Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label East Stonehouse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label East Stonehouse. Show all posts

Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne

Wyndham Street West, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1777663
With the spire of the 
Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne had married on 20 Nov 1887 at the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface, Plymouth. 

Maria Gloyne, born 1863, in Plymouth, was the daughter of Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes, who had married in East Stonehouse in the 2nd quarter of 1851. At the time of the 1851 Census, Samuel Gloyne (22) Merchant Sailor, was lodging with John Coombes (55) Widower, a Scavenger (a scavenger, as a job in Victorian times, was a dustman or street cleaner), his unmarried daughter, Emma Coombes (21) and John Coombes (2), Grandson. In 1861, Samuel Coombes was away, presumably at sea, while Emma lived at 1, Gasking Street, Charles, Plymouth. John (13) was then listed as John Gloyn, rather than Coombes and had become a Rope Marker's Assistant. 

Maria also had siblings: Charlotte Emma Gloyne (b. 28 Dec 1854), Emma Jane Gloyne (b. 28 Jul 1858) and Samuel Richard Pascoe Gloyne (b. 14 Aug 1861), with all three baptised, on 1 Sep 1861, at Charles Church, Plymouth.

In 1881, Emma Gloyne was lodging at 37, North Street, Plymouth, just with daughter Maria Gloyne (17) General Servant (Out of Employment). By 1891, Emma Gloyn (60) Nurse, Widow, was lodging in Mildmay Street, Plymouth.

Speke and Garston Coastal Reserve
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Dixon - geograph.org.uk/p/4069433
Looking along the shore of the River Mersey towards Garston Docks

Meanwhile, Anthony Mullarkey (b. 5 Dec 1864), says on his Royal Marines record, that he was from Garston, Liverpool. He enlisted in Liverpool on 5 Jun 1883, his previous job being a Labourer and professed to be Roman Catholic. 

In 1881, Anthony Mullarkey (16) General Labourer, had been boarding at 8, Hughes Street, Garston, along with his father, Martin Mullarkey (40) and younger brother, Michael Mullarkey (7), among a total of 15, mostly Irish, people in the one house. All three said to be from Ireland.

In 1891, Martin Mullarkey (51) General labourer for corporation and his younger son, Michael Mullarkey (17) Shoemaker, were lodging in Thomas Street, Garston. It narrows it down to them being from Mayo, Ireland

On both of these censuses, Martin Mullarkey is described as a widower, which may be doubtful, as several newspaper reports had appeared, one in the Manchester Evening News, on Tuesday, 2 Apr 1872.

AN EXTRORDINARY DEFENCE:- At Liverpool Police Court, yesterday, an Irishman named Martin Mullarkey was charged with bigamy. It having been proved that he was married, some few years ago, at a Roman Catholic chapel near Westport, County Mayo, and that he was married to a woman named Julia Garvey, in Liverpool, about twelve months since, the first wife being still alive, he was called on for his defence. He said that the first marriage was a forced one; that he was taken sixteen miles from his home by a lot of men, and married in spite of himself. (Roars of laughter.) This was done in the dead of night; and he did not think it was allowed for a man to be married without a certificate or anything of that kind. One of the witnesses for the prosecution admitted that the marriage took place at about eleven o'clock at night. The prisoner was remanded.

A later report in the same newspaper on Tuesday, 16 Apr 1872, named the first wife as Miss Catherine Loughlin, who he had married in Islandeady, Mayo, about 12 years previously. It also went on to say that, "The second wife said she did not wish to prosecute, and the prisoner was discharged." She wished to see no more of him, provided he paid for the expense of maintaining the child.

Yet another report, in the Belfast Evening Telegraph on Thursday, 18 Apr 1872, under the headline, BIGAMY MADE EASY, added that Mullarkey had emigrated to England about two years ago (i.e. 1870) and that this second marriage had resulted in the birth of a child. "The circumstance at length reached the ears of the first wife, who came to England in search of her errant husband ..."

Is this the same Martin Mullarkey from Mayo? It certainly fits. 

