Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label East Stonehouse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label East Stonehouse. Show all posts

Sunday, 3 July 2022

Thomas Simon Oliver Bailey and Ada Mary Hartwell

Clifton Suspension Bridge

At almost 42, Thomas Simon Oliver Bailey (b. 1 Oct 1869), son of Thomas Bailey and Lucy Elizabeth Ann Fudge, married the 25 year old, Ada Mary Hartwell (b. 1886), daughter of Thomas Cooper Hartwell and Julia Adelaide Hodges, at St Paul's Church, Clifton, Bristol (photo) on 4 Sep 1911.

Thomas Simon Oliver Bailey had enlisted, at the age of 14, in the Royal Marines on 22 Nov 1884, in which he served until 20 Feb 1896, having attained the rank of Corporal in 1894. On 21 Feb 1896, he signed up for 12 years with the Royal Navy, as a Ship's Corporal, from which he was pensioned on 16 Dec 1909.

In 1911, Thomas Bailey, from Stonehouse, Devonshire, listed as 40, was a boarder in the household of John Milton Mann (53) Fine Art Dealer, in Clifton, Bristol and was employed as a Toll Collector by the Clifton Suspension Bridge Company. Meanwhile, Ada Mary Hartwell (24), from Chadbury, Worcestershire, was in service as a domestic cook in Long Ashton, North Somerset, just outside the boundary of city of Bristol urban area.

Thomas and Ada had two children:
  1. Dorothy Ada Bailey b. 1912 D Quarter in BRISTOL Vol 06A Page 8
  2. Stanley Thomas Bailey b. 1914 S Quarter in BRISTOL Vol 06A Page 7
Then along came the First World War and Thomas Bailey was re-engaged by the Royal Navy in Aug 1914, until his final discharge on 1 Mar 1919. 

Records show Thomas and Ada and both children in Plymouth in 1921.

Ada Mary Bailey died, aged 40, in 1927 in Plymouth Volume 05B Page 427.

Thomas S O Bailey is still listed in Plymouth in 1939 (yet to access) and died, aged 79, in 1948 D Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 07A Page 634.

Saturday, 2 July 2022

Richard Hooper and Annie Louisa Bailey

Probus Village
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Tony Atkin - geograph.org.uk/p/195028

Richard Hooper (29) Private RM, son of Thomas Hooper and Caroline Huddy, married Annie Louisa Bailey (23), daughter of Thomas Bailey and Lucy Elizabeth Ann Fudge, at the Anglican Church of Saint George in East Stonehouse, Plymouth, on 21 Mar 1883. Listed as Annie Louisa on marriage, at birth she was registered as Louisa Ann, but appears always to have been known as Annie. 

Richard Hooper was born on 19 Jan 1854 and baptised a month later on 19 Feb 1854 in Probus, Cornwall. He enlisted in the Royal Marines on 19 Feb 1873. On 5 Jul 1878, he embarked on HMS Iron Duke (1870), which departed Plymouth on 4 August, bound for the China Station. At the time of the 1881 Census, Richard Hooper (27) Private RMLI from Probus, Cornwall, was in Hong Kong Harbour. Iron Duke returned home in January 1883, Richard Hooper left the ship on 15 Mar 1883 and clearly, he and Annie married just days later.

Richard's Royal Marine's record show that by the time he was discharged he was 5 ft 5½ in, had brown hair, hazel eyes and a fresh complexion, with a tattoo of Britannia on his right forearm and a ship on the left forearm.

Richard and Annie had four sons:
  1. Richard William Samuel Hooper b. 1884 S Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 313, bap. at East Stonehouse, St George in 1884. Died before his first birthday, in 1885 J Quarter Volume 05B  Page 204.
  2. Thomas Charles Hooper b. 29 Nov 1887, reg. 1888 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 283
  3. Albert Edward Hooper b. 1893 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 295
  4. Francis Victor Emmanuel Hooper b. 29 Aug 1897 S Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 283
At Plymouth Division from 16 Mar 1883 until the December that year, Richard Hooper's next assignment was with HMS Royal Adelaide (1828), by then a depot ship. From 1 Oct 1886 until 2 Mar 1888, he was attached to HMS Cambridge, gunnery ship off Plymouth. Stints with Royal Adelaide, HMS Vivid shore establishment (then Royal Navy designation for the barracks at Devonport) followed and finally back to Plymouth Division, Richard Hooper completed 21 years of service in the Royal Marines on 27 Mar 1894.

In 1891, Richard Hooper (37), Annie Hooper (31) and Thomas (3) were living in Edgcumbe Street, East Stonehouse with Annie's mother, Lucy Bailey.

In 1901, Richard Hooper (47) General Labourer from Probus, Cornwall, wife Annie L Hooper (41), Thomas C Hooper (13) Albert E Hooper (8) and Francis E Hooper (4), were still living in Edgcumbe Street, Plymouth. 

In 1911, Richard Hooper (57) was listed as Brewer's Drayman's Pensioner Royal Marine Light Infantry, with wife Annie L Hooper (51), Albert E Hooper (18) Solicitor's Clerk, Francis E Hooper (13) and Lucy Mary Lenora Symons (11) visitor. Thomas C Hooper (23) was with the Royal Navy At Sea And In Ports Abroad with HMS Exmouth (1901). He may have been in Malta.

Both Thomas and Frank joined the Royal Navy and both served during WWI. Frank was on HMS New Zealand (1911), during the Battle of Jutland.

