Saturday, 31 July 2021

William Henry Middleton and Alice Maud Osmond

Admiralty Mews, Deal
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Philip Halling - geograph.org.uk/p/1407334

William Henry Middleton
, son of Emma Middleton, married Alice Maud Osmond, in Tiverton, on 21 Sep 1918. Alice Maud, known as Maud, born 2 Nov 1888, bap. 23 Dec 1888 at St. Mary, Willand, was the daughter of John Osmond (son of Henry Osmond from Halberton) and Annie Osmond (daughter of John Osmond of Willand) - it's likely her parents were cousins.

In 1891, John Osmond (29), Annie (34) lived in a cottage in Kentisbeare, Devon along with daughters Alice M (2) and Emily M (0). At that time, William Henry (2) was living with his grandmother, Jane How at Habridge Cottages, Steart Road, Stoodleigh, Tiverton.

By 1901, however, when Maud (13) was still at home with her family, then living at 1, Crosslands [Cottages], Halberton, William Henry (13) had already left home and was employed as an Agricultural Labourer by John Hussey (38) Farmer at Wood & Honeyland, Tiverton. (Honeyland Plantation?)

William Henry "Bill" Middleton, born 10 Dec 1889, then enrolled in the Royal Marines on 4 Nov 1907, at Exeter (his record says was underage between then and 9 Dec 1907), and was sent off to the Royal Marine Depot, Deal, until 2 Oct 1908, before being sent to Plymouth Division. William Henry was promoted to Corporal in 1911, and Sergeant in 1916 while serving on HMS Roxburgh (1904), which he was with from 4 Jun 1912 until 13 Aug 1916 - she was hit by a torpedo on 20 Jun 1915 but escaped with serious damage to her bow - latterly at the North America and West Indies Station.

From 13 Apr 1917 until 26 Nov 1918, Bill was with HMS Highflyer (1898), which means that he was present in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the Halifax Explosion on 6 Dec 1917. "Royal Navy cruisers in port sent some of the first organized rescue parties ashore. HMS Highflyer, along with the armed merchant cruisers HMS Changuinola, HMS Knight Templar and HMS Calgarian, sent boats ashore with rescue parties and medical personnel and soon began to take wounded aboard."

From 27 Nov 1918, Bill was transferred back to Plymouth Division, with a brief sojourn at HMS Excellent (shore establishment) near Portsmouth on 23 Dec 1918, but was Invalided on 25 Sep 1919. Whilst I don't know the nature, I can only surmise it may have been as a result of effects of the Halifax blast.

Remarks on his marine's record say, "Has a good knowledge of semaphore ..."

In 1939, William H Middleton, Road Chargeman for Devon County Council, and wife Alice Maud were living at Trickey Cottage, Ash Thomas, Devon. Lodging with them was Frederick H Kerslake (20) Railway Clerk. He was their nephew, son of Maud's sister Emily and her husband, Frederick James Kerslake.

Bill and Maud didn't have any children, for what reason I'm unaware, but they did have a cat named "Stripy" (a tabby, obviously), who, I was told, used to drink milk out of a jug on the windowsill, by dipping his paw in the jug (like Arthur from the Kattomeat ad). In our family, if you cleaned your plate at the end of a meal, someone would exclaim, "Poor old Stripy!", intimating that the poor cat, fed on scraps, would therefore go without. I only hope this was in jest!

Bill Middleton died in 1967, aged 78. Alice Maud Middleton of Tidcombe Hall, Tiverton, died on 21 Sep 1982, only a few weeks short of her 94th birthday. 

Tiverton : Tidcombe Hall
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/6337380
Early 19th century house, shown as Tidcombe Rectory on late 19th century Ordnance Survey map. Much altered in late 20th century. The building was also once a Marie Curie daycare unit.

Friday, 30 July 2021

George Burt and Fanny Jerwood

Tiverton : St Peter's Church
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Lewis Clarke - geograph.org.uk/p/1654824

George Burt married Fanny Jerwood on 25 Dec 1884 at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. George Burt's Rank or Profession was given as Sailor. Fanny Jerwood was the daughter of John Jerwood (b. 1830), Labourer and his wife Sarah Davey (who had also married at St Peter's on 31 May 1853). George Burt's father is listed on the marriage certificate as William Burt, Labourer, however, this looks like an error as records suggest George's father was Edward Burt. As his father had died when George was two, he would never have known him.

On 26 Nov 1837, Edward Burt (b. 1816), son of Richard Burt, had married Mary Ann Prescott (b. 1821), daughter of John Prescott and Ann Warren, also at St Peter's Church, Tiverton. In 1841 they were living in Bampton Street, Tiverton with son George Burt (b. 1840). By 1851, Edward Burt (34) Labourer and Mary Ann (30), had added Edward (b. 1842), John (b. 1846), Richard (b. 1848) and William (b. 1851). Living with them was Mary Carter (71) Lodger. 

In 1859, the son George born in 1840, died, aged 19.

George Burt, born 1863, was actually registered as Sidney George Burt.

Their father, Edward Burt, then died, in 1866, in Tiverton, aged 50. 