I've not been able to find birth or marriage records in Ireland to confirm, but I think it safe to believe that Anthony Mullarkey was originally from County Mayo, Ireland and that his mother may or may not have been Catherine Loughlin.

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne had three children:

  1. John Martin Mullarkey b. 10 May 1890
  2. Anthony Charles Mullarkey b. 12 Jan 1893
  3. Kathleen Mullarkey b. 17 Jan 1896
All three children were baptised, on 1 May 1896, at St Paul's, East Stonehouse. The family's address on these baptism records was listed as 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, with their father's rank listed as Private RMLI.

On 20 Dec 1895, Anthony had joined HMS Terror (1856) (a 16-gun iron screw floating battery launched in 1856. She became the base ship at Bermuda in 1857), from which he was Discharged Dead (at 32) on 2 Dec 1896. 

In 1901, Maria Mullarkey (36), Seamstress, Widow, was still living at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse with John (11), Charles (8) and Kathleen (5).

In 1911, and still at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Maria Mullarkey (48) was in receipt of a pension from the Admiralty. Anthony Charles Mullarkey (18) Bugler RMLI was home on leave and Kathleen Mullarkey (15) was an apprentice tailoress to a Military Tailor. John Martin Mullarkey (20) was serving with the Royal Navy on HMS Medea (HMS Medea (1888) was a Marathon-class second class cruiser launched in 1888 and sold in 1914), anchored in Malta Harbour.

Maria Mullarkey died in East Stonehouse in 1924, aged 61.

Monday, 19 July 2021

Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey

St Paul Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

Frederick Thomas Stone, of 9 St Paul's Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, second son of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, married Kathleen Mullarkey, tailoress, of 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, only daughter of Anthony Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, at the King Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, on 4 Aug 1923. Witnesses to the marriage were the bridegroom's first cousin, Charley Stone (undoubtedly best man); Rosina Kathleen Stone, the bridegroom's younger sister (bridesmaid perhaps), and Anthony Charles Mullarkey, the bride's brother, who presumably gave her away. At the time of his marriage, Frederick Thomas Stone gave his rank as Leading Signalman, H.M.S. Sandhurst. Both the bridegroom's father, Tom Stone, and the bride's father, Anthony Mullarkey (both deceased), had been Royal Marines, as were Charley Stone and Anthony Charles Mullarkey. That saved 'em on lounge suits! 

Frederick and Kathleen had two sons: 

  1. Frederick Anthony Stone born 25 July 1924
  2. Douglas John Stone born 27 Sep 1927
Frederick Thomas Stone had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a boy of 15, on 6 Jul 1907 and served until 31 March 1924. He then re-entered on 30 May 1932 as a Signalman. As he was still living in Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages in 1957, I think it safe to deduce that he served through both World Wars.

His naval record lists among his tattoos: an anchor on his right forearm; two female figures and a bird on his right forearm; Eagle, snake, Ensign, rose and thistle. Clasped hands and heart and 8 dots on left forearm. 

Royal Hospital School Bell Tower
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Jones - geograph.org.uk/p/2513717

In 1939, Frederick A Stone was a boarder at the Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy"). I've been unable to locate Frederick Thomas, Kathleen or son Douglas in 1939.

On 11 Aug 1943, Douglas J Stone appears on a "List or Manifest of Aliens Employed on the Vessel as Members of the Crew" of the Marquesa, as an apprentice on his 1st trip to New York. He was 16, 5' 4" and 123lbs.

Part of the old Buckland Hospital, Coombe Valley Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Baker - geograph.org.uk/p/5105714

Frederick Thomas Stone of 5 Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages, Old Folkstone Road, Dover, died on 11 Nov 1957, aged 65, at Buckland Hospital, Dover, leaving effects of £960 12s 5d to Frederick Anthony Stone, Chief Electrician R.N. and Douglas John Stone, Laboratory Assistant. As she isn't a beneficiary, Kathleen had presumably pre-deceased her husband, but I've [so far] been unable to identify the relevant record of her death.