Richard Hooper died, aged 58, in 1912 J Quarter Volume 05B Page 363.

Annie Hooper died, aged 81, on 8 Sep 1940 (reg. 1940 D Quarter in PLYMOUTH Volume 05B Page 783) and there appears to be an obituary in the Western Morning News (yet to access), which mentions Richard Hooper. 

Thursday, 30 June 2022

William Henry Bailey and Jane Reeby

Edgcumbe Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Mike Rothery - geograph.org.uk/p/4817390

William Henry Bailey (b. 1856) Seaman RN, son of Thomas Bailey and Lucy Elizabeth Ann Fudge, married Jane Reeby (b. 1861), daughter of John Reeby and Mary Francis, at Saint GeorgeStonehouse, Plymouth on 26 Sep 1889. 

William and Jane had two children:
  1. Lucy Mary Bailey b. 1890 D Q in EAST STONEHOUSE Vol 05B Page 272
  2. Samuel William Bailey b. 1893 J Q in EAST STONEHOUSE Vol 05B P 302
In 1891, William Bailey (33) Seaman Royal Navy, Jane Bailey (27) and daughter Lucy M Bailey, were living in the household of William's mother, Lucy Bailey (53), in Edgcumbe Street, East Stonehouse.

However, by 1901, Jane Bailey (39) was widowed, but still living in Edgcumbe Street, East Stonehouse, with Lucy M Bailey (10) and Samuel W Bailey (8). Living at the same address was Thomazine Francis (69) Widowed, described as her Aunt. Thomazine was the widow of Samuel Francis, Sail Maker, who had died in 1898, who was the younger brother of Mary Francis, Jane's mother.

I haven't yet been able to confirm naval record, nor a death record for William Henry Bailey, but it is clear he must have died between begetting his son in 1893 and 1901, when Jane is listed as widowed. There are no death records locally in Plymouth that relate, however there is a record in British Armed Forces And Overseas Deaths And Burials, in 1894, which needs to be investigated.

In 1911, Jane Bailey (49) Widowed, was still in East Stonehouse, with William Bailey (18) Merchant's Clerk at a Coal Merchant, daughter Lucy Bailey (20) and Tamasine Francis (80) Widow, Boarder. (Who died, aged 86, in 1917)

On the marriage certificates for both Lucy in 1912 and William in 1914, they describe their father's rank as having been Chief Petty Officer RN.

Jane Bailey (b. 1861) was still living in Plymouth, at 20 Clarence Place, in 1939, but after that disappears and, as yet, I've found no record of her death.

Wednesday, 29 June 2022

Thomas Bailey and Lucy Elizabeth Ann Fudge

Stonehouse Barracks - Archway entrance
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/4896492

Thomas Bailey (b. 1833) married Lucy Fudge (b. 1836), daughter of Thomas Fudge and Ann Beedle, at the Anglican Church of Saint GeorgeEast Stonehouse, Plymouth on 4 Feb 1856. Originally a chapel-of-ease to Saint Andrew's Church in Plymouth (where Lucy's parents married), St George's was destroyed in the Second World War. At the time of his marriage, Thomas Bailey was a Seaman with HMS Bulldog (1845) and lists his father as Thomas Bailey, Private Royal Marines. As was Lucy's father, Thomas Fudge, Mariner.

As yet, I haven't seen a naval record for Thomas Bailey, however, HMS Bulldog, was on that exact date, 4 Feb 1856, in Devonport, in Keyham Basin. She had just returned from the Baltic Sea from the Russian War (Crimean War) and on 23 Apr 1856, was present at the Fleet Review, Spithead. As Thomas Fudge was on that ship, chances are he's the third of my relatives to be there.

Thomas and Lucy had four children:
  1. William Henry Bailey b. 1856 D Q in EAST STONEHOUSE Vol 05B P 272
  2. Louisa Ann Bailey b. 1858 D Q in EAST STONEHOUSE Vol 05B P 270
  3. Lucy Bailey b. 1861 M Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 327. Died, aged 3, in 1864 M Quarter in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 270 and is buried at Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth.
  4. Thomas Simon Oliver Bailey b. 1 Oct 1869 in STOKE DAMEREL Volume 05B Page 328
In 1861, there is a Thomas Baily (sic) (27) living in Adelaide Place, East Stonehouse, Plymouth with wife Elizabeth Baily (sic) (23), who may have been them. Daughter Ann (Louisa Ann) was staying with her grandparents.

In 1871, Thomas Bailey (38) Naval Pensioner, was living in Mount Street, Stoke Damerel with wife Lucy Bailey (36) and sons, William Bailey (14) and Thomas Bailey (1). Louisa Ann [Anne] (13) was once again living with her grandparents, although listed as their daughter and going by the surname Fudge.

Thomas Bailey of 40 Edgcumbe Street, Stonehouse, died, aged 41, in 1874 J Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 05B Page 209, and he was buried at Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth on 19 May 1874.

Ford Park Cemetery
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/4958844
Ford Park Cemetery is a 34.5-acre cemetery in central Plymouth, established by the Plymouth, Stonehouse & Devonport Cemetery Company in 1846 and opened in 1848. Its official name at the time of inception was The Plymouth, Devonport and Stonehouse Cemetery.

In 1881, Elizabeth Bailey (44) Widow, Green Grocer, was residing at 47, Edgcumbe Street, East Stonehouse with daughter Annie L (Louisa Ann) (22) Assistant Grocer, son Thomas Bailey (11) and Frances M Grey (17) Servant.