In 1870, listed simply as George Burt (Sidney is never used again), son of a widow from Bampton Street, he was registered at Heathcote School.

In 1871, Mary Ann Burt (50) Widow, Seamstress, was still living in Bampton Street with her children: John (25) Mason's Labourer, Lucy (19) Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory, Charlotte (17) Laundress, James (11) and George (7), both at School. Emily Peters (19) also Lace Hand in Tiverton Factory and her son Berty Peters (2) were Lodging with them. Mary Ann Burt died in 1877, aged 56.

And so, George Burt, born 4 Nov 1863, enlisted in the Royal Navy, at 15, as a Boy 2nd Class on 8 Apr 1879. He served until 1 Nov 1901 and joined the Royal Fleet Reserve on 18 Aug 1902. He was brought back into service on 2 Aug 1914 until 18 Jul 1917, although at shore establishments HMS Vivid (II and III). 

HMS Superb (1875)

In 1881, George Burt (17) Boy 1st Class was with the 1st Class Iron Screw Ship HMS Superb (1875), moored in Valletta (Grand Harbour), Malta.

George and Fanny's only child, Charles Edward Burt, was born on 4 Dec 1887.

In 1891, Fanny Burt (27) with son Charlie (3), were living at 150 Pembroke Street, Devonport, while George was with HMS Amphion (1883) in the Pacific.

Young Charlie was then enrolled at Heathcote School in 1894 and at that time, his mother's address was Melbourne Street, Tiverton, even though George was predominantly in Devonport in 1894, first with HMS Himalaya (1854) and then at HMS Vivid II, joining HMS Grafton (1892) on 23 Oct 1894.

In 1901, George Burt (38), now a Leading Stoker, was again at HMS Vivid II, before being pensioned on 1 Nov that year. Fanny (37) was living at 2, Wellbrook Street, Prospect Place, Tiverton, with Charles (13) now a Silk lace maker and Sarah Jerwood (70) Widow, Boarder (Fanny's mother.)

Sarah Jerwood having died in 1910, in 1911, George Burt (48) Grocer and dealer, wife Fanny (47) Assisting in the business and son Charles Edward Burt (23) Lace machine hand, were living at 24 Wellbrook St, Tiverton.

George Burt died in Tiverton in 1937, aged 73.

Fanny Burt died in 1938, aged 74.

Tiverton: Wellbrook Street
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/1993212

James Ridgeway and Evelyn Laura

Uplowman: the Lowman at Stagg Mill Cross
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Martin Bodman - geograph.org.uk/p/148279

James Ridgway (b. 10 Feb 1904), son of James Ridgeway and Harriet Stone, in 1939, was a Farm Carter, living at Rose Cottage, Stag Mill, Uplowman with his wife listed as Evelyn S (b. 30 Jul 1901). So far, I've been unable to find a record of their marriage or Evelyn's maiden name. Evelyn Laura Ridgway or Ridgeway, married woman, of Rose Cottage, Stag Mill, Uplowman, died at Tidcombe Hall, Tiverton, on 1 Oct 1960, aged 59, leaving her effects to Charles Edwin Howden, retired postman [was he a relative?]. James Ridgeway died in 1976. 

(Alice Maud Middleton had also died at Tidcombe Hall (in 1982). The Early 19th century house, shown as Tidcombe Rectory on late 19th century Ordnance Survey map, was also once a Marie Curie daycare unit.)

Charles Ridgeway and Alice Conibeer

Old and new houses in Copplestone near Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Smith - geograph.org.uk/p/1340150

In 1922, Charles Ridgway (b. 3 Mar 1895), son of James Ridgeway and Harriet Stone, married Alice Conibeer (b. 7 Apr 1890) and in 1939, Charles Ridgeway, Lorry Driver, and his wife Alice, were living at Copplestone Cottage, West Manley, TivertonAlice Ridgway died in 1949, aged 59. Charles Ridgway died on 19 May 1958, aged 63, leaving his effects to his sister, Nellie Burt.

Undoubtedly, Copplestone Cottage belonged to Copplestone Farm, West Manley, about which we learn, "The site formed part of the Manor of Tiverton, granted in the 13th century to the alien Priory of St James in Exeter. The lands of that priory were seized by Henry VI and granted to King's College Cambridge, who held them until 1926. The tenements of Copplestone and Sellake were named for 17th and 18th century tenants; Copplestone survives, but the farmhouse at Sellake was lost between 1926 and 1934." 

(Several family members have been found at Sellake.)

Charles Edward Burt and Nellie Ridgway

Queen Street, Tiverton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Dave Hunt - geograph.org.uk/p/3352764

Nellie Ridgway, daughter of James Ridgeway and Harriet Stone, married Charles Edward Burt, son of George Burt and Fanny Jerwood, in Tiverton, in 1925.