Douglas John Stone died in 1985 in Kingsbridge, Devon. He will have been 58.

Frederick Anthony Stone died, also in 1985, on 19 Mar, in Newport, Wales. He will have been 60. There is a record of a marriage of a Frederick A Stone in Newport, in 1950, which might explain his presence there. 

Tuesday, 6 July 2021

Edward Priddle and Ethel Annie Beamer

St Peter's Church, Wyndham Square, Plymouth
Plymouth's five star-rated building a select few people have been inside of
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Tom Jolliffe - geograph.org.uk/p/2342746

Ethel Annie Beamer, daughter of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Edward Priddle, Sergeant RMLI, son of James Priddle and Catherine Stevens, on 14 Oct 1905 at St Peter’s Church, Plymouth. Witnesses to their marriage were Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton, the bride's brother and his intended, who married exactly two months later in Tiverton, Devon.

Edward Priddle, born in Hackney, London on 12 Apr 1875, at 16, was employed by his father, who was a shoe maker, as a Clicker (A boot and shoe clicker is the person who cuts the uppers for boots or shoes), in Shoreditch. Edward subsequently enlisted in the Royal Marines on 27 Jan 1896 and served until 3 Mar 1918, finally attaining the rank of Lieutenant.

Edward and Ethel had three daughters, baptised at Plymouth, St Peter:
  1. Ethel Annie Priddle born 13 Jul 1906, bap. 29 Jul 1906 (died 1909, at 2)
  2. Winifred May Priddle born 4 May 1909, bap. 20 May 1909 
  3. Mary Caroline Priddle born 29 Dec 1912, bap. 2 Feb 1913
In 1911, Edward Priddle (35) Sergeant Royal Marines, Ethel Annie (28) and Winifred May (1), were living at 40 Neswick Street Plymouth.

In 1939, the family including Edward Priddle, Retired RM, Ethel A, and Ethel's widowed mother, Mary Ann Beamer were living at 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth. Winifred May Priddle was an Assistant Mistress at a Secondary School in Exeter and Mary C Hadley and her husband, John Harold Hadley (Retail Tobacconist Proprietor), were residing at 42 Chestnut Road, Plymouth.

Ethel Annie Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 12 May 1959, leaving £281 17s 9d to her husband, Edward Priddle, Retired Lieutenant RM. 

Edward Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 21 Jun 1962. He was 87. He left effects of £2809 11s to his two daughters, Winifred May Mayner (m. 1959) and Mary Caroline Tomkins (m. 1951). 

Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White

Adelaide Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/6083118

Alfred Beamer, son of James Beamer and Rose Anna Smith and half-brother of Loveday Jane Land and John Land, married Mary Ann White (b. 1851), daughter of Alfred Augustus Harker White and Mary Sorton, on 23 Nov 1879 at Saint George's Church, Stonehouse (bombed in the Second World War). Alfred Beamer's rank or profession was listed as Private RM. Alfred Beamer, born 29 Dec 1853, had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 29 Dec 1871.

Alfred and Mary Ann had five children:
  1. Alfred Beamer born 28 Aug 1880 in East Stonehouse [a]
  2. Ethel Annie Beamer born 23 Feb 1883 in East Stonehouse [a]
  3. William George Beamer born 4 Jan 1886 in East Stonehouse [a]
  4. Rosa May Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 in Tiverton [b] (nothing after 1911)
  5. Frederick John Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 (died 1896, aged 3) in Tiverton [b]
In 1881, Mary A Beamer (29), Marines Wife, was living at 47, Adelaide Street, East Stonehouse, with son Alfred (0) and her sister Mary J White (19). Mary Ann, who's mother was named Mary, and her mother before her was also Mary (her parents even married, on 15 December 1850, when Mary Sorton was a minor (19), at St Mary’s Church Plympton) had a younger sister, Mary Jane!

[a] Alfred, Ethel Annie and William George were all baptised, on 19 Jan 1886, at the Anglican Church of Saint Matthew, which was located in Clarence Place, opposite the former Royal Naval Hospital at East Stonehouse, Plymouth.