In 1891, Lucy Bailey (53) was still a Green Grocer in Edgcumbe Street and living with her were son William Bailey (33) Seaman Royal Navy; daughter Annie (Louisa Ann) Hooper (31) Dressmaker; son-in-law Richard Hooper (37) from Cornwall, Royal Marine; daughter-in-law Jane Bailey (27); granddaughter Lucy M Bailey (0); grandson Thomas Hooper (3) and Carrie Hill (13) Visitor.

In 1901, Lucy E A R Bailey (65) Widow, had become an Innkeeper, at 48, Edgcumbe Street, East Stonehouse. Unfortunately, there are several drinking establishments in Edgcumbe Street among Public Houses, Inns & Taverns of East Stonehouse, so I haven't been able to discover its name. Living with her was youngest son, Thomas S O Bailey (31) Ship's Corporal Royal Navy.

Lucy Elizabeth Ann Regan Bailey (no idea where the Regan came from) of 1 Durnford Street, Stonehouse, died on 10 Nov 1910, she will have been 74. Probate was granted on 25th of the same month, in Exeter, with beneficiaries being Thomas Simon Oliver Bailey, Annie Louisa Hooper and Richard Hooper.

Tuesday, 28 June 2022

Thomas Fudge and Ann Beedle

Church of St Andrew
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/5713509
The Minster Church of St Andrew, also known as St Andrew's Church, Plymouth.

Thomas Fudge, of the Royal Marines, married Ann Beedle, of this Parish, at St Andrew's Church, Plymouth on 12 Aug 1834. Neither could sign their own names. Witnesses were Catherine Murray and James Boulter.

Thomas and Ann had three children:
  1. Lucy Elizabeth Ann Fuge (sic) bap. 7 Aug 1836 in East Stonehouse, Devon
  2. Thomas James Fudge b. 1843 D Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 09 Page 341
  3. Sarah Jane Fudge b. 25 Dec 1850, reg. 1851 M Quarter in EAST STONEHOUSE Volume 09 Page 389
On Lucy Elizabeth Ann's baptism, her father's occupation is given as Drummer, Royal Marines. The registrations of Thomas and Sarah confirm their mother's maiden name as Beedle. Despite there being long gaps between each child, checking year by year through the records at the General Record Office did not reveal any others. Possibly because Thomas was often away at sea.

Navy Allotment Records list Thomas Fudge of 26 High Street, Stonehouse as a Fifer aboard HMS Endymion (1797) in 1841; in 1844 with HMS Mutine (1844) and HMS Mutche in 1845. In 1845, Thomas Fudge from Stonehouse was listed among Merchant Seamen, Merchant Navy & Maritime.

In 1841, Ann Fuge (sic) (25) (ish) was one of a very long list of people (too many for a private house) in Fore Street - with Louisa Fuge (sic) (4) - Lucy, clearly. Fore Street was the site of various establishments such as the Wesleyan Sailors' and Soldiers' Home and the Royal Sailors' Rest and Institute and it could well be one of these or a similar establishment they were staying in.

In 1851, Thomas Fudge (43) Greenwich Pensioner, his birthplace listed as East Stonehouse, Devonshire was living in Edgcumbe Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth with wife Ann Fudge (38), Lucy Fudge (15), Thomas Fudge (7) and baby Sarah Jane, incorrectly listed as Sarah Ann Fudge (sic) (0).

In 1861, living at 10 Providence Place, East Stonehouse was Thomas Fudge (53) Seaman; Ann Fudge (47), Thomas Fudge (17) Rope Maker; Sarah Fudge (11) Scholar and Anne L Fudge (3) Granddaughter. (Who I believe is Louisa Ann Bailey, daughter of Lucy Fudge, who had married Thomas Bailey in 1856.)

In 1871, then living in Bridport Street, Portsea, Hampshire, were Thomas Fudge (64) Seaman Pensioner, Anne Fudge (58) and Anne Fudge (13) who is listed as their daughter, but must be their granddaughter. What I don't understand is why the child is going by the surname Fudge, when she was born in 1858, her parents had married in 1856 and she was the second child anyway.

In 1881, Thomas Fudge (72) Navy Pensioner was living at 33, Bridport Street, Portsea with wife Ann (68). Living with them were their son-in-law George Charles Mew, married to Sarah Jane, along with four grandchildren.

Ann Fudge died, aged 71, in 1885 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 352. Thomas Fudge died back in his native EAST STONEHOUSE, in 1888 J Quarter, Volume 05B Page 205, with his age estimated as 83.

George Charles Mew and Sarah Jane Fudge

Kingston Cemetery, Portsmouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Basher Eyre - geograph.org.uk/p/2655103

George Charles Mew (24) married Sarah Jane Fudge (19) at the Anglican St Mary's Church, Portsea on 3 Mar 1870. This will have been in the second church on the site, built in 1843 and demolished in 1887. The bridegroom, a Steward on HMS Asia, lists his father as George Charles Mew, Petty Officer RN, while the bride, of Bridport Street, Portsmouth - born in 1850, in East Stonehouse, Plymouth, Devon - was the daughter of Thomas Fudge and Ann Beedle. Thomas Fudge, Seaman RN (his own marriage in 1834, listed him as a Royal Marine). Witnesses were Ann Fudge (likely the bride's mother) and W Hatch. 

