Inherited Craziness
A place to share all the nuts found on my family tree

Showing posts with label Beamer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Beamer. Show all posts

Thursday, 8 July 2021

James Beamer and Mary Jane Snell

Old Toll House, Briton Street, Bampton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Milestone Society - geograph.org.uk/p/6114414

James Beamerson of James Beamer and Rose Anna Smith, younger brother of Alfred Beamer and half-brother of Loveday Jane Land and John Land, formed a family with Mary Jane Snell - that's the maiden name listed on several of their children's birth registrations - but [so far] I've been unable to find a record of their marriage. Mary Jane is listed as being from Plymouth. 

James and Mary Jane had at least seven children:
  1. Mary Jane Beamer born Q2 1884 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. (Died and was buried, on 13 Apr 1884, in Bampton.)
  2. Ethel Anna Beamer (no civil reg), bap. 26 Apr 1885 in Bampton.
  3. (Unnamed male child) Beamer born Q3 1886 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. (Died in the same quarter, age 0.)
  4. Sarah Jane Beamer born Q3 1887 in Tiverton, mother's name SMALE
  5. Tom Beamer born Q3 1890 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name listed as SUELL. Bap. 3 Aug 1890 in Bampton.
  6. Rosanna Beamer born Q1 1893 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name SNELL. Bap. as Rose Anna Beamer, on 30 Apr 1893, in Bampton. (Died, aged 16 months and was buried, on 22 Aug 1894, in Bampton.)
  7. Mary Ann Beamer registered Q1 1896 in Tiverton, mother's maiden name listed as SNELL. Bap. 29 Dec 1895 in Bampton. (Died in Q2 1901, aged 5. Buried on 27 Apr 1901 in Bampton.)
There could, of course, be other births that I've missed, particularly given the number of discrepancies in the information, such as the mother's maiden name, which I attribute to either errors in transcription, or registrars writing down what they heard, that the parents probably couldn't have read to check.

Ethel Ann Beamer (3) "British King" from Liverpool

This curious record appeared in my searches for this family and relates to an Ethel Ann Beamer, age 3, sailing on the "SS British King" from Liverpool, arriving in Philadelphia on 29 May 1888. Their intended destination was Chicago. Taken alone, I'd have ignored this and assumed that this was another Ethel Ann Beamer entirely. HOWEVER, in the box at the top right, it says "Accompanied by" Sarah Jane 8 months and Mary Jane 30, both of which fit. I've also found an equivalent record for Sarah Jane and both children appear on the passenger list, along with Mary Jane. It's hard to imagine them being able to afford to go to the US - and come back again - but equally hard to imagine the combination of those three names and ages cropping up together more than once. It's a mystery.

In 1891, James Beamer (39) Agricultural Labourer, wife Mary (35), Ethel A (6), Sarah J (3) and Tom (0), were living in Briton Street, Bampton

On 16 Oct 1894, James and Mary Beamer were both charged and bailed, accused of "Wilfully neglecting Rose Anna Beamer, a girl under the age of 16 years, to wit, 16 months, in a manner likely to cause unnecessary suffering and injury to health, at Bampton, on 15 August 1894, and on various other dates." They were found not guilty and acquitted. Was their crime being poor? 

In 1901, James Beamer (48) General Labourer, Mary Jane (42), Ethel (15), Tom (9) and Mary A (5), were living on the Tiverton Road, Bampton. Daughter, Sarah Jane (14), was employed as a General domestic servant, in the household of Henry Early, Watchmaker and jeweller, at 12, Angel Hill, Tiverton

Ethel Ann Beamer married William David Cappell on 24 Apr 1907, in Bampton.

Then in 1911, we find the family has "emigrated" to Wales. James Beamer (53) from Bampton, Devon is employed as a Coal miner hewer and is living at 4 Price Street, Pentre in the Rhondda Valley, Glamorganshire with Mary (49), Tom (20) also working as a Coal miner hewer; Ethel Cappell (25), William Cappell (25) Son-in-law, and grandchildren, William (3) and Ethel (1).

They returned to England, as Mary Beamer died, aged 70, in 1927 in Taunton, Somerset. Then James Beamer died, in 1931, aged 77, also in Taunton. (William and Ethel Cappell lived in Rowford, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton in 1939, but I could find no further records for Sarah Jane after 1901 or Tom after 1911.)

