, and her parentage and place of birth still remain a mystery. It is believed, however, that she was formerly resident in Glasgow or Edinburgh. As to her Liverpool life, it appears that until about five weeks ago the deceased woman was at a house of ill-fame in a court off Lambert Street. 
The following are the antecedents of Arthur Edward Penfold, the full and correct name of the accused, which form quite a melancholy story. He was the son of a tollgate keeper, and was born in Hartfield, a pretty rural village on the borders of the Ashdown Forest, in the north of Sussex. His parents are long since dead. He served in the 5th Lancers, and was invalided out of the service with heart disease and afterwards joined the Sussex Artillery Militia under the name of Peter Bright. He appears to have won the good opinion of everyone with whom he came in contact, but was liable to give way to drink, and when he had only a small quantity he was "like a madman." Generally a teetotaller, he appears to have periodically broken out, and then he would leave his situation, however profitable it was, and, without warning, go away, often turning up in a most deplorable state of destitution.  
Writing to his brother from Norwich Union Infirmary in 1888 [2], after speaking of his misery, the letter reads: "Sad to lead a life like this, you cannot wonder at my being laid up. What a fool I must be to do it when I might be settled down and comfortable. What a poor, weak-minded fool for yielding so easy to temptation. I feel as if there is no hope for me; it seems no use praying: there is no God to hear my prayer. I have sinned away my day of grace and must now take my chances. Oh that I had never left the proper path. It is too late for me now. I am glad you are all right, dear brother. Keep to that path and don't yield one inch to the devil, or he will surely soon be your master." 
He returned to East Grinstead after that, and his old master, hearing that he was again in the town, sent for him, and without asking any questions as to his career during his long absence at once installed him into the old place of grocer's and draper's porter. Several month ago he had another outbreak, and not returning with a horse and van to his employer's shop, information was given to the police. Penfold was discovered drugged and insensible on Tunbridge Wells Common, and the horse and van on another part of the common not under control. He then admitted that he had given way to drink and to immoral women, with whom he generally got associated after taking even a moderate amount of liquor. He was brought up at the East Grinstead Police Court, and the charge was withdrawn, and strange to say, there were two former employers whom he had in his freaks forsaken waiting to offer him a situation, even, as one of them said, "if Penfold had done a couple of months' imprisonment," He went back into the employment of the of the draper and grocer, however, and went on properly until a fortnight ago, when he was sent to Horley with the horse and van. The morning was bitterly cold, and it was snowing fast, and there is no doubt that Penfold indulged in a little intoxicant to warm him. As usual, it got over him, and when he put up the horse and cart at Horley, after collecting an amount of £18, he went off and was not heard of until his name was identified by the East Grinstead police in connection with the Liverpool tragedy. He was then "wanted" for stealing the £18 alluded to. It may be interesting to state that though such a trustworthy employee when he kept to his temperance pledge, he occasionally complained of pains in the head, and was sometimes strange in his manner. It seems also that his grandmother was subject to epilepsy, and his mother died in an epileptic fit.

In 1884, Penfold had been before the Magistrates on the charge of attempted suicide - dropped on the grounds of insanity. In fact, he had attempted to take his own life on two occasions, once he had gone onto London Bridge with the intention of jumping into the river, the other time he put poison in his coffee. 

Nor were those even Penfold's only brushes with the law, as noted on the record of the murder trial is a previous incarceration for 14 days at HM Prison, Lewes, having been found guilty at Brighton Petty Sessions, on 31 May 1886, of being drunk and assaulting a P.C., that time going under the name of Arthur Carter

At the trial, "Dr James Morton, of Chelsea, deposed that he had known the prisoner's mother, brothers and other relatives for many years. [He had said that] they were all characterised by a tendency to nervous disease. The mother died at the age of 55 during a violent epileptic seizure. Witness knew two brothers of the prisoner. One showed great mental instability, and the slightest excitement, either from joy or grief, rendered him almost incomprehensible. That brother's child two years ago had attacks of epilepsy. Prisoner's elder brother had five children, and three witness had seen during epileptic attacks." 

Another witness said, "... he has relatives who are idiots." "One of the prisoner's female cousins is an idiot, but not bad enough to be locked up." 

Charles Penfold, the prisoner's younger brother recounted that the prisoner had disappeared from his employment suddenly in 1879, which was when he's joined the 5th Lancers, and that "If he took drink he very soon became irresponsible."