George Charles Mew was born on 31 Mar 1845 at Cove of Cork, later Queenstown, now Cobh, Ireland. It's claimed he was baptised at St Colman's Cathedral, Cobh on 3 Apr 1845, but this cannot be true as construction of the cathedral was not even begun until 1868. The baptism record may well be held by the Cobh Parish Office, but the venue was undoubtedly St John the Baptist Catholic Church, which had stood on that site from 1810 to 1868 (and was where his parents and my 2x great-grandparents married the year before).

George and Sarah had eleven children in total:
  1. Lucy Elizabeth Ann Mew b. 1870 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 478, bap. Lucia Elizabetha at Portsmouth, St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral in 1872. Died, aged 6, in 1876 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 324.
  2. Mary Ann Mew b. 1872 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 452, bap. Maria Anna at Portsmouth, St John's RC Cathedral in 1872.
  3. George Charles Mew b. 9 Dec 1874, reg. M Quarter 1875 in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 463, bap. 15 August 1877 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth. Died, aged 37 in 1912 M Quarter in PORTSMOUTH Volume 02B Page 663.
  4. Annie Louisa Mew b. 18 May 1877 J Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 504, bap. 15 Aug 1877, at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral.
  5. Henrietta Mew b. 1879 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 493, bap. 1879 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral
  6. Henry Michael Mew b. 10 Oct 1881 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 522, bap. Henricus Michael in 1881, at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral
  7. Mabel Mary Mew b. 1884 S Quarter in PORTSEA Vol 02B Page 480.
  8. Lucy Maria Mew b. 1885 D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 498, bap. Maria Lucia at St John's RC Cathedral, Portsmouth. Died age 1, in 1886 S Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND  Volume 02B  Page 350.
  9. Lucy Mary Mew b. 1887 D Quarter in PORTSEA Vol 02B Page 511.
  10. Margaret Marshall Mew b. 1889, reg. 1890 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 423, bap. Margarita Marshall in 1889 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth.
  11. Andrew Samuel Mew b. 1892, reg 1893 M Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND Volume 02B Page 458, bap. Andreas Samuel in 1893 at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral. Died, aged 2, in 1894  D Quarter in PORTSEA ISLAND  Volume 02B  Page 301, buried at Kingston Cemetery.
George Charles Mew had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1863. 

From 29 Apr 1863 until 31 Dec 1866, he was assigned to HMS Asia (1824), which, by that time was flagship of the Admiral-Superintendent of Portsmouth Dockyard. For much of that time George Charles Mew was a Warrant Officer's Servant or Cook. With HMS Rodney (1833) from 1 Jan 1867 to 4 May 1868, George was back with HMS Asia from 28 May 1868 to 31 Dec 1872 and engaged again from 1 Jan 1873 to 20 Feb 1874. His record in 1873 lists him as being 5ft 3in with brown hair, grey eyes and a dark complexion. 

In 1871, Sarah Mew (20) was lodging in Hertford Street, Portsea with her daughter Losie [Lucy] (0) and Anne Bailey (11) Visitor. This will have been her niece, Luisa Anne [Annie] Bailey, who was actually 13. She is also listed with her grandparents, so possibly being counted twice on a temporary visit. 

From 21 Feb 1874 to 21 Mar 1874, George became yet another (the 4th) of my relatives to serve, albeit briefly, on HMS Duke of Wellington (1852). From 6 May to 24 Aug 1874, he was with HMS Newcastle (1860) and his final posting was with HMS Endymion (1865) - which may have taken him to as exotic a location as Hull - from 25 Aug 1874 to 9 Aug 1875, when he was Invalided. 

In 1881, George Charles Mew (36) then a Tailor's porter, was a Lodger in the household of his in-laws, Thomas Fudge (72) Navy Pensioner and Ann Fudge (68) at 33, Bridport Street, Portsea, along with wife Sarah Jane (29), Mary Ann (9), George Charles (7), Annie Louisa (4) and Henrietta (1).

Sarah Jane, was baptised as Sara Joanna Mew - listed as a convert - at St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Portsmouth, on 3 Jul 1882.

In 1891, in Clarence Street, Portsea, were George Mew (47) Tailor's trimmer, Sarah Mew (40), Mary A (19) Tailoress; George Mew (16) Shoemakers apprentice; Annie Mew (13) Dressmakers apprentice; Henrietta Mew (11), Mabel Mew (7), Henry Mew (9), Lucy Mew (4) and Maggie Mew (1).

George Charles Mew of Clarence Street, Landport died, aged 48, on 8 Apr 1893 and was buried, on 13 April 1893, at at Kingston Cemetery, in a Catholic Slot, 4th Row, 12th Grave, the record states, in Unconsecrated Ground.

In 1901, Sarah Mew (50) Widowed, was still living at 46, Clarence Street, Portsmouth with son Harry Mew (19) Stableman; Mabel Mew (16) Corset Maker; Lucy Mew (13); Maggie Mew (11), married daughter Henrietta Hazzard (21), George Hazzard (22) Son-in-law, Journeyman Bricklayer and James Eyers (23) Blacksmith, Visitor. Son George Charles Mew (26) was a Stable Lad in the employ of Alfred Willson (50) Trainer of Race Horses in East Garston, Berkshire.