4 Price Street, Pentre in the Rhondda Valley

Wednesday, 7 July 2021

William George Beamer and Elsie May Carver

HMS Impregnable in the Hamoaze off Devonport Dockyard

William George Beamer, second son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, at age 16, in 1901, was a member of the crew of HMS Impregnable the 1st Rate (Training Ship For Boys), in the HamoazeDevonport off MakerSt Germans, Cornwall. After spending nineteen years in the reserve fleet at Devonport, HMS Impregnable became the Royal Navy's second boys' training ship at Devonport in 1862. (Regular readers might remember that my great-grandfather, David Jones, had served on the Navy's first boys' training ship, HMS Implacable).

Having signed up for a further 12 years in the Royal Navy, on 4 Feb 1903, William was discharged, invalided, on 8 Jun 1905. Then on 9 Sep 1905, he enlisted in the British Army in the Devonshire Regiment. One wonders what condition was classed as invalid for the Navy, but still fit for the Army.

Triq il-Fortizza - L-Inhawi ta' Pembroke Frank Vincentz, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, next we find William George Beamer (26), in 1911, with the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment, stationed at Saint Georges Barracks, Malta. (Part of the Pembroke Army Garrison, at Pembroke, Malta, not far from St. Julian's.) (And this is the second relative I've found stationed in Malta in 1911.)

William George Beamer married Elsie May Carver at the Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity, which was located in Southside Street/Friars Lane, Barbican, Plymouth, on 17 May 1916. This church no longer exists because it was was destroyed in the Second World War and never rebuilt or replaced. 

Elsie May Carver, born on 22 Nov 1894, had been baptised on 16 Dec 1894 at Holy Trinity Church and, was the daughter of Charles Frederick Carver from Clerkenwell, London and Frances Rundle, native of Plymouth. (She was Frances Foster at the time of their marriage, so may have been a widow. If she's related to the Rundle clan in Cornwall - not a great stretch from Plymouth - then we've just gone round in yet another great big circle.) In 1911, the family, including Elsie May (16), had lived at Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street.

William George Beamer was the recipient of a Silver War Badge, having been discharged from the Machine Gun Corps on 30 Mar 1917, under King's Regulation 392 (xvi) “No longer physically fit for war service". The Silver War Badge was designed to be worn on civilian clothes after early discharge from the army. The accompanying certificate will have read, "Served with honour and was disabled in the Great War. Honourably discharged on ..."

Elsie's younger brother, Charles Frederick Carver (b. 1898), 5th (Prince of Wales's) Battalion (Territorials), Devonshire Regiment, son of Charles F. and Frances Carver, of 5, Artizan's Dwellings, Notte St., Plymouth, was killed in action on 20 Jul 1918 and is buried at Marfaux British Cemetery, France. 

In 1939, William G Beamer, Skilled Labourer HM Dockyard, wife Elsie M Beamer and John F Carver (b. 1902), Road Repair Labourer (Elsie's brother), were still living at 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, Plymouth - buildings in that street were destroyed in the Second World War and demolished. 

William George Beamer, once more of 5 Artizans Dwellings, Notte Street, died on 1 Jan 1956 and left £605 4s 10d to his widow, Elsie May Beamer. 

Elsie May Beamer died in the 4th quarter of 1973, aged 79.

Tuesday, 6 July 2021

Edward Priddle and Ethel Annie Beamer

St Peter's Church, Wyndham Square, Plymouth
Plymouth's five star-rated building a select few people have been inside of
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Tom Jolliffe - geograph.org.uk/p/2342746

Ethel Annie Beamer, daughter of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Edward Priddle, Sergeant RMLI, son of James Priddle and Catherine Stevens, on 14 Oct 1905 at St Peter’s Church, Plymouth. Witnesses to their marriage were Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton, the bride's brother and his intended, who married exactly two months later in Tiverton, Devon.

Edward Priddle, born in Hackney, London on 12 Apr 1875, at 16, was employed by his father, who was a shoe maker, as a Clicker (A boot and shoe clicker is the person who cuts the uppers for boots or shoes), in Shoreditch. Edward subsequently enlisted in the Royal Marines on 27 Jan 1896 and served until 3 Mar 1918, finally attaining the rank of Lieutenant.