Charles and Nellie had three children:
  1. Betty Burt born 1926. Married Walter H Mullins in 1944.
  2. Georgina Joan Burt born 18 Nov 1927. Married Charles Desmond Theodore Bird (b. 27 Jun 1920) in 1957. Charles Desmond T Bird died in 1976, in Tiverton. Georgina Joan Bird died in 1997, in Mid Devon.
  3. Charles George Burt born 31 Dec 1929. Married Kathleen Joyce King (b. 1924) in 1955. Charles George Burt died, in Mid Devon, in 2003, aged 73. Kathleen Joyce Burt died on 4 May 2012, aged 88.
In 1939, Charles Burt (b. 4 Dec 1887) Lacemaker Machinist, wife Nellie and their three children, were living at 5 Queen StreetTiverton, Devon.

Charles Edward Burt died, in 1965, in Tiverton, aged 77.

Nellie Burt died in 1976, in Exeter.

Thursday, 29 July 2021

Herbert William Proudlock and Dorothy May Shilcock

Paddington Station
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Malc McDonald - geograph.org.uk/p/5120568

Herbert William Proudlock and Dorothy May Shilcock married, in Portsmouth, in 1922. Herbert William Proudlock's birth was registered in Paddington, London, in 1896. There's no mother's maiden name on the registration, so we must assume that his was an illegitimate birth. But, similarly, it hasn't been possible, without the certificate, to even identify his mother. There's no obvious Miss Proudlock born or living locally, so from what I can find out about him, he may well have been found on said station and have a penchant for marmalade.

In 1911, H W Proudlock (14) from Paddington, London, turns up in the household of a F W Rackley (38) General Labourer, at Westborough Road, Maidenhead, Bisham Bray, Berkshire, described as a Foster Son, but employed as a Page Boy. Not surprising then that he goes to sea. 

Herbert William Proudlock (b. 30 Apr 1896) enlisted in the Royal Navy, aged 15, on 9 Feb 1912. On his naval record, his previous occupation, "House Boy" was later crossed out and expressed as Domestic Servant. On 30 Apr 1914, his 18th birthday, he signed up for a further 12 years and spent the First World War doing short tours on a wide variety of ships. On 29 Apr 1936, Herbert was Pensioned. Then on 1 Apr 1938 - no kidding - he was brought back into service again, served through World War II, being finally released on 17 Sep 1945.

Dorothy May Shilcock, meanwhile, was the daughter of Alfred Eli Shilcock and Florence Ada Poat, who married at St Mary's Church, Portsea, on 6 Nov 1902. Dorothy May Shilcock, born 2 Oct 1901, was baptised on 27 Sep 1908 at St Bartholomew's Church, Southsea (no longer standing?), along with her sister Rosa Louisa and brother Alfred Eli, who had been born on 10 Aug 1908. In 1911, the family, living at 3 Addison Road Southsea, Portsmouth, consisted Alfred Shilcock (38) Engine Fitter, Florence (31), Dorothy (9), Rosa (7), Doris (5), Alfred (2) and Ernest (0). (Although they listed the boys first.)

Herbert and Dorothy had three sons:
  1. Frederick William Eli Proudlock b. 5 Nov 1923
  2. Stanley Victor Proudlock b. 25 Dec 1928
  3. (Further son born 1934 may be still living)
In 1939, Dorothy M Proudlock was living at 75 Lovett Road, Portsmouth with her three sons, while her husband was at sea. Frederick had become a Shop Assistant at a Pawnbroker. (Frederick died, in Portsmouth, in 1997).

Herbert William Proudlock of 34 St. Chad's Avenue, North End, Portsmouth, died on 19 Feb 1970. Dorothy May Proudlock died on 20 Jul 1974.

Wednesday, 28 July 2021

Stanley Victor Proudlock and Theresa Margaret Clancy

Downtown Orangeville Municipal Affairs and Housing, CC BY 2.0

In 1951, Theresa Margaret Clancy, daughter of Patrick Michael Clancy and Rosina Kathleen Stone, married Stanley Victor Proudlock (b. 25 Dec 1928), son of Herbert William Proudlock and Dorothy May Shilcock, in Portsmouth. This couple had twins in 1953 (and later, a daughter) and and on 14 May 1954, Stanley V Proudlock (25) a Riveter of 87 Eastney Caravan Site, Portsmouth embarked in Southampton on Cunard's RMS Samaria, bound for Quebec, Canada. On 11 Jun 1954, Theresa Proudlock (26) and their two 8 month old sons followed, also on RMS Samaria, from Southampton. 

Theresa Margaret Proudlock (née Clancy), "passed away peacefully at home with family by her side on Thursday, September 25, 2014 at the age of 87." [Source

Stanley Victor Proudlock died on 8 May 2015. They are buried together at Forest Lawn CemeteryOrangeville, Ontario, Canada.

Patrick Michael Clancy and Rosina Kathleen Stone

Looking towards the chapel at Milton Cemetery, Portsmouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Basher Eyre - geograph.org.uk/p/1070654

Rosina Kathleen Stone, youngest child of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, sister of Frederick Thomas Stone, married Patrick Michael Clancy (b. 16 Sep 1904), son of Patrick Michael Clancy and Elizabeth Flynn, in Plymouth, in 1926. 

In 1901, the bridegroom's father, Patrick Michael Clancy (25), Stoker, from Whitegate, County Cork, was aboard HMS Renard (1892) (an Alarm-class torpedo gunboat), in Devonport, while his wife Lizzie Clancy (27) was boarding at 14, Second Avenue, Devonport along with her two eldest children, Julia Kathleen Clancy (b. 1899) and Mary Elizabeth Clancy (b. 1901).