Again in 1891, Mary A Beamer (38) was listed as the head of the household "Supported by husband", with children: Alfred (10), Ethel A (8) and William G (5), living at Union Place, East Stonehouse.

Alfred completed 21 years service in the Royal Marines, with a final date of 6 Jan 1893, however, both William George and Ethel Annie were registered in the National School Admission Registers at Halberton in Nov 1892.

[b] Registered as Rosa May, this twin was baptised Rosa Mary, when she and Frederick John were both baptised, "privately" (does this mean a house call?) on the same day they were born, 7 Jan 1893, in Halberton. Their address at this time was Valley House, Halberton and Alfred was employed as a labourer.


In 1901, they were back in Plymouth at 19, Cecil Street, Stonehouse, with Alfred Beamer (46), Labourer at Victualling Yard, wife Mary (49) and their two daughters, Ettie (Ethel) (18) and Rosa (8). Son Alfred was away, having joined the Royal Marines, while William was away training in the Royal Navy.

And in 1911, at 40 Neswick Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth, are Alfred Beamer (57) Pensioner Royal Marine Labourer Royal William Victualling Yard, wife Mary Ann (59), Rose May (18) and Mary Jane White (51), Mary Ann's sister.

In 1939, Mary Ann, widow, was living with her married daughter, Ethel Priddle. So far, I've been unable to find a record of Alfred Beamer's death. There are no records beyond 1911 for daughter, Rosa May either.

Mary Ann Beamer of 2 Glendower Road, Peverell, Plymouth, died on 17 May 1950. She was aged 99. A notice of her death had appeared in the Western Morning News on 19 May 1950 and Mary Ann was buried, on 20 May 1950, at The Parish Church of St Gabriel, Peverell Terrace, Peverell, Plymouth. 

Wednesday, 2 June 2021

David Jones Naval Pensioner

The stern gallery of HMS Implacable, formerly the Duguay-Trouin, on display at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Geni, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

My great-grandfather, David Jones, made much of the fact that he was a Naval Pensioner, especially when filling out official forms, and it seems certain that it was 'useful' in obtaining him the position of Sexton at the Christ Church, Church of Ireland, Rushbrooke, Cobh (Queenstown, as it was then), Ireland. 

My late cousin Margery in Ireland (David's brother Nicholas' granddaughter) had told me that David had "lost a hand in battle". You gotta love a family story. As I keep saying, there's always a grain of truth in them, but usually some self-serving embellishment. We searched high and low for a naval battle in the right era and came up with nothing. "In battle" sounds more heroic, clearly.

It also proved handy (pun intended) in attracting him two wives, it seems!

Margery recounted that her older sister had remembered visiting the family in Rushbrooke and seeing David's 'Sunday Best' gloved hand hanging up in the kitchen (such a creepy image) and continued that, apparently, he had a fork attachment for everyday - from which we may deduce that it was his left hand he lost - that attached to a metal pin that was inserted at his wrist. 

Because David had always claimed to come from Wales, I almost missed his naval record. In fact, I'd dismissed it twice, because, although many other details were close enough, the boy was born in Lincolnshire, which didn't seem relevant at all. Then I found his father's posting to Sutton Bridge, Lincolnshire and David's birth there and the pieces of the puzzle began to fall into place.

At the time David was enlisted in the Royal Navy as a Boy Second Class, on 7 July 1865, he would have been just shy of his 15th birthday. His father, Thomas Jones, and mother, Mary, co-signed the papers. David was described as being 4ft 8½in tall, with a sallow complexion, dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Once he was 18, his period of engagement was intended to last ten years, obviously intending to follow in the footsteps of his father's naval career. 

David Jones' Naval Record

The rest of David's naval record fits onto one line. At 14 he was assigned to HMS Implacable, which had become the Royal Navy's first training ship at Devonport in 1855. But instead of continuing his service as planned, David was discharged on 17 Oct 1866, when he will have been just 16. The last item on the line, under the Cause of Discharge, is the abbreviation for Invalided.