Frederick William Penfold, of her Majesty's navy at Portsmouth, spoke of having frequently noticed peculiarities about [the] prisoner. He stated that he had not seen the prisoner for over seven years.

The jury, without leaving the box, found Penfold guilty of murder and the sentence of the court was that he was to be hanged. 

A petition was got up with a plea of insanity against the death sentence.

Ian Waugh of Murder Research provided one of the last pieces of the puzzle through an item from The Liverpool Mercury of Friday, 27 Mar 1891: 
THE CONVICT PENFOLD: The Governor of Kirkdale Jail received the official document from the Home Office yesterday morning, announcing the respite of Arthur Edward Penfold, who was, at the recent assizes, found guilty of wilful murder. This decision of the Home Secretary was not only received with joy by Penfold himself, but by his brothers and others who, since the trial, have been indefatigable in their exertions to save the unfortunate man from the gallows.
Respite is not the same as commuting his sentence, it merely put it off.

Kirkdale Gaol was demolished in 1897, which is probably the reason Penfold was moved and he ended up at HM Prison Parkhurst, on the Isle of Wight. Parkhurst was subject to fierce criticism by the public, politicians and in the press for its harsh regime (including the use of leg irons initially). Obviously related to this move, was that his brother, Frederick William Penfold, relocated to the Isle of Wight in 1898. In the end his death sentence was never carried out, however, as Arthur Edward Penfold, Convict, died aged 41, at Parkhurst Prison, on 21 May 1900, from Peritonitis. There is reference on the death certificate of an inquest having been held on 23 May 1900. 

  1. One of the witnesses at the inquest had said that she'd seen a letter from the victim's mother, addressed to Margaret Cowie, so this may have been her real name. Searches reveal that death certificates have been issued in all three names: Margaret Stewart, Isabella Cowie and Margaret Cowie, all with year of birth calculated to 1867 from her supposed age of 23.
  2. Records show Arthur Penfold being admitted to, on 21 Jan 1888, and discharged from, on 11 Feb 1888, St Andrew's Workhouse, Norwich.
My link to this murderer: his brother, Frederick William Penfold, married Harriet Mary Tubb, the half-sister of Elizabeth Tubb, who married a blood relative, 1st Cousin 4x removedStephen Botterill. (Botterill's mother, Mary Thompson, a 3x great-grand aunt, was the sister of a 3x great-grandfather, Daniel Thompson.) Stephen Botterill, ironically, was a Police Constable.

Wednesday, 6 April 2022

Frederick William Penfold and Harriet Mary Tubb

Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda SeanMD80 (talk) (Uploads), CC BY-SA 3.0

Frederick William Penfold (b. 20 Jul 1863) in Hartfield, Sussex, son of William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn (m. 1851), married Harriet Mary Tubb, daughter of Edward Tubb and Sarah Elizabeth Joy - sister of Herbert Joy Tubb and half-sister of Elizabeth Tubb and Susan Alice Tubb - in Edmonton, north London (why that area is unclear), in the second quarter of 1888.

Frederick and Harriet had five children: 

  1. Harriet Mary Penfold Tubb b. 1884 Q4 in CHELSEA Vol 01A Page 338
  2. George Edward Penfold b. 7 Mar 1889 in SHEPPEY Vol 02A Page 892
  3. Grace Joy Penfold b. 27 Aug 1892 in DOVER Volume 02A Page 982
  4. Frederick William Penfold b. 8 Oct 1896 in FULHAM Vol 01A Page 305
  5. Bert Penfold b. 14 Aug 1898 in ISLE OF WIGHT Vol 02B Page 599
Looking at this succession of birth locations: i. Frederick's mother, Mary Ann Penfold (55) died in in Chelsea, in 1886, so it may well have been to her that Harriet had gone. Frederick's elder brother, John Robert Penfold, Boot Maker, was certainly in Chelsea by 1891; ii. Sheppey makes sense that Harriet was able to return to her own mother for the birth of her first legitimate child; iii. this is the year after Frederick left the navy, so unsure why Dover (Harriet's mother's family, perhaps); iv. Fulham is where Frederick's younger brother Charles lived by 1897 and makes sense to go to his family for this birth, her own mother having died in 1895 and v. the Isle of Wight is where they'd moved in 1898.