Edward and Ethel had three daughters, baptised at Plymouth, St Peter:
  1. Ethel Annie Priddle born 13 Jul 1906, bap. 29 Jul 1906 (died 1909, at 2)
  2. Winifred May Priddle born 4 May 1909, bap. 20 May 1909 
  3. Mary Caroline Priddle born 29 Dec 1912, bap. 2 Feb 1913
In 1911, Edward Priddle (35) Sergeant Royal Marines, Ethel Annie (28) and Winifred May (1), were living at 40 Neswick Street Plymouth.

In 1939, the family including Edward Priddle, Retired RM, Ethel A, and Ethel's widowed mother, Mary Ann Beamer were living at 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth. Winifred May Priddle was an Assistant Mistress at a Secondary School in Exeter and Mary C Hadley and her husband, John Harold Hadley (Retail Tobacconist Proprietor), were residing at 42 Chestnut Road, Plymouth.

Ethel Annie Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 12 May 1959, leaving £281 17s 9d to her husband, Edward Priddle, Retired Lieutenant RM. 

Edward Priddle, of 2 Glendower Road, Plymouth, died on 21 Jun 1962. He was 87. He left effects of £2809 11s to his two daughters, Winifred May Mayner (m. 1959) and Mary Caroline Tomkins (m. 1951). 

Thursday, 1 July 2021

Alfred Beamer and Emily Luxton

St Paul Street and St Paul's Church, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/3417969

Alfred Beamer, Private RMLI of Cecil Street, Plymouth, son of Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White, married Emily Luxton (b. 22 Jun 1882, bap. 9 Jul 1882, at St Peter’s Church Tiverton), daughter of James Luxton and Anna Maria Hawkins, on 14 Dec 1905, at St Paul's Church, Tiverton. Emily's address at the time of the marriage was Heathcoat Square, Tiverton. Emily's younger sister, Jessie Luxton, was one of the witnesses (bridesmaid perhaps).

Emily's father, Sergeant James Luxton (b. 1841 in Taunton, Somerset), had served in the British Army for 13 years, 320 days, with the 10th Reg Of Foot between 1860 and 1874. He spent over nine years serving abroad in the Cape of Good Hope, St Helena, Japan, China and the Straits Settlements. He was discharged in 1874 as he had been found unfit for further service. On the 1881 census, James Luxton (40), described himself as Grocer (Chelsea Pensioner) in Bampton Street, Tiverton. James Luxton died in 1886, aged just 45.

In 1891, Emily lived in Sewards Court, Leat Street, Tiverton, where her widowed mother worked as a silk lace mender and all of her older siblings worked at the lace factory (Heathcoat Lace Factory, Tiverton, Devon) - her brother Arthur being a machine boy there already at age 10. By 1901, Emily and her younger sister, Jessie, had become silk winders, working at the lace factory too.

Former workers' housing, Heathcoat Square, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk/p/6690635

Alfred and Emily's son, Alfred James, was born on 15 Mar 1908 and baptised on 29 Mar 1908 at St Peter’s Church, Stonehouse, Plymouth. But the infant died, in the third quarter of 1908, having bearly reached six months of age.

Alfred Beamer, who had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 15 Aug 1896, just shy of his 16th birthday, was discharged, invalided, on 15 Oct 1908. On 7 Mar 1909, Alfred Beamer (29) Labourer of 40 Neswick St, Plymouth, was admitted to the Devon and Cornwall Sanatorium for Consumptives Didworthy

Consumption was another name for Tuberculosis. The record shows that Alfred had first developed the disease 7 months previously - which ties in with the date he was discharged from the Royal Marines - when he was discharged from the sanitorium on 15 Jun 1909. In the notes it says, "light work - dead".

Such a concession! What kind of light work can the dead do, FFS? 

By 1911, Emily Beamer (28), widow, had returned to Tiverton, at 1 Melbourne Street and was again working at the Heathcoat Lace Factory, as a spinner.

In the 4th quarter of 1912, Emily Beamer remarried to a John Heard, in Tiverton. The couple don't appear to have any children. I've not been able to identify when John Heard died, but by 1939, Emily had been widowed again and was living with a single lady, Beatrice E Gollop, at 26 Castle Street, Tiverton

Emily Heard died, in Tiverton, in 1962, aged 79.

