Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Rookley. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rookley. Show all posts

Sunday, 22 August 2021

James Ridgeway and Thomasin Rookley

Approaching Kentismoor Farm
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Anthony Vosper - geograph.org.uk/p/4852321

James Ridgeway, eldest son of James Ridgeway and Mary Ann Lock and younger brother of my 2x great-grandmother Mary Ridgeway, married Thomasin Rookley (bap. 28 Feb 1841), daughter of John Rookley and Mary Ayres, on 12 Nov 1859, at the parish church of St. Mary’sKentisbeare

Thomasin's father, in 1851, was a Farmer of 22 acres in Kentisbeare village.

In 1861, James Ridgeway (25), Thomasin Ridgeway (20) and Samuel Rookley (4) Nephew, were living at Kentismoor [Farm], Kentisbeare. 

The only child I have been able to find of this marriage was the birth of James Ridgeway in 1866, baptised in Kentisbeare on 25 Dec 1866. He died, aged 6 months and was buried, also in Kentisbeare churchyard, on 5 May 1867.

James Ridgway (37), Thomasin Ridgeway (28), still living at the 'Moor' [Kentismoor Farm] in 1871, have Thomasin's father, John Rookley (78) still employed as a Farm Labourer, living with them. John Rookely died shortly afterwards, aged 78, and was buried on 14 May 1871.

Fields by Rhode Farm
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2129894

By 1881, James Ridgeway (45) and Thomasin Ridgeway (35), had moved to Rhode [Farm], Bradninch. Two nephews were staying with them as visitors, Walter Hartley (8) from Portsmouth and John Hartley (7) from Wales.

Bradninch: Devon Valley Mill
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/71623
Also known as Hele Mill; there has been a paper mill here since at least 1765. These buildings date from the 20th century. The brick building carries a datestone of 1912. In previous centuries several other paper mills relied on the water power of the river Culm, seen here flowing under a bridge that may have once carried a siding into the works from the nearby railway.

In 1891, James Ridgway (50) Farm Labourer and Thomasin Ridgeway (45) now working at the paper mill, were living in Hele, Bradninch.

Living in Lower Hele, Bradninch, in 1901, are James Ridgeway (68) Agricultural Labourer and Tamsin (sic) Ridgeway (60) Rag cutter in a paper mill.

Still at Lower Hele in 1911, where James Ridgway (77) and Tomassie (sic) Ridgeway (70) were both described as "Old Age Pensioner". Mary James (67) Widow of No occupation from Plymtree, was staying with them as a visitor. 
Historically, the "Old Age Pension" was introduced in 1909 in the United Kingdom (which included all of Ireland at that time). Following the passage of the Old-Age Pensions Act 1908 a pension of 5 shillings per week (25p, equivalent, using the Consumer Price Index, to £26 in present-day terms), or 7s.6d per week (equivalent to £39/week today) for a married couple, was payable to persons with an income below £21 per annum (equivalent to £2200 today), The qualifying age was 70, and the pensions were subject to a means test. 
James Ridgeway died in 1913, aged 78.

As so often happens, there's no record of Thomasin Ridgeway's death, as there was probably nobody left around who knew or cared what to register.

If you're related to any of the people written about, I'm guessing you'll recognise them from the surnames. If you are, do please get in touch.