Frederick William Penfold (106687), had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1878, at 15, as a Boy 2nd Class. His father had died in 1873, which may well have been motivation for going to sea. At that time he was 5ft tall, had dark brown hair, brown eyes and fair skin. He'd previously found work as a Gardener. Later, he grew to the lofty height of 5ft 5in and his complexion became ruddy. On 20 Jul 1881, his 18th birthday, Frederick signed up for a further period of 10 years.

Frederick William Penfold's Naval Career:

In 1881, Frederick William Penfold (18), Signal boy from Hartfield, Sussex, was listed under Royal Navy At Sea, Ships and Overseas Establishments with HMS Northampton, in Camber, Bermuda (Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda)

  • 16 Dec 1882 - 2 Apr 1884 - HMS Duncan (1859) which had been flag ship at Sheerness since 1879. (Exactly the right time and place for Frederick to meet Harriet, who was born and lived in Sheerness. Harriet's father, Edward Tubb, died in Jan 1884. We might conclude therefore that Harriet, then 16, sought solace in Frederick.)
  • 3 Apr 1884 - 30 Jun 1886HMS Carysfort (1878), which in 1884 and 1885, landed men for the naval brigade at Sudan (during the Mahdist War, which claimed the life of Gordon of Khartoum). During this time, there is a note on Frederick's service record saying "Mily Gaol Alexandria 42 days" (Gabbari military prison, Alexandria, Egypt). Doesn't give the exact dates or what for, but 42 days is unlikely to be too serious. Drunk maybe? Apr 1886 Mediterranean. 8 May 1886 Serving in Greek Waters. 19 Jun 1886 Malta.

Crossing Malta's Grand Harbour by Water Taxi


In 1891, Frederick W Penfold (27), Qualified signalman, married, is a 'Member of crew' of HMS Excellent in Portsmouth Harbour. Harriet Mary Penfold (26), Harriet M Penfold (6) and George E Penfold (2) were visiting Harriet's widowed mother, Sarah E Tubb (61) at her lodgings in Trinity Road, Minster in Sheppey.

In 1898, George Edward Penfold, son of Frederick William Penfold, Commercial Agent, of 22 West Street, Newport, was enrolled at the Newport Board School in Newport, Isle of Wight. His previous school was Board School Southsea.

But the next record we find, is on 22 Sep 1899, when George Penfold, aged 9, from Barnardo Homes, sails to Toronto, Canada on the vessel Arawa. "According to the Barnardo records [Grace Joy] was admitted to the Barnardo's Homes in England on July 22, 1899 at the age of 7 with her brother George." [Source]

In 1901, Harriet M Penfold (32) still listed as married, was at 49, Trafalgar Road, Newport, Isle of Wight, with Frederick W Penfold (4). George E Penfold, in 1901, then 12, was listed as a Domestic in the household of a David White from Scotland, in Assiniboia EastNorthwest Territories, Canada. 

Frederick William Penfold, then a house painter (journeyman) of 2 Seagrave Rd, Fulham, died, aged 37, on 7 Apr 1901, of a cerebral hemorrhage (stroke) in Fulham Infirmary. His elder brother, John Robert Penfold of 52, Hogarth Buildings, Westminster is listed as the informant and was in attendance.

We read here that, "According to family hearsay Fredrick left the family at some stage prior to his death and Harriett could not keep the family together and it seems that her son George was put into a Barnardo’s Home and sent to Canada in 1899 at the age of 10." And, sadly, the trail of records does bear this out.

On 31 July 1904, G J Penfold (11) Female (Grace Joy) from Barnardo Homes sailed to Toronto, Canada on the vessel RMS Southwark.

Then on 3 May 1907, the youngest, Bert Penfold (8) from Barnardo Homes sailed to Toronto, Canada on the vessel SS Dominion.

So it wasn't just George who was sent to Barnardo Homes, but three of the children: George, Grace and Bert, who became Home Children sent to Canada: "​From the late 1860s right up to 1948, over 100,000 children of all ages were emigrated right across Canada, from the United Kingdom, to be used as indentured farm workers and domestics. Believed by Canadians to be orphans, only approximately 12 percent truly were". "For the most part, these children were not picked up from the streets but came from intact families, who, through sickness or even death of one of their parents, had fallen on hard times."