None of the Clancy family turn up anywhere in the records of 1911.

Patrick Michael Clancy had joined the Royal Navy on 16 Mar 1920, when he was aged 15, as a Boy 2nd Class, he became an Able Seaman on his 18th birthday, 16 Sep 1922, and a Leading seaman by the time of his marriage.

Patrick and Rosina had two children:
  1. Theresa Margaret Clancy born 28 Aug 1927, in Devonport
  2. Patrick Michael Clancy born 1929, in Portsmouth
Yet again, this family seemingly evade the 1939 Register. However, on 1 Sep 1939, Patrick was assigned to HMS Renown, with which he stayed for more than three years. On 10 Mar 1944, he was promoted to Chief Petty Officer and assigned to HMS Cyclops. Patrick Michael Clancy was invalided in June 1945 at Royal Naval Auxiliary Hospital, Southport. He died on 18 July 1946, aged 41, presumably as a result of injuries sustainedChief Petty Officer Patrick Michael Clancy, Son of Patrick Michael and Elizabeth Clancy; husband of Rosina Kathleen Clancy, of Paulsgrove, Portsmouth, is buried in Portsmouth (Milton) Cemetery, Plot M. Row 17. Grave 55.

Then Patrick Michael Clancy, son of Mrs. R. K. Clancy, of Milton, Portsmouth, Constable in the Palestine Police Force, died, on 4 Jun 1947, aged 18. He was buried at Haifa (Sharon) British Civil CemeteryHaifaIsrael, Plot 4. Grave 6.

Both father and son's gravestones are united by the same inscription:
 
"IN THE SHELTER OF THY SACRED HEART, DEAR JESUS, MAY HE REST".

In 1951, Rosina K Clancy remarried, in Portsmouth, to a Cyril West. 

Rosina Kathleen West died in 1979, aged 76, back in her native Plymouth.

Monday, 26 July 2021

Anthony Charles Mullarkey and Mabel Sarah E Manley

Central Terrace
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger W Haworth - geograph.org.uk/p/333311
Central Terrace: built as Police Quarters for those guarding the depot at Chattenden

Anthony Charles Mullarkey, second son of Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, married Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Manley (b. 16 Jan 1904), the daughter of William Manley and Jessie Hammacott, in Devonport, in 1926. 

They had one child, Barbara May Mullarkey, born in 1929, in Devonport.

HMS Centurion closeup 1918 | HMS Centurion Crew List

Anthony Charles Mullarkey had joined the Royal Marines as a Bugler at around 14½ on 18 Sep 1907, becoming a Private when he turned 18 in 1911. On 22 May 1913, he was assigned to HMS Centurion (1911), with which he stayed until 10 May 1919, which means, that on 31 May - 1 Jun 1916, Anthony also took part in the Battle of Jutland, as had his elder brother, John Martin Mullarkey. (And his future father-in-law, William Manley.)

Anthony left the Royal Marines on 11 Jan 1932. However, in 1939, Anthony Charles Mullarkey, Royal Marine Police and wife - listed as Mabel on census returns and the 1939 Register, but on Anthony's Royal Marines' record as Sarah, so was presumably known by her second name in the family - were living at No 3 Central Terrace, Chattenden, Upper Upnor, Kent. Central Terrace was built as Police Quarters for those guarding the depot at Chattenden.

Barbara May Mullarkey (1929-2008) married Ronald Stephen Lyons (1927-2014), in Chatham, in 1947. They had three children between 1947 and 1952. 

Anthony Charles Mullarkey, his service record shows, was discharged dead from the Royal Marines Police on 23 Jan 1968. He will have been 75, so I assume he was still engaged as something like a watchman. His Royal Marines and Royal Marines Police service put together add up to a total of 61 years. This surely has to be some sort of record? He is buried at Hoo St Werburgh.

Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Mullarkey of The Elms, 77 Main Road, Hoo, Kent (Residential Home), died on 27 Nov 1990, aged 86. 

The Parish Church of St Werburgh, Hoo
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Ifor R Griffiths - geograph.org.uk/p/267759

Friday, 23 July 2021

Cyril Burrows and Lilian May Manley

Devonport Dockyard - the ropewalk
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Chris Allen - geograph.org.uk/p/3074721

Lilian May Manly, daughter of William Manley and Jessie Hammacott, married Cyril Burrows, son of Henry Burrows and Mary Cock, in Devonport in 1921.

Cyril's parents had married, in Bodmin, in 1895. Mary Cock, daughter of Johnathan Cock and Mary Phillips, was baptised on 21 Aug 1871, in Luxulyan, Cornwall. Henry Burrows, born 13 Dec 1873, was a Blacksmith, listed as born in Whitehouse, Bodmin, Cornwall. Henry Burrows joined the Royal Navy as an Armourer on 19 Apr 1893. Exactly the same career path as Lilian's father.

