Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Webb. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Webb. Show all posts

Thursday, 17 June 2021

Alfred Blazey and Margaret Jane Webb

St Peter's Church, St.Peter's Square, Hammersmith
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Peter Trimming - geograph.org.uk/p/1790156

Alfred Blazey, the second son of Samuel Blazey and Elizabeth Wiggins, married Margaret Jane Webb (who was born in 1877 in Battersea, London), early in 1901, at St Peter's ChurchSt Peter's SquareHammersmith

At the time of the 1901 census, Alfred Blazey (32) Unemployed, and wife Margaret (24) were living at 15, Standish Road, Hammersmith.

Then, probably unsurprisingly if opportunities for them were thin on the ground in the UK, on 1 Nov 1906, Alfred and Margaret Blazey embarked, in Liverpool, on the RMS Empress of Britain, bound for Quebec, Canada.

Alfred and Margaret Blazey next surface, on the 1911 Census of Canada, in Red DeerAlberta, described as settlers. That same year, they have a son, Frank Blazey, but since Canadian birth records are not available online, I can't go any further with that, nor currently, discover if they had other children.

Margaret Blazey (52) Housewife, sails, again from Liverpool to Quebec, this time on the SS Letitia, on 19 Oct 1929, giving 10 Piggot Street, Limehouse, London as her last address in the UK. She appears to have been travelling alone.

Memorial for Alfred Blazey and Margaret Jane Webb

Alfred Blazey, Painter and Decorator, of 99 Barton Avenue, Toronto, died, aged 63, on 24 Aug 1933 and was buried, on 26 Aug 1933 at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto. Cause of death was given as Carcinoma of Stomach (Stomach cancer) with Endocarditis as a contributing factor. 

Margaret Blazey (née Webb) lived until 1962, when she will have been 85.

The death notice in The Toronto Star in 1974 the for their son Frank Blazey, mentions brothers, Art Reed, Creston, B.C. and Ernie Reed, Red Deer, Alberta and a cousin, Ernest Blazey, all of whom [for now] are complete mysteries.

PS: It really is a small world

Alfred Blazey's brother, Francis Blazey - both of them related to me as cousins of my paternal grandmother -  had ended up in the very next street to where various members of my maternal grandfather's family had lived in London's East End, which was surprising enough given that - so we thought - the two sides of my family came from very different parts of the UK and Ireland. 

That Alfred's - my paternal grandmother's cousin - final address should be little more than a ten minute drive from where my maternal grandfather's grandfather, Dan Tompson, had lived and died only nine years earlier, is astonishing.