In Oct 1910, Harriet Mary Penfold (40) Domestic and Frederick William Penfold (13) at School, make their way to Quebec, Canada (and apparently on to Bracebridge, Ontario) on the vessel Lake Manitoba, travelling steerage from Liverpool. Next to Harriet's name is the stamp, British Bonus Allowed, which was was a commission paid by the Canadian government's Immigration Branch to steamship booking agents (not to the immigrants themselves).

In 1911, Fred Penfold (listed as born 1897, but immigration year 1910) was in Guelph, Wellington South, Ontario, Canada in a household with two English ladies: Letia Camocott (b. 1865) and Alice Merridon (b. 1873) Lodger. It doesn't say in what capacity, but as he would then be 15, presumably Fred was either working for them or elsewhere and boarding there. Meanwhile Bert Penfold (12) that year was a Boarder in the household of Canadian couple, George Gilbert (b. 1873) and his wife, Etta, in Muskoka, Ontario, Canada.

All three boys: George Edward, Frederick William Jr and Bert, it seems served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, during World War I.

Grace Penfold (23) married Benjamin Folie (24), son of George Folie, on 10 Aug 1914 in Toronto, Canada. On the marriage record however, in the space where her parents names should be, it has 'unknown' written across the space, so I think we have to assume that her mother had not reencountered her.

In 1916, H M Penfold (48) Female (Harriet Mary) - immigration year 1910 - was in the household of Englishman, Charles M C Westaway (32) in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, seemingly employed as Housekeeper.  

Harriet Mary Penfold (née Tubb) died, aged 67, on 27 Aug 1934 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada and is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon.


Their name liveth forever

Walter Ward and Harriet Mary Penfold

Chiswick High Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/6619235

Harriet Mary Penfold Tubb, as she was registered upon her birth in 1884, daughter of Frederick William Penfold and Harriet Mary Tubb, it is reported, "...  did not go to Canada [as her siblings did] as she was 15 years old and had gone into service." And indeed, in 1901, we find Harriet M Penfold (16), as a General domestic servant in the employ of Joseph Wain (41) Draper and shopkeeper at 288, High Road, Chiswick, Middlesex. 

(Harriet's late paternal grandmother, Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn, was originally from Chiswick, so perhaps this had some bearing on the location?)

In 1903, we find Harriet in Hackney, for the birth of her first child. Then in the first quarter of 1906, Harriet, apparently known as Hetty, married Walter Ward, in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire. Unfortunately, it's been impossible to locate Walter on previous census returns, to be able to pinpoint where they coincided. We have to take it on trust that Gladys Grace is Walter's daughter, as she is later listed with the surname Ward, but there is no guarantee of this.

Walter and Harriet had at least seven children:
  1. Gladys Grace Penfold b. 1903 S Quarter in HACKNEY Vol 01B Page 539
  2. Walter Ernest Ward b. 1907 M Quarter in BRIDGEND Vol 11A Page 903
  3. William George Ward b. 1908 J Quarter in BRIDGEND Vol 11A Page 945
  4. Herbert Edward Ward b. 1910 J Quarter in BELPER Vol 07B Page 732
  5. Frederick John Ward b. 1912 M Quarter in BELPER Vol 07B Page 1346
  6. Alma Mary Ward b. 1914 M Qtr in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A 159, died age 6 in 1920 S Quarter in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A  Page 91 and buried on 17 Aug 1920 in Blackfordby, Leicestershire
  7. Mabel Joy Ward b. 10 Dec 1919 in ASHBY DE LA ZOUCH Vol 07A 162
Walter Ward, 32 in 1914, will have been of an age to have served during World War I and although it would be difficult to isolate his service record, I think the evidence for this is the gap in children between 1914 and 1919. 

In 1911, living at 24 Sleetmoor Lane, Somercotes, Derbyshire, were Walter Ward (29) 'Night repairer under ground', born in Costock, Nottinghamshire (there's a birth registered in Loughborough, in 1882, which may relate); Harriet Mary (26) born in Chelsea; William Ward (34) 'Coal contractor under ground', Brother, born in Clay Cross, Derbyshire; Gladys Grace Ward (7), Walter Ernest Ward (4) born Nantymoel, Wales, William George Ward (3), born Caerau, Bridgend and Herbert Edward Ward (1) born Swanwick, Derbyshire.

So far, I've been unable to identify further records for this family, except Mabel Joy, who married Douglas A Clayton in Mansfield, Nottingham in 1939 and reportedly died, in Guelph, Wellington South, Ontario, Canada, in 1998.