On 9 Mar 1898, until 15 Dec 1899, Henry Burrows was assigned to HMS Hibernia (1804). Hibernia was flagship of the British Mediterranean Fleet from 1816 until 1855, then she became the flagship for the Royal Navy's base at Malta, stationed in Grand Harbour. On the English 1911 Census, Cyril Burrows is listed as "Malta Resident". What they mean is, he was born in Malta

In 1901, the family were living at 64, Admiralty Street, Devonport, but in 1911, while Mary and the children were residing at 9 Highland Terrace, St Budeaux, Devonport, Henry Burrows was with HMS Monmouth (1901), of the China Squadron, at Colombo (Ceylon, now Sri Lanka). 

Henry Burrows was Invalided on 13 Apr 1916 with the reason given as paralysis agitans, a less common name for Parkinson's disease

In 1939, we find Cyril Burrows (b. 2 May 1899) Inspector Of Shipwrights, with wife Lilian and son Cyril Maynard Burrows (b. 24 Apr 1921) Apprentice Shipwright, living at 35 Oakwood Road, Portsmouth. Cyril's Admiralty appointment was reported in the Portsmouth Evening News of 21 July 1939.

Cyril Burrows died, in Portsmouth, in 1979, aged 80.

Lilian May Burrows died, in Portsmouth, in 1989, at 90.

Cyril Maynard Burrows died, also in Portsmouth, in 2001, also aged 80.

William Manley and Jessie Hammacott

Mary Street, Bovey Tracey
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Smith - geograph.org.uk/p/6543679

William Manley married Jessie Hammacott, in Devonport in the 3rd quarter of 1900. William Manley (b. 29 Nov 1869) in Bovey Tracey, Devon, lived in Mary Street, Bovey Tracey with his parents, Joseph Manley and Elizabeth Taylor Williams. Jessie Hammacott (b. 1872) meanwhile, was the daughter of John Hammacott and Sarah Trebble, and hailed from Chudleigh.

In 1891, William (21) was employed as a Blacksmith. William Manley joined the Royal Navy on 22 Aug 1891 and he and Jessie married just before William joined HMS Phaeton on which he served from Oct 1900 to 28 Apr 1903:

Phaeton was re-commissioned at Esquimalt (Canada) on 10 October 1900 by Captain Ernest James Fleet, to serve on the Pacific Station. In July 1902 she visited Acapulco, and most of the Autumn of that year she was at Panama. She paid off on 28 April 1903. This commission was the subject of a book in the 'Log' series, entitled: HMS Phaeton, Pacific Station, 1900–1903.
William and Jessie had six children:
  1. William Henry Manley b. 13 Sep 1897. William Henry Manley married Rose Evelyn Georgina Ide (b. 2 Jan 1897) at St Mark's church, Ford, Plymouth, on 20 Apr 1922. In 1939, William and Rose were living at 4 Stirling Rd, St Budeaux, Plymouth. William Henry Manley died in 1990, at 93. Rose Evelyn Georgina Manley died on 19 Oct 1993, at 96.
  2. Lilian May Manley b. 2 Mar 1899
  3. Mabel Sarah Elizabeth Manley b. 16 Jan 1904
  4. Sidney Manley b. 1910 (nothing after 1911 Census)
  5. Ronald Manley b. 23 Apr 1912. Ronald Manley married Lilian Annie Richards at The Anglican Church of Saint Boniface on 5 Oct 1935. In 1939, Ronald Manley, Fitter's Labourer Dockyard and wife Lilian were living at 16 Warleigh Avenue, Plymouth, along with Lilian's sister, Vera, Shorthand Typist RN Barracks. I can only assume that they must have divorced, as Lilian A Manley married Henry R Adams in 1946. Ronald Manley died in 1973. Lilian Annie Adams died on 13 Sep 2012, at the age of 97.
  6. Dorothy Manley b. 1914 (died 1916, aged 1)
In 1901, Jessie Manley (28) Wife of an armourer was living with their two oldest children at 28, Victory Street, East Devonport

On the 1911 Census, William Manley (41) has his occupation described as Chief armourer Royal Navy and is living with wife, Jessie (38) and children, William Henry (13), Lilian May (12), Mabel Sarah (7), Sidney (0) and William's widowed mother, Elizabeth Manley (72), at 67 Renown Street, East Devonport.

HMS Conqueror in 1912

On 28 Nov 1912, William Manley was assigned to HMS Conqueror and stayed with her through to 6 Mar 1919, which means that on 31 May - 1 Jun 1916, William Manley took part in the Battle of Jutland.

William Manley retired from the Royal Navy on 17 Jun 1922.

Jessie Manley died in the 2nd quarter of 1926, aged 54.

William Manley died in 1947, aged 77.

Wednesday, 21 July 2021

John Martin Mullarkey and Elsie Aitchinson

Church of St Jude, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/5813993

John Martin Mullarkey, son of Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, married Elsie Aitchinson (b. 7 Feb 1890), daughter of John George Aitchinson and Emma Bolt, at St Jude's Church, Plymouth on 9 Jul 1918.