In 1911, Sarah Jane Mew (61) was employed as a Stay Lacer in a Stay Factory and living at 40 Fyning Street, Fratton, Portsmouth and living with her were daughter Margaret Marshall Mew (21) Assistant Stock Keeper and Alec John Mew (1), who appears to be Margaret's illegitimate child.

Sarah Jane Mew is reputed to have died in 1936 [yet to find record].

Sunday, 8 August 2021

Albert Stone and Agnes Jones

Tiverton : King's Crescent
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/3053842
On Bert's Marines record, Agnes' address is given as King's Crescent, Tiverton.

Albert Stone (Bert), son of Charles Stone and Emma Middleton and brother of Charley Stone, married Agnes Jones (Daisy), daughter of David Jones and Laura Elizabeth White and sister of Ellen Stone (née Jones), married, on 7 Aug 1926 at the Anglican Church of Saint Matthew, which was in Clarence Place, opposite the former Royal Naval Hospital at East Stonehouse, in Plymouth.

As you may have deduced, the two brothers married two sisters.

On 27 July 1914, at the age of 14½, Albert Stone enlisted as a Bugler in the Royal Marines and from 7 Dec 1914 until 29 May 1917, was assigned to his first ship, HMS Hilary (1914), a former passenger steamship, converted to an armed merchant cruiser for service during the First World War. She was commissioned into the Royal Navy at Liverpool on 6 Dec 1914 and patrolled between the British Isles and the Denmark Strait, often in the area between the Outer Hebrides and Faroe Islands and also to the Shetland Islands. 

On 25 May 1917, HMS Hilary was torpedoed and sunk west of the Shetlands, by German submarine, SM U-88, captained by Kapitänleutnant Walther Schwieger. Schwieger was infamous for sinking RMS Lusitania two years earlier - an event Agnes (Daisy) remembered as a child of eight, living in Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, where both survivors and dead were brought ashore. 

Bert was, of course, one of the survivors in the seven lifeboats from HMS Hilary, picked up by the naval drifter Maggie Bruce or the destroyer HMS Sarpedon.

After that, Bert was transferred to Plymouth Division and was at Deal from Sep 17 to Apr 18, becoming a Private in Dec 17, shortly before he was 18.

From 25 June 1919 to 21 Aug 1919, Bert embarked on HMS Cornwall (1902), presumably for her return journey from Bermuda to Devonport.

In Oct-Nov of that year, he was at HMS Impregnable training establishment (at that point the former HMS Black Prince (1861) in Devonport. And then at the HMS Vivid shore establishment from Dec 1919 until Dec 1920. 

British battleship HMS Ramillies

His subsequent excursions were with: 
Bert, who had been promoted to Corporal in July 1927, was discharged at the end of his second period of engagement in Jan 1939. But, on 27 Sep 1939, he was back for service during World War II, until 1 Jan 1942.

Bert and Daisy had two sons, Albert Henry Stone (1927-1999) and one living.

In 1939, Albert Stone, Postman, wife Agnes, son Albert H (Harry) and two other occupants were living at 9 Falconhurst Road, Birmingham.

Albert Stone died in 1974. Agnes died in 2000.

Sunday, 1 August 2021

Charley Stone and Ellen Jones

St George's Church, Tiverton

Charley Stone (Char), son of Charles Stone and Emma Middleton, married Ellen Jones (Nell), daughter of David Jones and Laura Elizabeth White, on 3 Jul 1922, at St George's Church, Tivertongenerally considered to be the finest Georgian church in Devon, and one of the best examples in England. Witnesses: Francis Stone, the groom's uncle; William Henry Middleton, the groom's elder half-brother and their mother, Emily Stone (former Emma Middleton). Given that line up, my feeling is that Bill was best man, while Frank gave away the bride.

Charley Stone born 6 Jun 1898 at 1 Silver Street, Tiverton, and baptised on 20 Jul 1898 at St Peter’s Church Tiverton, lied about his age when he enlisted in the Royal Marines at Exeter on 18 Jan 1915, which is why this and many subsequent records for him suggest he was born a year earlier in 1897. They can't ever have discovered the one year discrepancy though, because his record notes the 139 days he was underage, from 18 Jan 1915 to 5 Jun 1915, but 6 Jun 1915 will only have been his 17th birthday. 

Char did his training at the Royal Marine Depot, Deal, until 18 Aug 1915. Then after a brief period at Plymouth Division, was assigned to HMS Revenge (06) on 1 Feb 1916 and stayed with this ship until 24 Jan 1918, being promoted to Corporal on the 1st day of that year.

Revenge (left) and the battleship Hercules (right) at the Battle of Jutland

Consequently, on 31 May - 1 Jun 1916, just five days before his 18th birthday, Charley Stone took part in the Battle of Jutlandthe largest naval battle of the First World War. "In the course of the battle, Revenge had fired 102 rounds from her main battery [...]. She also fired 87 rounds from her secondary guns. She was not hit by any fire during the engagement." [Thankfully.]

British battleship HMS Glory at Murmansk
From 23 May 1918, until 16 Jul 1919, Char was assigned to HMS Glory (1899), of the British North Russia Squadron, which took him to Archangel and Murmansk during the North Russia intervention. "Glory was based at Archangel to protect supplies that arrived there for the Russian Army. The squadron's mission evolved after the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 into preventing the supplies that had been delivered from falling into the hands of the Red Army." 