Tuesday, 5 April 2022

Charles Penfold and Mary Anna Tucker

View of St. Luke's and Christ Church Chelsea from Flood Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Robert Lamb - geograph.org.uk/p/4810123

Charles Penfold (b. 1865), son of William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn, married Mary Anna Tucker (bap. 29 Nov 1857 in Burlescombe, Devon), daughter of Robert Allen Tucker - an Innkeeper from North Curry, Somerset - and Mary Linton, at Christ Church, Chelsea in the last quarter of 1886.

Charles and Mary Anna had seven children:
  1. Thomas Edwin Penfold b. 1887 D Quarter in CHELSEA Vol 01A Page 327
  2. Rosalie Mary Penfold b. 24 Aug 1889 in CHELSEA Volume 01A Page 317
  3. Mary Anna Penfold b. 1892 M Qtr in EAST GRINSTEAD Vol 02B Page 136
  4. Josephine Grace Penfold b. 15 Sep 1893 in CUCKFIELD Vol 02B Page 159
  5. Minnie Gunn Penfold b. 1895 J Quarter in CUCKFIELD Vol 02B Page 157, died in 1896 J Quarter in LAMBETH Volume 01D Page 272
  6. Charles Edward Powell Penfold b. 4 Sep 1897 in FULHAM Vol 01A 260
  7. William Robert Penfold b. 1899 D Quarter in FULHAM Vol 01A Page 322
In 1891, Charles Penfold (25) Bootmaker and Mary A Penfold (31ish) were living in Glenvue Road, East Grinstead, Sussex with their first two children, Thomas E Penfold (3) and Rosalie M Penfold (1).

By 1901, living at 48, Hugon Road, Fulham, London: Charles R Penfold (35) Civil servant postman bootmaker, Mary A Penfold (41), Thomas E (13), Rosalie M (11), Mary A (9), Josephine G (7), Charles E P (3) and William R (1).

And in 1911, at 68 Perrymead Street, Fulham, London, were Charles Penfold (45) Civil service Post Office Worker, Mary Anna Penfold (51), Thomas Edwin (23) Civil service Post Office Worker; Rosalie Mary (21) Elementary teacher for Surrey County Council; Mary Anna (19) Bodice assistant Dressmaking; Josephine Grace (17), Charles Edwin Powell (13) and William Robert (11).

There was a death of a Mary A Penfold, aged 23, in Fulham, in the first quarter of 1915. Also in the first quarter of 1915, Josephine Grace Penfold married Douglas Gordon Reich (right, presumably with Josephine), who served in the Middlesex Regiment, Royal Engineers during the First World War, also in Fulham. And on 26 Apr 1915, Charles Edward Powell Penfold (19) enlisted in the County of London Yeomanry.

NB: I'm also certain that both Thomas Edwin Penfold and William Robert Penfold also served in the First World War, however there's more than one person with those names, so I've not been able to isolate the relevant records.

Charles Penfold died, aged 51, in 1917 in Wandsworth.

Mary A Penfold, b. 1858, was still living in Wandsworth in 1921.

Mary Penfold died, aged 71, in Battersea in 1930.

In 1939, Rosalie Mary was a Head Mistress, living at 38, Hillside, Banstead, Surrey with her brother-in-law, Douglas G Reich, School master, sister, Josephine G Reich and their children. Rosalie died, aged 68, in 1957, in St Austell, Cornwall; Douglas Reich of Glamis, Fore Street, Bugle, Cornwall, died on 23 Oct 1970. Josephine Grace Reich died in 1977 at St Lawrence's Hospital, Bodmin, a mental hospital, originally built as the Cornwall County Asylum.

Charles Edward Powell Penfold (known as Edward Penfold) had died, on 5 Oct 1970, in Perth, Western Australia.

John Robert Penfold and Mary Jane Wilmshurst

Millbank Estate, Erasmus Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/2294495
Looking down St Oswulf Street towards Hogarth House, built in 1897-99 by R. Minton Taylor. Grade II* listed. The Millbank Estate was one of the earliest and highest quality public housing projects of the London County Council, built in 1897-1902. The style is Arts and Crafts with touches of Queen Anne, red brick, neat white-painted windows, shaped gables.

John Robert Penfold (b. 1857), son of William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn, married Mary Jane Wilmshurst (b. 1856), daughter of James Wilmshurst a farmer of 26 acres in Heathfield, Hailsham, Sussex and Sarah Prior, in 1878 in the district of Hailsham, more than likely in her parish at Heathfield.