Castle Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Cornfoot - geograph.org.uk/p/6587133

Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Alfred Beamer and Mary Ann White

Adelaide Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Stephen Richards - geograph.org.uk/p/6083118

Alfred Beamer, son of James Beamer and Rose Anna Smith and half-brother of Loveday Jane Land and John Land, married Mary Ann White (b. 1851), daughter of Alfred Augustus Harker White and Mary Sorton, on 23 Nov 1879 at Saint George's Church, Stonehouse (bombed in the Second World War). Alfred Beamer's rank or profession was listed as Private RM. Alfred Beamer, born 29 Dec 1853, had enlisted in the Royal Marines on 29 Dec 1871.

Alfred and Mary Ann had five children:
  1. Alfred Beamer born 28 Aug 1880 in East Stonehouse [a]
  2. Ethel Annie Beamer born 23 Feb 1883 in East Stonehouse [a]
  3. William George Beamer born 4 Jan 1886 in East Stonehouse [a]
  4. Rosa May Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 in Tiverton [b] (nothing after 1911)
  5. Frederick John Beamer born 7 Jan 1893 (died 1896, aged 3) in Tiverton [b]
In 1881, Mary A Beamer (29), Marines Wife, was living at 47, Adelaide Street, East Stonehouse, with son Alfred (0) and her sister Mary J White (19). Mary Ann, who's mother was named Mary, and her mother before her was also Mary (her parents even married, on 15 December 1850, when Mary Sorton was a minor (19), at St Mary’s Church Plympton) had a younger sister, Mary Jane!

[a] Alfred, Ethel Annie and William George were all baptised, on 19 Jan 1886, at the Anglican Church of Saint Matthew, which was located in Clarence Place, opposite the former Royal Naval Hospital at East Stonehouse, Plymouth.

Again in 1891, Mary A Beamer (38) was listed as the head of the household "Supported by husband", with children: Alfred (10), Ethel A (8) and William G (5), living at Union Place, East Stonehouse.

Alfred completed 21 years service in the Royal Marines, with a final date of 6 Jan 1893, however, both William George and Ethel Annie were registered in the National School Admission Registers at Halberton in Nov 1892.

[b] Registered as Rosa May, this twin was baptised Rosa Mary, when she and Frederick John were both baptised, "privately" (does this mean a house call?) on the same day they were born, 7 Jan 1893, in Halberton. Their address at this time was Valley House, Halberton and Alfred was employed as a labourer.


In 1901, they were back in Plymouth at 19, Cecil Street, Stonehouse, with Alfred Beamer (46), Labourer at Victualling Yard, wife Mary (49) and their two daughters, Ettie (Ethel) (18) and Rosa (8). Son Alfred was away, having joined the Royal Marines, while William was away training in the Royal Navy.

And in 1911, at 40 Neswick Street, Stonehouse, Plymouth, are Alfred Beamer (57) Pensioner Royal Marine Labourer Royal William Victualling Yard, wife Mary Ann (59), Rose May (18) and Mary Jane White (51), Mary Ann's sister.

In 1939, Mary Ann, widow, was living with her married daughter, Ethel Priddle. So far, I've been unable to find a record of Alfred Beamer's death. There are no records beyond 1911 for daughter, Rosa May either.

Mary Ann Beamer of 2 Glendower Road, Peverell, Plymouth, died on 17 May 1950. She was aged 99. A notice of her death had appeared in the Western Morning News on 19 May 1950 and Mary Ann was buried, on 20 May 1950, at The Parish Church of St Gabriel, Peverell Terrace, Peverell, Plymouth. 

Tuesday, 29 June 2021

James Land and Rose Anna Beamer

Church of St Michael and All Angels, Bampton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Rob Purvis - geograph.org.uk/p/6807505

James Land, widower, married Rose Anna Beamer, widow, on 19 Apr 1863 at the Parish Church of St Michael and All Angels in Bampton, Devon. 

James Land (b. 1828) was the son of John Land, Labourer, and in 1841, aged 13, was in his father's household at Gate Street, West, Bampton. His mother's given name was Loveday, born 1804 in Rackenford, Devon. I haven't been able to find a record of his parents' marriage, but the only relevant baptism that year in Rackenford, is for a Loveday Flew. If correct, this is the same Flew family of Rackenford that my 2x great-grandmother, Jane Middleton, married into. 

In 1851, James (23) was still at home, unmarried. But by 1861, James (32) was living as a Lodger in the household of Ann Beamer (38) from Norton, Somerset, along with four of her children: Mary (10), Alfred (8), James (6) and Lindy (2). 

The only one of those children for whom I can find a civil registration is James Beamer in 1855, which confirms that Rose Anna's maiden name was Smith. 