Char will have arrived just in time for A Fire, a Riot, a Bombing, and a Mutiny

Like most who went through these events, Char never spoke about his experiences, except to a brother who was also a Marine, and what I've been told of that only intimated that things were really bad (understatement) up there. 
HMS Royalist (1883)
Continuing his amazing ability to turn up in all the wrong places at the right times, from 12 Feb 1920 to 15 Mar 1922 Char was sent to HMS Colleen (formerly HMS Royalist (1883)), which was then the depot ship at Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, at the height of the Irish War of Independence. Being hulked (stuck in one place), allowed more opportunity to fraternise with the locals.

Nell and Char's only child, Charles Francis Stone (Frank) was born, on 17 July 1923 at The Military Families Hospital, Devonport and christened at The Anglican Church of Saint Paul, Durnford Street, East Stonehouse on Sunday, 5 Aug 1923. This was the day after the wedding of Char's first cousin Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey, at which he was best man and could have been the new baby's first "social engagement" - not that he'd have remembered it - but it feels like a real connection to the past to imagine that maybe Maria Mullarkey, the bride's mother, may have fawned over the new infant (as you do). The family's address at that time was 36, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse (now The Fig Tree Restaurant.)

Nell and Char's only child, Charles Francis Stone (Frank), aged around three.

The rest of Char's Royal Marines' career was spent mostly at Plymouth Division - they lived in the Eastern King battery - and at HMS Impregnable training establishments in Devonport: the former HMS Black Prince (1861) in late 1922 and the former HMS Ganges (1821) in 1923/24. Char was promoted to Sergeant from 9 Aug 1924, Colour sergeant from 2 Apr 1931, and Quartermaster sergeant (QMS) in Aug 1932, retiring on 5 Jun 1936. 

Charley Stone's uniform tunic now in the possession of the Royal Marines Museum

Nell and Char on their
25th Wedding Anniversary
in 1947, in the garden of 117,
Corisande Road, Selly Oak.
After he retired from the Royal Marines, Char took a job as a Post Office Van Driver in Birmingham, which is where we find the family in 1939, at 117 Corisande Road, Selly Oak with Charley Stone, Postman Driver (Heavy Work) still listing himself as a year older and Ellen trying to be two years younger than she was. Frank (16) was working as a Stationery clerk at the Screw Works. 

Char worked as a gardener before he'd joined the marines, having worked, casually, in the kitchen garden at Knightshayes Court in Tiverton. In Birmingham, he grew soft fruits - I remember being sent up the garden to pick raspberries and blackcurrants - and he had a greenhouse stuffed full of his favourite fuchsias that, in his Devon accent were always pronounced foosherrs.

Charley Stone died on 10 May 1973 at Selly Oak Hospital. He was 75.

Ellen Stone died on 31 Jan 1993 in Highcliffe, Dorset, in her 99th year.

Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne

Wyndham Street West, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1777663
With the spire of the 
Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey, son of Martin Mullarkey and possibly Catherine Loughlin, married Maria Gloyne, daughter of Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes, on 20 Nov 1887 at the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface, Plymouth. On his Royal Marines record, Anthony Mullarkey (b. 5 Dec 1864), said he was from Garston, Liverpool. He had enlisted, in Liverpool, on 5 Jun 1883, his previous job being a Labourer and professed to be Roman Catholic. However, in 1881, Anthony Mullarkey (16) General Labourer, had been boarding at 8, Hughes Street, Garston, along with his father, Martin Mullarkey (40) and Michael Mullarkey (7). All three were said to be from Ireland.

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne had three children:

  1. John Martin Mullarkey b. 10 May 1890
  2. Anthony Charles Mullarkey b. 12 Jan 1893
  3. Kathleen Mullarkey b. 17 Jan 1896
All three were baptised, on 1 May 1896, at St Paul's, East Stonehouse - The Anglican Church, situated at the southern end of Durnford Street. The family's address on these baptism records was listed as 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, with their father's rank listed as Private RMLI.

Victualling yard at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda
Captain-tucker, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

On 20 Dec 1895, Anthony had joined HMS Terror (1856) (a 16-gun iron screw floating battery launched in 1856. She became the base ship at Bermuda in 1857), from which he was Discharged Dead (at 32) on 2 Dec 1896. 

In 1901, Maria Mullarkey (36), Seamstress, Widow, was still living at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse with John (11), Charles (8) and Kathleen (5).

In 1911, and still at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Maria Mullarkey (48) was in receipt of a pension from the Admiralty. Anthony Charles Mullarkey (18) Bugler RMLI was home on leave and Kathleen Mullarkey (15) was an apprentice tailoress to a Military Tailor. John Martin Mullarkey (20) was serving with the Royal Navy on HMS Medea (HMS Medea (1888), anchored in Malta Harbour.

Maria Mullarkey died in East Stonehouse in 1924, aged 61.

Monday, 19 July 2021

Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey

St Paul Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

Frederick Thomas Stone, of 9 St Paul's Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, second son of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, married Kathleen Mullarkey, tailoress, of 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, only daughter of Anthony Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, at the King Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, on 4 Aug 1923. Witnesses to the marriage were the bridegroom's first cousin, Charley Stone (undoubtedly best man); Rosina Kathleen Stone, the bridegroom's younger sister (bridesmaid perhaps), and Anthony Charles Mullarkey, the bride's brother, who presumably gave her away. At the time of his marriage, Frederick Thomas Stone gave his rank as Leading Signalman, H.M.S. Sandhurst. Both the bridegroom's father, Tom Stone, and the bride's father, Anthony Mullarkey (both deceased), had been Royal Marines, as were Charley Stone and Anthony Charles Mullarkey. That saved 'em on lounge suits! 