John Robert and Mary Jane had five children:
  1. Frederick William Penfold b. 1879, registered in 1880 M Quarter in CROYDON Vol 02A Page 270, died 1 Jan 1918 (see below)
  2. Arthur James Penfold b. 1883 D Quarter in CHELSEA Vol 01A Page 321
  3. Charles Edward Penfold b. 1886 M Quarter in CHELSEA Vol 01A Page 341
  4. Mary Jane Penfold b. 1888 J Quarter in CHELSEA Volume 01A Page 3
  5. Mabel Penfold b. 1890 D Quarter in CHELSEA Volume 01A Page 360
In 1881, John R Penfold (23) from Hartfield, Sussex was living at Field Gate, Mitcham, Croydon, Surrey with wife Mary J Penfold (24), brother Charles Penfold (17) Grocer's assistant and son, Fred W Penfold (1).

In 1891, they were in the Queens Road, Chelsea, London with John R Penfold (33) Boot maker (the Chelsea boot, made popular in that district in 1960's, but the design goes back to Victorian times), Mary J Penfold (34), Arthur J Penfold (7), Charles J Penfold (5), Mary J Penfold (3), Mabel Penfold (0) and Sarah Wilmshurst (68) Widow, Mother-in-law. Frederick William, who would then have been 11, is not listed and I've been unable to find him elsewhere either.

In 1901, living in Hogarth Buildings, 52, Westminster (Hogarth Buildings, Millbank Estate, Westminster. The Millbank Estate, was planned by the Housing of the Working Classes Branch of the London County Council (LCC) Architect’s Department in 1897) were John R Penfold (43) Shoemaker; Frederick W Penfold (21) Commercial clerk; Arthur J Penfold (17) Student; Charles E Penfold (15) Shoemaker; Mary J Penfold (13) and Mabel Penfold (10). Not listed in the household at that time is wife Mary Jane Penfold, however, M J Penfold (45) female patient born in Heathfield, Sussex was listed as a 'Lunatic' in the London County Asylum, The Heath, Dartford. (Heath Asylum, which became Bexley Hospital). The asylum opened in 1898: The first patients moved in before the hospital was completed, initially there being only 4 male and 3 female ward blocks. All were committed ‘lunatics’, none were there on a voluntary basis.

Mary Jane Penfold (48) died, in Dartford, Kent in 1905.

In the 2nd quarter of 1906, John Robert Penfold then remarried to Louisa Morfill in the district St. George Hanover Square. Born Louisa Gamble, she had previously married Thomas Morfill, in Petersfield, Hampshire, in 1881. Or to give him his full name, Wemyss Thomas Cockburn Morfill, born in 1857, in Torrington, Devon, son of James Waugh Morfill a Professor of Music and Elizabeth Green. In 1891, Morfill was in service as a Housekeeper in Ashley Place, Westminster. He had died, at 34, in 1892.) Louisa bought with her two daughters from her previous marriage: May Morfill and Emma Louise Morfill, born in 1882 and 1883, respectively, on Portsea Island, Portsmouth.

Charles Edward Penfold died, aged 21, and was buried on 25 Apr 1907 at Hanwell Cemetery, formerly City of Westminster Cemetery.

In 1911, living at 32 Rampayne Street, Westminster were John Robert Penfold (53) Bootmaker, Louisa Penfold (59), Frederick William Penfold (31) Clerk in tailoring house; May Elisa Morfill (28) Tobacconist; Emma Louise Morfill (27) Tobacconist; Arthur James Penfold (27) Clerk inst civil; Mary Jane Penfold (23) and Mabel Penfold (20) Student. Much can be deduced about their attitudes seeing them listed in order of age, disregarding which family they came from or gender and that Mabel is listed as a Student, worthy of further education.

Frederick William Penfold of 17 Chapter Street, Westminster, died, aged 38, on 1 Jan 1918 at the First London General Hospital, Brixton (The 1st London General Hospital in Cormont Road was a school requisitioned by the military wing of St Bart's during World War I.), leaving his effects to his father, John Robert Penfold, Bootmaker. Private Frederick William PenfoldMiddlesex Regiment 33rd Bn., son of John Robert and Mary Jane Penfold, is buried at Brookwood Military CemeteryBrookwood, Surrey (XIII. E. 6.)