At the time of her marriage to James Land, Rose Anna Beamer had given her father's name as Isaac Smith, Labourer. I've found a record of a baptism on 1 Feb 1824 for a Mary Smith, daughter of Isaac and Hannah Smith at All Saints, Norton Fitzwarren, who may have been her sister.

James Land, therefore, must have been both married and widowed between the 1851 and 1861 censuses. There is a marriage of a James Land to a Jane Flew in 1854 and the death of a Jane Land, aged 30, in 1856, which, by process of elimination, looks like it might relate. They were probably cousins. 

Yes, the family tree of my Devon ancestors would be in the form of a circle. Or as 'him indoors' says, a very complicated monkey puzzle tree! LOL

Beamer is a surname found in Clayhanger right back to the 1600s and probably still. In 1851 there was a James Beamer (58), who's a likely in-law.

With a two year old in 1861, one might assume that Rose Anna (Ann) had only fairly recently been widowed, but the only record of a death that may potentially be that of her husband - I haven't [yet] been able to find a record of this earlier marriage, but son Alfred Beamer's marriage gives his father's name as James Beamer - is that for a James Beamer, aged 37, in the last quarter of 1854. That would make James Beamer, born 1855, a posthumous child. Although, it would make Lindy Beamer the child of another liaison. Not exactly unheard of. 

John and Rose Anna had at least three further children together: 
  1. George Land Beamer born Q4 1862 (died Q1 1863, aged 0)
  2. Loveday Jane Land born 1864, in Bampton, Devon
  3. John Land born 3 Feb 1866, in Stoodleigh, Devon
John Land, aged approximately 90, died in 1866. This age would fit with James' father and would explain why he named his son John in the same quarter.

In 1871, in High Street, Bampton, we find James Land (41) and Rosannah (46), with just Loveday J (7) and John (5). Not one of Rose Anna's previous family are living with their mother. It's not the first time I've seen a first family "disappear" when their parent remarries either. Rose Anna's daughter, Mary (b. 1850), I've been unable to find any further mention of; Alfred Bimmer (sic) (19) was working as a [Farm] Servant for Thomas Chave in Morebath; James Beamer (16) Masons Labourer was lodging, with Henry Beamer (21) Ag Lab, elsewhere in Bampton; there are no other records at all of Lindy Beamer (b. 1859).

In 1881, at Westbrook Cottage, Bampton, at a guess, on Westbrook Farm (PDF), were James Land (54) Ag Lab; Ann Land (58); Jane Land (18) Domestic (Out of Service) - just given birth; John Land (16) Gen Labourer; Henry Beames (sic) (8) Grandson and Rosana Land (0) Granddaughter. 

Loveday Jane Land married Frederick James Stone on 10 Oct 1881.

James Land died, aged 56, in the first quarter of 1884.

There is a death of a Rose Anne Land in 1889, with her age estimated as 40. This would be a 20 year discrepancy, if typical lie about a woman's age. 

Entrance, Fort Stamford
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/5626178

In 1891, John Land (24) was a Private in the Royal Marines Light Infantry at Fort StamfordPlymstock, Devon. He enlisted on 3 Jan 1885, served for 21 years until Jan 1906 and then again in 1914-15. That latter period, mostly, at Plymouth Division, but from 12 Sep - 3 Dec 1914, on HMS Jupiter
When World War I broke out in August 1914, Jupiter was transferred to the 7th Battle Squadron of the Channel Fleet. During this service, she covered the passage of the British Expeditionary Force from England to France in September 1914. In late October 1914, Jupiter was reassigned to serve alongside her sister ship Majestic as a guard ship at the Nore. On 3 November 1914, Jupiter and Majestic left the Nore and relieved their sister ships Hannibal and Magnificent of guard ship duty on the Humber. In December 1914, Jupiter moved on to guard ship duty on the Tyne.
Interestingly, on his Marines Record, John describes his sister Loveday Jane's daughter, Rose Anna Southwood (née Land) as his sister, whereas she was his niece. This might suggest that the illegitimate child was brought up by her grandparents long enough for him to consider her as such.

In 1911, John Land (45) Horse Man on Farm had been boarding with his niece (who he considered a sister) Rose Anna (30) and her husband, William Henry Southwood (34) at Chieflowman Cottage, Uplowman.

John does not marry and I cannot be sure of when he died.