Elsie's parents had married, on 29 Jun 1885, at Charles Church, Plymouth. John George Aitchinson of 16 Guldford Street, Plymouth was a Shipwright, son of John George Aitchinson, Petty Officer RN. Emma Bolt was from a few doors down at 10 Guildford Street and her father, John Bolt, was a Shoemaker.

Elsie was baptised, as an adult, on 19 Nov 1905, at Charles Church, Plymouth.

In 1911, the family was living at 59 Knighton Road, Plymouth, with John George Aitchinson (50) employed as a Shipwright at H M Dockyard, wife Emma (52) and both Elsie (21) and her younger sister Lilian (17) described as Tailorists.

John Martin Mullarkey (20) had enlisted in the Royal Navy on 19 Jun 1909 and in 1911, was bobbing about in Malta Harbour on HMS Medea

HMS Tiger in 1917

On 31 May - 1 Jun 1916 John Martin Mullarkey was serving as a Leading Stoker on HMS Tiger at the Battle of Jutlandthe largest naval battle of the First World War. Tiger was hit a total of 18 times during the battle, suffering 24 men killed and 46 wounded. John Martin Mullarkey stayed with Tiger until 30 Sep 1921.

Spoiler alert: John is the first of three family members (that I know of), all from the same street, to have been at the Battle of Jutland. All three survived.

After leaving the Royal Navy on 1 Apr 1928, John Martin became a Merchant Seaman. John's naval record says that he had a scar on his left thigh (inside) and a heart tattoo on his right forearm. His Merchant Navy record states that the top of his left index finger was crushed. It doesn't say when, where or how. 

John and Elsie Mullarkey had three children:
  1. John George Anthony Mullarkey b. 1 Oct 1920. John George Anthony Mullarkey married Lilian K Clarke in 1958. Born Lilian Kathleen May Hood on 18 Apr 1914, Lilian was probably a widow at the time of this marriage. She had previously married Herbert J Clarke in 1933 and potentially brought with her four children from this marriage. John George Anthony Mullarkey of 15 Dundas Street, Stoke, Plymouth, died on 8 Nov 1974. Lilian Kathleen May Mullarkey died on 25 Jun 1991.
  2. Lilian Kathleen Mullarkey b. 15 Oct 1922. In 1945, Lilian Kathleen Mullarkey married William George Matthews. They appear to have had one child later that year. Lilian Kathleen Matthews died in 1996.
  3. Martyn Mullarkey b. 15 Aug 1930. In 1951, Martyn Mullarkey married Margaret A Pepper and they appear to have one child in 1952. Martyn Mullarkey died, in Plymouth, in 2005.
In 1939, living at 54 Ocean Street, Plymouth, John M Mullarkey's occupation is described as "Greaser Cable Ship Maker Louisa Mackay" (Louisa Mackay was the name of his ship). Son John G A was a Turner And Fitter Apprentice; Lilian K a Shop Assistant and Martyn was at school. Living with them was John G Aitchinson, Retired Shipwright, Widowed (who died in 1941). 

Elsie Mullarkey died in Plymouth, in 1963, aged 73.

John Martin Mullarkey died the following year in 1974.

Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes

Lower Lane, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © N Chadwick - geograph.org.uk/p/6856382

Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes married in East Stonehouse in the 2nd quarter of 1851. At the time of the 1851 Census in March that year, Samuel Gloyne (22) Merchant Sailor, had been lodging with John Coombes (55) Widower, a Scavenger (a scavenger, as a job in Victorian times, was a dustman or street cleaner), his unmarried daughter, Emma Coombes (21) and John Coombes (2), Grandson at 10, Lower Lane, Saint Andrew, Plymouth. 

A record from 1853 lists Samuel Gloyne (b. 1828) as a Merchant Seaman.

Samuel and Emma Gloyne went on to have at least four children together: 

  1. Charlotte Emma Gloyne b. 28 Dec 1854
  2. Emma Jane Gloyne b. 28 Jul 1858
  3. Samuel Richard Pascoe Gloyne b. 14 Aug 1861
  4. Maria Gloyne b. 1863

The first three of those baptised, on 1 Sep 1861, at Charles Church, Plymouth.

In 1861, Samuel Coombes was away, presumably at sea, while Emma Gloyn (sic) Mariner's Wife, was living at 1, Gasking Street, Charles, Plymouth. John (13) was then listed as John Gloyn, rather than Coombes and had become a Rope Marker's Assistant. With them also were Charlotte (6) Scholar, and Emma J (2).

In 1863, the England & Wales Merchant Navy Crew Lists, lists Samuel Gloyne (35) as Able seaman, of the 108 ton vessel, Gipsey, owned by John Bayley, Merchant from Plymouth, under master John Searle of Guildford Street, Plymouth. Samuel Gloyne joined the vessel on 1 Jul 1863.

In 1881, Emma Gloyne was lodging at 37, North Street, Plymouth, just with daughter Maria Gloyne (17) General Servant (Out of Employment). By 1891, Emma Gloyn (60) Nurse, Widow, was lodging in Mildmay Street, Plymouth.