John Robert Penfold died, aged 66, in London, 1924.

Louisa Penfold of Alver Bank, West Road, Clapham Park (Alverbank Residential Home) died, at 84, in Wandsworth, London, on 21 Sep 1936, leaving her effects to her daughter, Emma Louise Tapper (wife of William Frans Tapper).

Sunday, 3 April 2022

William Penfold and Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn

Lingfield, Surrey
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Peter Trimming - geograph.org.uk/p/1929778
Looking towards the Grade I listed church of St. Peter & St. Paul.

William Penfold (bap. 5 Nov 1826 at St Mary the Virgin, Hartfield), son of William Penfold and Hannah Humphrey (m. 1821) married Mary Ann Charlotte Gunn (bap. 25 Jul 1830 at St Nicholas Church, Chiswick), daughter of Robert Gunn and Dinah Powell (m. 1812) at St Peter and St Paul, Lingfield, Surrey on 11 Oct 1851. Witnesses were Thomas and Hannah Tharp.

William and Mary Ann had nine children:
  1. Jane Penfold b. 1853 D Quarter in EAST GRINSTED UNION Volume 02B Page 94, bap. 30 Oct 1853 at St Peter and St PaulLingfield, Surrey
  2. William Robert Penfold b. 1855 D Quarter in CROYDON SURREY Volume 02A Page 123, bap. 20 Jan 1856 in Croydon, Surrey, died 1856 J Quarter Volume 02A Page 82, buried on 13 Apr 1856 in Croydon, Surrey.
  3. John Robert Penfold b. 1857 J Quarter in EAST GRINSTEAD Volume 02B Page 98, bap. 24 May 1857 at St Mary the Virgin, Hartfield
  4. Arthur Edward Penfold b. 1859 J Quarter in EAST GRINSTEAD Volume 02B Page 99, bap. 5 Jun 1859 at St Mary the Virgin, Hartfield
  5. Amelia Dinah Penfold b. 1861 S Quarter in EAST GRINSTEAD Volume 02B Page 104, died, age 5, in 1867 J Quarter Volume 02B Page 74
  6. Frederick William Penfold b. 20 Jul 1863 in EAST GRINSTEAD Volume 02B Page 105
  7. Charles Penfold b. 1865 D Qtr in EAST GRINSTEAD Vol 02B Page 104
  8. Thomas Penfold b. 1868 J Quarter in EAST GRINSTEAD Vol 02B Page 111
  9. George Albert Penfold b. 1870 S Quarter in EAST GRINSTEAD Volume 02B Page 114, died, age 3, in 1874 J Quarter Volume 02B Page 82
In 1861, William Penfold (34) Agricultural Labourer was living in Hartfield Green, Hartfield, East Grinstead, Sussex with wife Mary Ann Penfold (30), Jane Penfold (7), John Penfold (4) and Arthur Edward Penfold (2).

In 1871, still in Hartfield Green, Hartfield, Sussex, were William Penfold (44), Mary Ann C Penfold (40), John R (14), Arthur E (11), Frederick W (7), Charles (5), Thomas (3), George A (0) and Henry Care (15) Nephew.

William Penfold died, aged 46, and was buried in Hartfield on 1 Mar 1873.

In 1881, Mary Ann Penfold (50) widow, was living at the Old Turnpike House, Hartfield - a later newspaper article mentions that her late husband, William Penfold, had been the toll house keeper - with Thomas (13) and Charles Payne (9) Boarder. Frederick William Penfold (18) was with his ship at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda; Charles Penfold (17) Grocer's assistant was living in Mitcham, Surrey in the household of his older brother, John Edward Penfold; there's no knowing where Arthur Edward Penfold was at that time.

Mary Ann Penfold died, aged 55, in 1886, in Chelsea. Newspaper reports indicate that she had died during an epileptic seizure.

So far, I've been unable to isolate records relating to Jane Penfold going forward, because there are too many with that name to tell which relate. 

The penultimate child, Thomas, born in 1868, does not appear anywhere on a census after 1881 at age 13 with his mother. There is however, a death of a Thomas Penfold, of the right age, then 19, born 1868, in 1887, in the district of St. George Hanover Square, which I believe relates. Later newspaper reports allude to the existence of four brothers, which would also support the theory that one (of the five that had survived infancy) had subsequently died.