Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Carver. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Carver. Show all posts

Wednesday, 7 July 2021

William George Beamer and Elsie May Carver

HMS Impregnable in the Hamoaze off Devonport Dockyard

William George Beamer, second son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, at age 16, in 1901, was a member of the crew of HMS Impregnable the 1st Rate (Training Ship For Boys), in the HamoazeDevonport off MakerSt Germans, Cornwall. After spending nineteen years in the reserve fleet at Devonport, HMS Impregnable became the Royal Navy's second boys' training ship at Devonport in 1862. (Regular readers might remember that my great-grandfather, David Jones, had served on the Navy's first boys' training ship, HMS Implacable).

Having signed up for a further 12 years in the Royal Navy, on 4 Feb 1903, William was discharged, invalided, on 8 Jun 1905. Then on 9 Sep 1905, he enlisted in the British Army in the Devonshire Regiment. One wonders what condition was classed as invalid for the Navy, but still fit for the Army.

Triq il-Fortizza - L-Inhawi ta' Pembroke Frank Vincentz, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, next we find William George Beamer (26), in 1911, with the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, stationed at Saint Georges Barracks, Malta. (Part of the Pembroke Army Garrison, at Pembroke, Malta, not far from St. Julian's.) (And this is the second relative I've found stationed in Malta in 1911.)

William George Beamer married Elsie May Carver at the Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity, which was located in Southside Street/Friars Lane, Barbican, Plymouth, on 17 May 1916. This church no longer exists because it was was destroyed in the Second World War and never rebuilt or replaced. 

Elsie May Carver, born on 22 Nov 1894, had been baptised on 16 Dec 1894 at Holy Trinity Church and, was the daughter of Charles Frederick Carver from Clerkenwell, London and Frances Rundle, native of Plymouth. (She was Frances Foster at the time of their marriage, so may have been a widow. If she's related to the Rundle clan in Cornwall - not a great stretch from Plymouth - then we've just gone round in yet another great big circle.) In 1911, the family, including Elsie May (16), had lived at Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street.

William George Beamer was the recipient of a Silver War Badge, having been discharged from the Machine Gun Corps on 30 Mar 1917, under King's Regulation 392 (xvi) “No longer physically fit for war service". The Silver War Badge was designed to be worn on civilian clothes after early discharge from the army. The accompanying certificate will have read, "Served with honour and was disabled in the Great War. Honourably discharged on ..."

Elsie's younger brother, Charles Frederick Carver (b. 1898), 5th (Prince of Wales's) Battalion (Territorials), Devonshire Regiment, son of Charles F. and Frances Carver, of 5, Artizan's Dwellings, Notte St., Plymouth, was killed in action on 20 Jul 1918 and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France. 

In 1939, William G Beamer, Skilled Labourer HM Dockyard, wife Elsie M Beamer and John F Carver (b. 1902), Road Repair Labourer (Elsie's brother), were still living at 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, Plymouth - buildings in that street were destroyed in the Second World War and demolished. 

William George Beamer, once more of 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, died on 1 Jan 1956 and left £605 4s 10d to his widow, Elsie May Beamer. 

Elsie May Beamer died in the 4th quarter of 1973, aged 79.