There not being more detail, nor medical records we can access, we have to surmise the rest of story. That he lost a hand is not in question. Clearly, he was still in training, so there was no 'battle'. But I think that taking into consideration that this was 1866 - general anesthesia was still very much in experimental infancy - and my feeling is that the only place that such a procedure as inserting a metal pin into his wrist was likely to take place was in a military hospital and at that time there was the the former Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse. And the fact that they did this and sent him off with a pension at 16, suggests this was certainly not as the result of a boy larking about. Perhaps a faulty gun?

Former Royal Naval Hospital, High Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/6083123
The Royal Naval Hospital, East Stonehouse


Tuesday, 23 March 2021

Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman

Royal Marines' Stonehouse Barracks, Durnford Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth

And so we come to the 5th of Henry Stone and Mary Ridgeway's offspring, Tom Stone, who was born on 11 Dec 1861, in Ashbrittle, Somerset. 

In 1871, aged 9, Tom Stone was living at home with his parents and siblings in Ashbrittle. Then, aged 18, in 1880, Tom enlisted in the Royal Marines and, in 1881, aged 19, he is listed on the census as a Private R M L I - Royal Marine Light Infantry (RMLI) - at what was then called Stoke Damerel.

At 18, Tom was 5' 6¾", fair complexion, dark brown hair and hazel eyes.

Confusingly, there is a record of a marriage, in the 1st quarter of 1889, between Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman. However, according to the British Royal Marines Marriage Registers, the date they married was not until 5 Apr 1893 and they list the place of marriage as the Register Office, East Stonehouse. However, I discover that there was no such thing as a Register Office (not until after 1929), so I wonder if this took place in Stonehouse Barracks. There appear to be civil registrations for both dates too.

Either marriage was a little on the late side: 
  1. Archer Henry Stone (Archie), born 28 Mar 1889 in Plympton, Devon, bap. 21 May 1889, at the Wesleyan Methodist church, Tamerton Foliot
  2. Frederick Thomas Stone, born 20 Jan 1892
  3. Beatrice May Stone, born 14 Mar 1894, in Plympton (nothing after 1911)
  4. Bertram Charles Stone, born 24 Feb 1899 (died 2nd quarter of 1899)
  5. Leslie Victor Stone, born 1901. On 11 Apr 1919, aged 18, Leslie Victor Stone joined the Royal Tank Corps, but nothing further after that.
  6. Rosina Kathleen Stone, born 14 Apr 1903
In 1901 the family are living at 9, St Paul Street, East Stonehouse, with Tom Stone (39) listed as a Marine Pensioner. (Tom served in the Royal Marines for 21 years (+ 2 days), from 11 Mar 1880 until 13 Mar 1901, and then enlisted in the Royal Fleet Reserve on 3 Jul 1901.) Also listed were Margaret (35), along with children; Archie (12), Frederick (9), Beatrice (7) and Leslie (0). 

Archer Henry Stone enlisted in the Royal Marines, aged 14, on 11 Nov 1903.

Tom Stone, General Labourer and Marine Pensioner, died, aged 43, on 2 May 1905, from Pulmonary Tuberculosis, at 3 Ashley Place, Plymouth.

Then just two years later, on 11 Nov 1907, Archie Stone died at the Royal Naval Hospital (Medway Maritime Hospital) in Gillingham, Kent, of a Tubercle of the lung (Tuberculosis again) and cardiac failure. He was just 18.

In 1911, Margaret Stone, widowed and in receipt of Parochial Relief, was living in East Stonehouse, with her two youngest children, Leslie V (10) and Rosina K (7). Frederick had enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1907 and Beatrice (17) had also left home by then and at that time was working as a Servant for Samuel Reed, Hairdresser and Tobacconist, in Devonport.

Margaret Erne Stone died, on 1 Sep 1921, at around 55 years, and probate was granted to her son, Frederick Thomas Stone, on 24 Dec 1921.

St Paul Street, Plymouth (number 9 is the darkest caramel coloured one)
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440