Frederick and Kathleen had two sons: 

  1. Frederick Anthony Stone born 25 July 1924
  2. Douglas John Stone born 27 Sep 1927
Frederick Thomas Stone had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a boy of 15, on 6 Jul 1907 and served until 31 March 1924. He then re-entered on 30 May 1932 as a Signalman. As he was still living in Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages in 1957, I think it safe to deduce that he served through both World Wars.

His naval record lists among his tattoos: an anchor on his right forearm; two female figures and a bird on his right forearm; Eagle, snake, Ensign, rose and thistle. Clasped hands and heart and 8 dots on left forearm. 

Royal Hospital School Bell Tower
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Jones - geograph.org.uk/p/2513717

In 1939, Frederick A Stone was a boarder at the Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy"). I've been unable to locate Frederick Thomas, Kathleen or son Douglas in 1939.

On 11 Aug 1943, Douglas J Stone appears on a "List or Manifest of Aliens Employed on the Vessel as Members of the Crew" of the Marquesa, as an apprentice on his 1st trip to New York. He was 16, 5' 4" and 123lbs.

Part of the old Buckland Hospital, Coombe Valley Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Baker - geograph.org.uk/p/5105714

Frederick Thomas Stone of 5 Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages, Old Folkstone Road, Dover, died on 11 Nov 1957, aged 65, at Buckland Hospital, Dover, leaving effects of £960 12s 5d to Frederick Anthony Stone, Chief Electrician R.N. and Douglas John Stone, Laboratory Assistant. As she isn't a beneficiary, Kathleen had presumably pre-deceased her husband, but I've [so far] been unable to identify the relevant record of her death.

Douglas John Stone died in 1985 in Kingsbridge, Devon. He will have been 58.

Frederick Anthony Stone died, also in 1985, on 19 Mar, in Newport, Wales. He will have been 60. There is a record of a marriage of a Frederick A Stone in Newport, in 1950, which might explain his presence there. 

Tuesday, 6 July 2021

Edward Priddle and Ethel Annie Beamer

St Peter's Church, Wyndham Square, Plymouth
Plymouth's five star-rated building a select few people have been inside of
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Tom Jolliffe - geograph.org.uk/p/2342746

Ethel Annie Beamer, daughter of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Edward Priddle, Sergeant RMLI, son of James Priddle and Catherine Stevens, on 14 Oct 1905 at St Peter’s Church, Plymouth. Witnesses to their marriage were Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton, the bride's brother and his intended, who married exactly two months later in Tiverton, Devon.

Edward Priddle, born in Hackney, London on 12 Apr 1875, at 16, was employed by his father, who was a shoe maker, as a Clicker (A boot and shoe clicker is the person who cuts the uppers for boots or shoes), in Shoreditch. Edward subsequently enlisted in the Royal Marines on 27 Jan 1896 and served until 3 Mar 1918, finally attaining the rank of Lieutenant.

Edward and Ethel had three daughters, baptised at Plymouth, St Peter:
  1. Ethel Annie Priddle born 13 Jul 1906, bap. 29 Jul 1906 (died 1909, at 2)
  2. Winifred May Priddle born 4 May 1909, bap. 20 May 1909 
  3. Mary Caroline Priddle born 29 Dec 1912, bap. 2 Feb 1913
In 1911, Edward Priddle (35) Sergeant Royal Marines, Ethel Annie (28) and Winifred May (1), were living at 40 Neswick Street Plymouth.

In 1939, the family including Edward Priddle, Retired RM, Ethel A, and Ethel's widowed mother, Mary Ann Beamer were living at 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth. Winifred May Priddle was an Assistant Mistress at a Secondary School in Exeter and Mary C Hadley and her husband, John Harold Hadley (Retail Tobacconist Proprietor), were residing at 42 Chestnut Road, Plymouth.

Ethel Annie Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 12 May 1959, leaving £281 17s 9d to her husband, Edward Priddle, Retired Lieutenant RM. 

Edward Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 21 Jun 1962. He was 87. He left effects of £2809 11s to his two daughters, Winifred May Mayner (m. 1959) and Mary Caroline Tomkins (m. 1951). 

Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White

Adelaide Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/6083118

Alfred Beamer, son of James Beamer and Rose Anna Smith and half-brother of Loveday Jane Land and John Land, married Mary Ann White (b. 1851), daughter of Alfred Augustus Harker White and Mary Sorton, on 23 Nov 1879 at Saint George's Church, Stonehouse (bombed in the Second World War). Alfred Beamer's rank or profession was listed as Private RM. Alfred Beamer, born 29 Dec 1853, had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 29 Dec 1871.

Alfred and Mary Ann had five children:
  1. Alfred Beamer born 28 Aug 1880 in East Stonehouse [a]
  2. Ethel Annie Beamer born 23 Feb 1883 in East Stonehouse [a]
  3. William George Beamer born 4 Jan 1886 in East Stonehouse [a]
  4. Rosa May Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 in Tiverton [b] (nothing after 1911)
  5. Frederick John Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 (died 1896, aged 3) in Tiverton [b]
In 1881, Mary A Beamer (29), Marines Wife, was living at 47, Adelaide Street, East Stonehouse, with son Alfred (0) and her sister Mary J White (19). Mary Ann, who's mother was named Mary, and her mother before her was also Mary (her parents even married, on 15 December 1850, when Mary Sorton was a minor (19), at St Mary’s Church Plympton) had a younger sister, Mary Jane!