Martin Mullarkey, Catherine Loughlin and Julia Garvey

Speke and Garston Coastal Reserve
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © David Dixon - geograph.org.uk/p/4069433
Looking along the shore of the River Mersey towards Garston Docks

In 1881, Martin Mullarkey (40) had been boarding at 8, Hughes Street, Garston, Liverpool with Anthony Mullarkey (16) General Labourer and Michael Mullarkey (7), among a total of 15, mostly Irish, people. All three said to be from Ireland.

In 1891, Martin Mullarkey (51) General labourer for corporation and his younger son, Michael Mullarkey (17) Shoemaker, were lodging in Thomas Street, Garston. It narrows it down to them being from Mayo, Ireland

On both of these censuses, Martin Mullarkey is described as a widower, which may be doubtful, as several newspaper reports had appeared, one in the Manchester Evening News, on Tuesday, 2 Apr 1872.

AN EXTRORDINARY DEFENCE:- At Liverpool Police Court, yesterday, an Irishman named Martin Mullarkey was charged with bigamy. It having been proved that he was married, some few years ago, at a Roman Catholic chapel near Westport, County Mayo, and that he was married to a woman named Julia Garvey, in Liverpool, about twelve months since, the first wife being still alive, he was called on for his defence. He said that the first marriage was a forced one; that he was taken sixteen miles from his home by a lot of men, and married in spite of himself. (Roars of laughter.) This was done in the dead of night; and he did not think it was allowed for a man to be married without a certificate or anything of that kind. One of the witnesses for the prosecution admitted that the marriage took place at about eleven o'clock at night. The prisoner was remanded.

A later report in the same newspaper on Tuesday, 16 Apr 1872, named the first wife as Miss Catherine Loughlin, who he had married in Islandeady, Mayo, about 12 years previously. It also went on to say that, "The second wife said she did not wish to prosecute, and the prisoner was discharged." She wished to see no more of him, provided he paid for the expense of maintaining the child.

Yet another report, in the Belfast Evening Telegraph on Thursday, 18 Apr 1872, under the headline, BIGAMY MADE EASY, added that Mullarkey had emigrated to England about two years ago (i.e. 1870) and that this second marriage had resulted in the birth of a child. "The circumstance at length reached the ears of the first wife, who came to England in search of her errant husband ..."

Is this the same Martin Mullarkey from Mayo? It certainly fits. 

I've not been able to find birth or marriage records in Ireland to confirm, but I think it safe to believe that Anthony Mullarkey was originally from County Mayo, Ireland and that his mother may or may not have been Catherine Loughlin.

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne

Wyndham Street West, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/1777663
With the spire of the 
Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey, son of Martin Mullarkey and possibly Catherine Loughlin, married Maria Gloyne, daughter of Samuel Pascoe Gloyne and Emma Jane Coombes, on 20 Nov 1887 at the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Mary & St Boniface, Plymouth. On his Royal Marines record, Anthony Mullarkey (b. 5 Dec 1864), said he was from Garston, Liverpool. He had enlisted, in Liverpool, on 5 Jun 1883, his previous job being a Labourer and professed to be Roman Catholic. However, in 1881, Anthony Mullarkey (16) General Labourer, had been boarding at 8, Hughes Street, Garston, along with his father, Martin Mullarkey (40) and Michael Mullarkey (7). All three were said to be from Ireland.

Anthony Joseph Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne had three children:

  1. John Martin Mullarkey b. 10 May 1890
  2. Anthony Charles Mullarkey b. 12 Jan 1893
  3. Kathleen Mullarkey b. 17 Jan 1896
All three were baptised, on 1 May 1896, at St Paul's, East Stonehouse - The Anglican Church, situated at the southern end of Durnford Street. The family's address on these baptism records was listed as 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, with their father's rank listed as Private RMLI.

Victualling yard at the Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda
Captain-tucker, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

On 20 Dec 1895, Anthony had joined HMS Terror (1856) (a 16-gun iron screw floating battery launched in 1856. She became the base ship at Bermuda in 1857), from which he was Discharged Dead (at 32) on 2 Dec 1896. 

In 1901, Maria Mullarkey (36), Seamstress, Widow, was still living at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse with John (11), Charles (8) and Kathleen (5).

In 1911, and still at 8, Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Maria Mullarkey (48) was in receipt of a pension from the Admiralty. Anthony Charles Mullarkey (18) Bugler RMLI was home on leave and Kathleen Mullarkey (15) was an apprentice tailoress to a Military Tailor. John Martin Mullarkey (20) was serving with the Royal Navy on HMS Medea (HMS Medea (1888) was a Marathon-class second class cruiser launched in 1888 and sold in 1914), anchored in Malta Harbour.

Maria Mullarkey died in East Stonehouse in 1924, aged 61.

Monday, 19 July 2021

Frederick Thomas Stone and Kathleen Mullarkey

St Paul Street, Plymouth
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/2333440

Frederick Thomas Stone, of 9 St Paul's Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, second son of Tom Stone and Margaret Knapman, married Kathleen Mullarkey, tailoress, of 8 Admiralty Street, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, only daughter of Anthony Mullarkey and Maria Gloyne, at the King Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, on 4 Aug 1923. Witnesses to the marriage were the bridegroom's first cousin, Charley Stone (undoubtedly best man); Rosina Kathleen Stone, the bridegroom's younger sister (bridesmaid perhaps), and Anthony Charles Mullarkey, the bride's brother, who presumably gave her away. At the time of his marriage, Frederick Thomas Stone gave his rank as Leading Signalman, H.M.S. Sandhurst. Both the bridegroom's father, Tom Stone, and the bride's father, Anthony Mullarkey (both deceased), had been Royal Marines, as were Charley Stone and Anthony Charles Mullarkey. That saved 'em on lounge suits! 