[a] Alfred, Ethel Annie and William George were all baptised, on 19 Jan 1886, at the Anglican Church of Saint Matthew, which was located in Clarence Place, opposite the former Royal Naval Hospital at East Stonehouse, Plymouth.

Again in 1891, Mary A Beamer (38) was listed as the head of the household "Supported by husband", with children: Alfred (10), Ethel A (8) and William G (5), living at Union Place, East Stonehouse.

Alfred completed 21 years service in the Royal Marines, with a final date of 6 Jan 1893, however, both William George and Ethel Annie were registered in the National School Admission Registers at Halberton in Nov 1892.

[b] Registered at the GRO as Rosa May, this twin was baptised Rosa Mary, when she and Frederick John were both baptised "privately" on the same day they were born, 7 Jan 1893, in Halberton. Their address at this time was Valley House, Halberton and Alfred was employed as a labourer.
Private baptism: "When looking through a baptism register, you’ll sometimes see a note saying that the child was privately baptised. This means the child wasn’t baptised at Sunday service, usually because it was thought too weak to survive until then. [...] but it can mean the child was baptised by the priest visiting the family home, or by the midwife attending the birth. In fact, according to Anglican practice, in an emergency, a baptism may be performed by anyone who is already themselves baptised, so it could be the case that some private, at home baptisms, were performed by a member of the child’s family."

In 1901, they were back in Plymouth at 19, Cecil Street, Stonehouse, with Alfred Beamer (46), Labourer at Victualling Yard, wife Mary (49) and their two daughters, Ettie (Ethel) (18) and Rosa (8). Son Alfred was away, having joined the Royal Marines, while William was away training in the Royal Navy.

And in 1911, at 40 Neswick Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth, are Alfred Beamer (57) Pensioner Royal Marine Labourer Royal William Victualling Yard, wife Mary Ann (59), Rose May (18) and Mary Jane White (51), Mary Ann's sister.

In 1939, Mary Ann, widow, was living with her married daughter, Ethel Priddle. So far, I've been unable to find a record of Alfred Beamer's death. There are no records beyond 1911 for daughter, Rosa May either.

Mary Ann Beamer of 2 Glendower Road, Peverell, Plymouth, died on 17 May 1950. She was aged 99. A notice of her death had appeared in the Western Morning News on 19 May 1950 and Mary Ann was buried, on 20 May 1950, at The Parish Church of St Gabriel, Peverell Terrace, Peverell, Plymouth. 

Wednesday, 2 June 2021

David Jones Naval Pensioner

The stern gallery of HMS Implacable, formerly the Duguay-Trouin, on display at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Geni, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

My great-grandfather, David Jones, made much of the fact that he was a Naval Pensioner, especially when filling out official forms, and it seems certain that it was 'useful' in obtaining him the position of Sexton at the Christ Church, Church of Ireland, Rushbrooke, Cobh (Queenstown, as it was then), Ireland. 

We had been told that David had "lost a hand in battle". You gotta love a family story. As I keep saying, there's always a grain of truth in them, but usually some self-serving embellishment. We searched high and low for a naval battle in the right era and came up with nothing. "In battle" sounds more heroic, clearly. Maybe it also proved handy (pun intended) in attracting him two wives!

My cousin recounted that her older sister had remembered visiting the family in Rushbrooke and seeing David's 'Sunday Best' gloved hand hanging up in the kitchen (such a creepy image) and continued that, apparently, he had a fork attachment for everyday - from which we may deduce that it was his left hand he lost - that attached to a metal pin that was inserted at his wrist. 

Because David had always claimed to come from Wales, I almost missed his naval record. In fact, I'd dismissed it twice, because, although many other details were close enough, the boy was born in Lincolnshire, which didn't seem relevant at all. Then I found his father's posting to Sutton Bridge, Lincolnshire and David's birth there and the pieces of the puzzle began to fall into place.

At the time David was enlisted in the Royal Navy as a Boy Second Class, on 7 July 1865, he would have been just shy of his 15th birthday. His father, Thomas Jones, and mother, Mary, co-signed the papers. David was described as being 4ft 8½in tall, with a sallow complexion, dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Once he was 18, his period of engagement was intended to last ten years, obviously intending to follow in the footsteps of his father's naval career. 

David Jones' Naval Record

The rest of David's naval record fits onto one line. At 14 he was assigned to HMS Implacable, which had become the Royal Navy's first training ship at Devonport in 1855. But instead of continuing his service as planned, David was discharged on 17 Oct 1866, when he will have been just 16. The last item on the line, under the Cause of Discharge, is the abbreviation for Invalided.

There not being more detail, nor medical records we can access, we have to surmise the rest of story. That he lost a hand is not in question. He was still in training, so there was no 'battle'. But, taking into consideration that this was 1866 - general anesthesia was still very much in experimental infancy - my feeling is that the only place that such a procedure as inserting a metal pin into his wrist was likely to be carried out was in a military hospital and at that time there was the the former Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse. That they did this and sent him off with a pension at 16, suggests that the Navy was at fault and, my cousin's sister had recalled that this was as a result of an exploding gun.

Former Royal Naval Hospital, High Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/6083123
The Royal Naval Hospital, East Stonehouse