Frederick and Kathleen had two sons: 

  1. Frederick Anthony Stone born 25 July 1924
  2. Douglas John Stone born 27 Sep 1927
Frederick Thomas Stone had enlisted in the Royal Navy as a boy of 15, on 6 Jul 1907 and served until 31 March 1924. He then re-entered on 30 May 1932 as a Signalman. As he was still living in Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages in 1957, I think it safe to deduce that he served through both World Wars.

His naval record lists among his tattoos: an anchor on his right forearm; two female figures and a bird on his right forearm; Eagle, snake, Ensign, rose and thistle. Clasped hands and heart and 8 dots on left forearm. 

Royal Hospital School Bell Tower
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Roger Jones - geograph.org.uk/p/2513717

In 1939, Frederick A Stone was a boarder at the Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy"). I've been unable to locate Frederick Thomas, Kathleen or son Douglas in 1939.

On 11 Aug 1943, Douglas J Stone appears on a "List or Manifest of Aliens Employed on the Vessel as Members of the Crew" of the Marquesa, as an apprentice on his 1st trip to New York. He was 16, 5' 4" and 123lbs.

Part of the old Buckland Hospital, Coombe Valley Road
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © John Baker - geograph.org.uk/p/5105714

Frederick Thomas Stone of 5 Royal Naval Shore Signal Station Cottages, Old Folkstone Road, Dover, died on 11 Nov 1957, aged 65, at Buckland Hospital, Dover, leaving effects of £960 12s 5d to Frederick Anthony Stone, Chief Electrician R.N. and Douglas John Stone, Laboratory Assistant. As she isn't a beneficiary, Kathleen had presumably pre-deceased her husband, but I've [so far] been unable to identify the relevant record of her death.

Douglas John Stone died in 1985 in Kingsbridge, Devon. He will have been 58.

Frederick Anthony Stone died, also in 1985, on 19 Mar, in Newport, Wales. He will have been 60. There is a record of a marriage of a Frederick A Stone in Newport, in 1950, which might explain his presence there. 

Sunday, 18 July 2021

Philip Alfred Stone and Florence Julia Hardwell

Wheatfield north-east of Combe Florey
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Christine Johnstone - geograph.org.uk/p/4096081

Philip Alfred Stone, 11th and last child of Frederick James Stone and Loveday Jane Land, married Florence Julia Hardwell, in Taunton, in 1929. 

Florence Julia Hardwell (b. 26 Mar 1906), daughter of Fred Hardwell and Julia Ann Boon, was baptised in Broadway, Somerset, on 22 Apr 1906. In 1911, her family lived at London Farm, West Bagborough.

In 1939, Philip A and Florence J Stone were living at East Combe, Bishops Lydeard, where Philip was employed as a Threshing Hand. We knew they lived around Combe Florey from the report of Philip's attendance at his nephew's funeral in 1932. I cannot find that this couple had any children.

Philip Alfred Stone died in 1979, in Taunton Deane, in his 70th year. 

Florence Julia Stone died in 1986. She was 80.

Stanley William Stone and Eveline Ann Skinner

Terraced houses, South Molton
cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Derek Harper - geograph.org.uk/p/4679011

Stanley William Stone (b. 7 Jan 1903), the tenth and penultimate child of Frederick James Stone and Loveday Jane Land, is listed on the 1939 Register, by which time he had already been widowed. Living with him at that time, at Foxdon Cottage, South Molton, were an Emily A Crook (b. 1894) - Stanley's elder brother, Frederick James Stone, was married to a Jessie Ann Crook, so family perhaps? - and son, Leslie Walter Stone (b. 17 Mar 1928). On the birth registration for Leslie, the mother's maiden name was listed as Skinner. 

However, there was no record of a marriage of a Stone and a Skinner. 

Eventually, I found Stanley W Stone's marriage to Evelyn A Robjohns, in South Molton, in the first quarter of 1926. Born Eveline Ann Skinner in 1896, she was the daughter of James Henry Skinner and Sarah Jane Cockram and, in 1901, had lived with her family at Backston Cottage, Rackenford and 1911 in East Anstey. Evelyn A Skinner had married George Henry Robjohns (b. 1897), in Tiverton, in 1920, however, he had died in 1925, aged only 28. (The couple had a son, George Henry Robjohns, b. 10 Oct 1920, who died, in Tiverton, in 2003.)

Then Evelyn A Stone died in 1935, aged just 38.

Stanley William Stone died in 1947, aged only 44.

Leslie Walter Stone married in 1949 and died, on 10 Apr 2008, in Sidmouth.

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If you're related to any of the people written about, I'm guessing you'll recognise them from the surnames. If you are, do please get in touch.